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Alex Dubilet
Vanderbilt University
Alex Dubilet
University of California, Berkeley
  1.  80
    On the General Secular Contradiction: Secularization, Christianity, and Political Theology.Alex Dubilet - 2021 - In Alex Dubilet & Kirill Chepurin (eds.), Nothing Absolute: German Idealism and the Question of Political Theology. New York, NY, USA: pp. 240-255.
    Dubilet’s contribution turns to Marx’s “On the Jewish Question” in order to diagnose the collusive interplay between mediation and sovereignty as modes of transcendence that, together, prevent real immanence from irrupting. It does so by recovering the logic of “the general secular contradiction”—the division between the state and civil society that materializes and secularizes the structure of diremption originally articulated in theological form, as the opposition between heaven and earth. In this analysis, the logic of Christianity is shown to be (...)
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  2. Russia’s Atopic Nothingness: Ungrounding the World-Historical Whole with Pyotr Chaadaev.Kirill Chepurin & Alex Dubilet - 2019 - Angelaki 24 (6):135-151.
    Russian philosopher Pyotr Chaadaev (1794–1856) declared Russia to be a non-place in both space and time, a singular nothingness without history, topos, or footing, without relation or attachment to the world-historical tradition culminating in Christian-European modernity. This paper recovers Chaadaev’s conception of nothingness as that which, unbound by tradition, constitutes a total, even revolutionary ungrounding of the world-whole. Working with and through Chaadaev’s key writings, we trace his articulation of immanent nothingness or the void of the Real as completely emptying (...)
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  3.  44
    An Immanence Without the World.Alex Dubilet - 2021 - Qui Parle 1 (30):51–86.
    This essay proposes to rethink the conceptual associations that bind immanence to the secular and oppose it to (divine) transcendence. It asks: What if immanence is divorced from the conceptual opposition between the world and its openings to (divine) other(s), between enclosure and the trace of a transcendent outside? What might arise if immanence is severed from its link with secularity, if it ceases to be merely another conceptual support in secularism’s metaphysical armature? To pursue these questions, the essay engages (...)
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  4. Sovereign Nothingness: Pyotr Chaadaev's Political Theology.Kirill Chepurin & Alex Dubilet - 2019 - Theory and Event 22 (2):243-266.
    This paper speculatively reconstructs the unique intervention that Pyotr Chaadaev, the early nineteenth-century Russian thinker, made into the political-theological debate. Instead of positioning sovereignty and exception against each other, Chaadaev seeks to think the (Russian) exception immanently, affirming its nonrelation to, and even nullity or nothingness vis-à-vis, the (European, Christian-modern) world-historical regime—and to theorize the logic of sovereignty that could arise from within this nullity. As a result, we argue, nothingness itself becomes, in Chaadaev, operative through and as the sovereign (...)
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  5.  55
    The Void of Thought and the Ambivalence of History: Chaadaev, Bakunin, and Fedorov.Kirill Chepurin & Alex Dubilet - 2021 - In Panayiota Vassilopoulou & Daniel Whistler (eds.), Thought: A Philosophical History. New York City, New York, USA: pp. 293-306.
    This paper cuts across three nineteenth-century Russian thinkers—Pyotr Chaadaev, Mikhail Bakunin and Nikolai Fedorov—to reconstruct a speculative trajectory that seeks to think an ungrounding and delegitimation of the (Christian-modern) world and its logics of violence, domination, and exclusion. In Chaadaev, Russia becomes a territory of nothingness—an absolute exception from history, tradition, and memory, without attachment or relation to world history. Ultimately, Chaadaev affirms this atopic void in its immanence, as capable of creating immanently from itself a common future. Bakunin is (...)
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  6.  37
    (Non-)Human Identity and Radical Immanence: On Man-in-Person in François Laruelle's Non-Philosophy.Alex Dubilet - 2017 - In Rocco Gangle & Julius Greve (eds.), Superpositions: Laruelle and the Humanities. London, UK: pp. 31-45.
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