13 found
Order:
See also
Chad Douglas Nilep
Nagoya University
  1. 'Code Switching' in Sociocultural Linguistics.Chad Nilep - 2006 - Colorado Research in Linguistics 19 (1):1-22.
    This paper reviews a brief portion of the literature on code switching in sociology, linguistic anthropology, and sociolinguistics, and suggests a definition of the term for sociocultural analysis. Code switching is defined as the practice of selecting or altering linguistic elements so as to contextualize talk in interaction. This contextualization may relate to local discourse practices, such as turn selection or various forms of bracketing, or it may make relevant information beyond the current exchange, including knowledge of society and diverse (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Code Switching, Identity, and Globalization.Kira Hall & Chad Nilep - 2015 - In Deborah Tannen, Heidi E. Hamilton & Deborah Schiffrin (eds.), Handbook of Discourse Analysis. Blackwell. pp. 597-619.
    Since the mid-twentieth century, treatments of code switching and associated practices have converged toward understanding linguistic hybridity and diverse sociality amid accelerating globalization of peoples, social groups, and commodified languages. This chapter reviews four traditions of code switching research that suggest divergent theoretical perspectives on language and identity. The first, established in the 1960s within the ethnography of communication, situates code switching as a product of local speech community identities. Research on language and political economy in the 1980s initiated a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Analysing Political Discourse: Theory and Practice, Paul Chilton. [REVIEW]Chad Nilep - 2004 - Journal of Pragmatics 36 (12):2197-2201.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. When Phonation Matters: The Use and Function of Yeah and Creaky Voice.Tamara Grivicic & Chad Nilep - 2004 - Colorado Research in Linguistics 17 (1):1-11.
    This paper illuminates the conversational functions of the combination of creaky voice quality and the response token yeah. Jefferson described yeah as an acknowledgement token that also projects “a preparedness to shift from recipiency to speakership”. This speaker incipiency is not consistent, though. While yeah is sometimes used to indicate a shift from recipient to speaker, it is sometimes used simply as an acknowledgement token. This difference in function of apparently similar items may be related to token shape. This paper (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Identity and Code Choice: Code-Switching and Social Identity Among Japanese/English Bilingual Siblings.Chad Nilep - 2004 - Actas Do II Simposio Internacional Sobre o Bilingüismo.
    Within the family, siblings work to create separate, stable social identities. One of the jobs of language socialization is the acquisition and appreciation of appropriate forms with which to perform the acts and stances which create social role. Children learn which roles are expected of them, and which forms are appropriate for the enactment of these roles in part through "trying on" various roles which may then be ratified or rejected by other members of the family. In addition to ratifying (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Sibling Interaction and Symbolic Capital: Toward a Theory of Political Micro-Economy.Chad Nilep - 2009 - Journal of Pragmatics 41 (9):1683-1692.
    Older siblings play a role in their younger siblings’ language socialization by ratifying or rejecting linguistic behavior. In addition, older siblings may engage in a struggle to maintain their dominant position in the family hierarchy. This struggle is seen through the lens of language and political economy as a struggle for symbolic capital. Bilingual adolescent sibling interactions are analyzed as expressions both of identity and of symbolic power. This paper proposes a theory of political micro-economy, by which analysts may trace (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Emi Morita: Negotiation of Contingent Talk: The Japanese Interactional Particles Ne and Sa. [REVIEW]Chad Nilep - 2007 - Language in Society 36 (1):144-145.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Ideologies of Language at Hippo Family Club.Chad Nilep - 2015 - Pragmatics 25 (2):205-227.
    Ethnographic study of Hippo Family Club, a foreign language learning club in Japan with chapters elsewhere, reveals a critique of foreign language teaching in Japanese schools and in the commercial English conversation industry. Club members contrast their own learning methods, which they view as “natural language acquisition”, with the formal study of grammar, which they see as uninteresting and ineffective. Rather than evaluating either the Hippo approach to learning or the teaching methods they criticize, however, this paper considers the ways (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Promising Without Speaking.Chad Nilep - 2013 - In Adam Hodges (ed.), Discourses of War and Peace. Oxford University Press. pp. 145-167.
    This chapter argues that political promises do not have to be made by individual politicians. Rather, multiparty discourses may be attributed to political leaders, a process labeled metaphorical promising. It analyzes Yukio Hatoyama's brief (2009-2010) reign as Prime Minister of Japan. Hatoyama was forced to resign amid charges that he had failed to remove a US military base from Futenma, Okinawa. Although Japanese newspapers accused him of breaking promises to move the base, Hatoyama had never explicitly promised to do so. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Negotiation of Identity in Multilingual Contexts: Aneta Pavlenko, Adrian Blackledge. [REVIEW]Chad Nilep - 2006 - Journal of Pragmatics 38 (2):276-281.
    Review of the book Negotiation of Identity in Multilingual Contexts, Aneta Pavlenko and Adrian Blackledge (eds.) 2004.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Language and Society in Japan: Nanette Gottlieb. [REVIEW]Chad Nilep - 2006 - Journal of Pragmatics 38 (8):1313-1318.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  83
    Logical Thinking Education to Combat Plagiarism.Wai Ling Lai & Chad Nilep - 2014 - Gengo bunka ronshu 36 (1):179-193.
    Plagiarism, which Indiana University’s Writing Tutorial Service defines as "using others' ideas and words without clearly acknowledging the source of that information", is often described as a major problem. However, standard definitions such as this one suggest only limited solutions to the problem: acknowledging sources or forbidding reuse. Since all scholarship involves engaging with the ideas of others and academic writing tends to reuse certain expressions, these solutions – though important – are of limited utility. This paper examines a type (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  79
    Distinctive Functions of Quotative Markers: Evidence From Meidai Kaiwa Corpus.Chad Nilep - 2013 - Gengo bunka ronshu 35 (1):87-103.
    The Japanese particle 'to' serves as a quotative marker, either indicating the content of speech or thought, or serving related functions. The particle 'tte' is frequently identified as an informal variant of 'to', serving identical or nearly identical functions. Scholars have suggested the two forms may have different distribution or function, but to date there has been little empirical work to distinguish the forms using broad-based corpus methods. This study of a corpus 129 informal conversations suggests that both particles are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark