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Why was there no controversy over Life in the Scientific Revolution?

In Victor Boantza Marcelo Dascal (ed.), Controversies in the Scientific Revolution. John Benjamins (2010)

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  1. “Empiricism Contra Experiment: Harvey, Locke and the Revisionist View of Experimental Philosophy”.Alan Salter & Charles T. Wolfe - 2009 - Bulletin d'histoire et d'épistémologie des sciences de la vie 16 (2):113-140.
    In this paper we suggest a revisionist perspective on two significant figures in early modern life science and philosophy: William Harvey and John Locke. Harvey, the discoverer of the circulation of the blood, is often named as one of the rare representatives of the ‘life sciences’ who was a major figure in the Scientific Revolution. While this status itself is problematic, we would like to call attention to a different kind of problem: Harvey dislikes abstraction and controlled experiments (aside from (...)
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  • Alchemy Vs. Chemistry: The Etymological Origins of a Historiographic Mistake1.William R. Newman & Lawrence M. Principe - 1998 - Early Science and Medicine 3 (1):32-65.
    The parallel usage of the two terms "alchemy" and "chemistry" by seventeenth-century writers has engendered considerable confusion among historians of science. Many historians have succumbed to the temptation of assuming that the early modern term "chemistry" referred to something like the modern discipline, while supposing that "alchemy" pertained to a different set of practices and beliefs, predominantly the art of transmuting base metals into gold. This paper provides the first exhaustive analysis of the two terms and their interlinguistic cognates in (...)
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  • The Mechanistic Conception of Life. [REVIEW]Jacques Loeb - 1913 - Ancient Philosophy (Misc) 23:152.
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  • 'Biology' in the Life Sciences: A Historiographical Contribution.Joseph A. Caron - 1988 - History of Science 26 (3):223-268.
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  • The Problem of Life. An Essay in the Origins of Biological Thought.C. U. M. Smith - 1976 - Macmillan.
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  • Review: Koselleck's Philosophy of Historical Time and the Practice of History. [REVIEW]John Zammito - 2004 - History and Theory 43 (1):124-135.
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  • Fermentation, Phlogiston and Matter Theory: Chemistry and Natural Philosophy in Georg Ernst Stahl's Zymotechnia Fundamentalis.Ku-Ming Chang - 2002 - Early Science and Medicine 7 (1):31-64.
    This paper examines Georg Ernst Stahl's first book, the Zymotechnia Fundamentalis, in the context of contemporary natural philosophy and the author's career. I argue that the Zymotechnia was a mechanical theory of fermentation written consciously against the influential "fermentational program" of Joan Baptista van Helmont and especially Thomas Willis. Stahl's theory of fermentation introduced his first conception of phlogiston, which was in part a corpuscular transformation of the Paracelsian sulphur principle. Meanwhile some assumptions underlying this theory, such as the composition (...)
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  • The Study of Controversies and the Theory and History of Science.Marcelo Dascal - 1998 - Science in Context 11 (2):147-154.
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  • Controversy.Gideon Freudenthal - 1998 - Science in Context 11 (2):155-160.
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  • Leibniz Vs.Sarah Carvallo - unknown
    Between 1707 and 1708, Georg Ernst Stahl presented his medical doctrine under the title Theoria Medica vera. Leibniz immediately questioned certain points in Stahl's doctrine. He made two principal points: the first dealt with three general questions on the logical and metaphysical foundations of science; the second focused on certain specific statements made by Stahl in his treatises. The controversy between Stahl and Leibniz can be used as a prism through which the debate within the République des Lettres about the (...)
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  • The Animal Economy as Object and Program in Montpellier Vitalism.Charles T. Wolfe & Motoichi Terada - 2008 - Science in Context 21 (4):537-579.
    Our aim in this paper is to bring to light the importance of the notion of économie animale in Montpellier vitalism, as a hybrid concept which brings together the structural and functional dimensions of the living body – dimensions which hitherto had primarily been studied according to a mechanistic model, or were discussed within the framework of Stahlian animism. The celebrated image of the bee-swarm expresses this structural-functional understanding of living bodies quite well: “One sees them press against each other, (...)
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  • What Ever Happened to Francis Glisson? Albrecht Haller and the Fate of Eighteenth-Century Irritability.Guido Giglioni - 2008 - Science in Context 21 (4):465-493.
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  • 1064332 atomes et un cercle de vie.Alexandre Métraux - 2004 - Multitudes 2 (2):41-47.
    The article addresses the old question of vitalism, starting with a very concrete and recent example: the successful laboratory production of the polio virus. Following this, the author recalls two types of arguments on the nature of living being: those of Leibniz and those of Claude Bernard. If, according to the biologists who produced the virus themselves, life’s unique trait is self-replication, what should one make of the dominant position in philosophy of biology today, which denies any argument based on (...)
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  • Mechanisms of Life in the Seventeenth Century: Borelli, Perrault, Régis.Dennis Des Chene - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (2):245-260.
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  • Assessing the Prospects for a Return of Organisms in Evolutionary Biology.Philippe Huneman - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (2/3).
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  • Biologists Behaving Badly: Vitalism and the Language of Language.Susan Oyama - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (2/3).
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  • The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy.Justin E. H. Smith (ed.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume Smith examines the early modern science of generation, which included the study of animal conception, heredity, and fetal development. Analyzing how it influenced the contemporary treatment of traditional philosophical questions, it also demonstrates how philosophical pre-suppositions about mechanism, substance, and cause informed the interpretations offered by those conducting empirical research on animal reproduction. Composed of essays written by an international team of leading scholars, the book offers a fresh perspective on some of the basic problems in early (...)
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  • The Philosophy of Biology: An Episodic History.Marjorie Grene & David Depew - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Is life different from the non-living? If so, how? And how, in that case, does biology as the study of living things differ from other sciences? These questions are traced through an exploration of episodes in the history of biology and philosophy. The book begins with Aristotle, then moves on to Descartes, comparing his position with that of Harvey. In the eighteenth century the authors consider Buffon and Kant. In the nineteenth century the authors examine the Cuvier-Geoffroy debate, pre-Darwinian geology (...)
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  • Koselleck's Philosophy of Historical Time(s) and the Practice of History.John Zammito - 2004 - History and Theory 43 (1):124–135.
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  • On Biological Analogs of Newtonian Paradigms.Thomas S. Hall - 1968 - Philosophy of Science 35 (1):6-27.
    To what extent is the scientist's endeavor qua scientist influenced by his philosophic image of himself? A preliminary and partial answer to this question is suggested by a study of eight physiological thinkers of the second half of the eighteenth century, a period during which biology was much influenced by the scientific and philosophical ideas of Isaac Newton. At this time, physiologists invoked certain "principles," "properties," and "powers" which were deemed useful as explanatory devices, even though they could not themselves (...)
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  • Ideas of Life and Matter.Thomas S. Hall - 1972 - Philosophy of Science 39 (1):101-102.
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  • Matter, Life and Generation: Eighteenth-Century Embryology and the Haller-Wolff Debate.Shirley A. Roe - 1985 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (1):94-99.
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  • Life After Descartes: Regis on Generation.Dennis Des Chene - 2003 - Perspectives on Science 11 (4):410-420.
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  • The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge. Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science.Charles T. Wolfe & Ofer Gal (eds.) - 2010 - Springer.
    This volume focuses on the development of empiricism as an interest in the body - as both the object of research and the subject of experience.
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  • Les Mote et les Choses.Michel Foucault - 1969 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 74 (2):250-251.
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  • Mastering the Appetites of Matter. Francis Bacon's Sylva Sylvarum.Guido Giglioni - 2010 - In Charles T. Wolfe & Ofer Gal (eds.), The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge. Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science. Springer. pp. 149--167.
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  • The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy.Justin E. H. Smith - 2008 - Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):575-577.
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  • Spinoza Et la Pensée Francaise Avant la Révolution.Paul Vernière - 1954 - Slatkine Reprints.
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  • The Problem of Life; An Essay in the Origins of Biological Thought.C. V. M. Smith - 1979 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):199-202.
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  • Physiology and Classification: Historical Relations.Joseph Schiller - 1982 - Journal of the History of Biology 15 (1):156-156.
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  • Divulging of Useful Truths in Physick the Medical Agenda of Robert Boyle.Barbara Beigun Kaplan - 1993
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  • The Mechanistic Conception of Life : Biological Essays / by Jacques Loeb.Jacques Loeb - unknown
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  • The Canonical Imperative: Rethinking the Scientific Revolution.Margaret J. Osler - 2000 - In Rethinking the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press. pp. 3--24.
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  • Rethinking the Scientific Revolution.Margaret J. Osler (ed.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection reconsiders canonical figures and the formation of disciplinary boundaries during the Scientific Revolution.
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  • La Philosophie de Gassendi.O. R. Bloch - 1973 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 78 (2):261-262.
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  • The Enlightenment and Science in Eighteenth-Century France.Colm Kiernan - 1973 - Voltaire Foundation.
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  • Leibniz et les machines de la nature.Michel Fichant - 2003 - Studia Leibnitiana 35 (1):1 - 28.
    Das Konzept der Naturmaschine ist durch Leibniz 1695 in seinem Système nouveau de la nature et de la communication des substances eingeführt worden. Es liefert die Realdefinition des organischen Körpers und gibt ein Unterscheidungskriterium zwischen Körpern, die organisch sind, und solchen, die es nicht sind, an: die Zerlegung ins Unendliche der Maschine in andere Maschinen, ohne dass man ein Ende erhält, das nicht selbst Maschine wäre. Diese Struktur der Verschachtelung entspricht derjenigen, die der materia secunda, wie Leibniz sie nennt, eine (...)
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  • Chimie et biologie: Des « molécules organiques » de Buffon à la « physico-chimie » de Lamarck.Jacques Roger - 1979 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 1 (1):43 - 64.
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  • Vitalizing Nature in the Enlightenment.Peter Hanns Reill - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):199-203.
    This far-reaching study redraws the intellectual map of the Enlightenment and boldly reassesses the legacy of that highly influential period for us today. Peter Hanns Reill argues that in the middle of the eighteenth century, a major shift occurred in the way Enlightenment thinkers conceived of nature that caused many of them to reject the prevailing doctrine of mechanism and turn to a vitalistic model to account for phenomena in natural history, the life sciences, and chemistry. As he traces the (...)
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  • La physiologie des Lumières.François Duchesneau - 1984 - Lumen 2:139-156.
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  • La Notion d'Organisation Dans l'Histoire de la Biologie.Joseph Schiller - 1978
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  • La Philosophic de Gassendi.Olivier René Bloch - 1972 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 28 (2):229-229.
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  • La physiologie des Lumières. Empirisme, modèles et théories.Fr Duchesneau - 1986 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 48 (2):340-341.
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  • Leibniz et Stahl: divergences sur le concept d'organisme.Francois Duchesneau - 1995 - Studia Leibnitiana 27 (2):185-212.
    Both Stahl and Leibniz worked out conceptions of the organism that diverged significantly from the mechanistic models involved in the Cartesian dualism of soul and body. In the polemics which developed in 1709-1710 concerning Stahl's Theoria medica vera , Leibniz focused his attacks on what he considered a paralogistic theory of the soul; he wondered in particular how such an abstruse metaphysics could be reconciled with the scientific analysis of vital phenomena. Contrary to Stahl, Leibniz would defend the view that (...)
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  • The French Paracelsians: The Chemical Challenge to Medical and Scientific Tradition in Early Modern France.A. G. Debus & P. O. Long - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (1):91-92.
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