Order:
See also
Annie Selden
New Mexico State University
  1. Unpacking the Logic of Mathematical Statements.Annie Selden - 1995 - Educational Studies in Mathematics 29:123-151.
    This study focuses on undergraduate students' ability to unpack informally written mathematical statements into the language of predicate calculus. Data were collected between 1989 and 1993 from 61students in six small sections of a “bridge" course designed to introduce proofs and mathematical reasoning. We discuss this data from a perspective that extends the notion of concept image to that of statement image and introduces the notion of proof framework to indicate the top-level logical structure of a proof. For simplified informal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2. Validations of Proofs Considered as Texts: Can Undergraduates Tell Whether an Argument Proves a Theorem?Annie Selden - 2003 - Journal for Mathematics Education Research 34 (1):4-36.
    We report on an exploratory study of the way eight mid-level undergraduate mathematics majors read and reflected on four student-generated arguments purported to be proofs of a single theorem. The results suggest that mid-level undergraduates tend to focus on surface features of such arguments and that their ability to determine whether arguments are proofs is very limited -- perhaps more so than either they or their instructors recognize. We begin by discussing arguments (purported proofs) regarded as texts and validations of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3. Affect, Behavioural Schemas and the Proving Process.Annie Selden, John Selden & Kerry McKee - 2010 - International Journal for Mathematical Education in Science and Technology 41 (2):199-215.
    In this largely theoretical article, we discuss the relation between a kind of affect, behavioural schemas and aspects of the proving process. We begin with affect as described in the mathematics education literature, but soon narrow our focus to a particular kind of affect – nonemotional cognitive feelings. We then mention the position of feelings in consciousness because that bears on the kind of data about feelings that students can be expected to be able to report. Next we introduce the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Teaching Proving by Coordinating Aspects of Proofs with Students' Abilities.Annie Selden & John Selden - 2009 - In Despina A. Stylianou, Maria L. Blanton & Eric J. Knuth (eds.), Teaching and Learning Proof Across the Grades: A K-16 Perspective. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 339--354.
    In this chapter we introduce concepts for analyzing proofs, and for analyzing undergraduate and beginning graduate mathematics students’ proving abilities. We discuss how coordination of these two analyses can be used to improve students’ ability to construct proofs. -/- For this purpose, we need a richer framework for keeping track of students’ progress than the everyday one used by mathematicians. We need to know more than that a particular student can, or cannot, prove theorems by induction or contradiction or can, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark