12 found
Order:
See also
  1. Reflexivity and Bracketing in Sociological Phenomenological Research: Researching the Competitive Swimming Lifeworld.Gareth McNarry, Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson & Adam Evans - 2019 - Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health 11 (1):38-51.
    In this article, following on from earlier debates in the journal regarding the ‘thorny issue’ of epochē and bracketing in sociological phenomenological research, we consider more generally the challenges of engaging in reflexivity and bracketing when undertaking ethnographic ‘insider’ research, or research in familiar settings. We ground our discussion and illustrate some of the key challenges by drawing on the experience of undertaking this research approach with a group of competitive swimmers, who were participating in a British university performance swimming (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  36
    Sporting Embodiment: Sports Studies and the (Continuing) Promise of Phenomenology.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2009 - Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise 1 (3):279-296.
    Whilst in recent years sports studies have addressed the calls ‘to bring the body back in’ to theorisations of sport and physical activity, the ‘promise of phenomenology’ remains largely under-realised with regard to sporting embodiment. Relatively few accounts are grounded in the ‘flesh’ of the lived sporting body, and phenomenology offers a powerful framework for such analysis. A wide-ranging, multi-stranded, and interpretatively contested perspective, phenomenology in general has been taken up and utilised in very different ways within different disciplinary fields. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  3. Endurance Work’: Embodiment and the Mind-Body Nexus in the Physical Culture of High-Altitude Mountaineering.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, Lee Crust & Christian Swann - 2018 - Sociology 52 (6):1324-1341.
    The 2015 Nepal earthquake and avalanche on Mount Everest generated one of the deadliest mountaineering disasters in modern times, bringing to media attention the physical-cultural world of high-altitude climbing. Contributing to the current sociological concern with embodiment, here we investigate the lived experience and social ‘production’ of endurance in this sociologically under-researched physical-cultural world. Via a phenomenological-sociological framework, we analyse endurance as cognitively, corporeally and interactionally lived and communicated, in the form of ‘endurance work’. Data emanate from in-depth interviews with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. Intention and Epochē in Tension: Autophenomenography, Bracketing and a Novel Approach to Researching Sporting Embodiment.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2011 - Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health 3 (1):48-62.
    This article considers a novel approach to researching sporting embodiment via what has been termed ‘autophenomenography’. Whilst having some similarities with autoethnography, autophenomenography provides a distinctive research form, located within phenomenology as theoretical and methodological tradition. Its focus is upon the researcher’s own lived experience of a phenomenon or phenomena. This article examines some of the key elements of a sociological phenomenological approach to studying sporting embodiment in general before portraying how autophenomenography was utilised specifically within two recent research projects (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  5.  91
    To Be or Not to Be Phenomenology? That is the Question.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson & Adam Evans - 2019 - European Journal for Sport and Society 16 (4):295-300.
    Recent years have seen a burgeoning in phenomenological research on sport, physical cultures and exercise. As editors and reviewers, however, we frequently and consistently see social science articles that claim to be ‘phenomenological’ or to use phenomenology, but the reasons for such claims are not always evident. Indeed, on closer reading, many such claims can often turn out to be highly problematic. At this point, we should clarify that our ‘terrain de sport’ constitutes what has been termed ‘empirical phenomenology’ (Martínková (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  57
    Weather-Wise? Sporting Embodiment, Weather Work and Weather Learning in Running and Triathlon.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, George Jennings, Anu Vaittinen & Helen Owton - 2019 - International Review for the Sociology of Sport 54 (7):777-792.
    Weather experiences are currently surprisingly under-explored and under-theorised in sociology and sport sociology, despite the importance of weather in both routine, everyday life and in recreational sporting and physical–cultural contexts. To address this lacuna, we examine here the lived experience of weather, including ‘weather work’ and ‘weather learning’, in our specific physical–cultural worlds of distance-running, triathlon and jogging in the United Kingdom. Drawing on a theoretical framework of phenomenological sociology, and the findings from five separate auto/ethnographic projects, we explore the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  25
    Intense Embodiment: Senses of Heat in Women’s Running and Boxing.Helen Owton & Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2015 - Body and Society 21 (2):245-268.
    In recent years, calls have been made to address the relative dearth of qualitative sociological investigation into the sensory dimensions of embodiment, including within physical cultures. This article contributes to a small, innovative and developing literature utilizing sociological phenomenology to examine sensuous embodiment. Drawing upon data from three research projects, here we explore some of the ‘sensuousities’ of ‘intense embodiment’ experiences as a distance-running-woman and a boxing-woman, respectively. Our analysis addresses the relatively unexplored haptic senses, particularly the ‘touch’ of heat. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  48
    Running Embodiment, Power and Vulnerability: Notes Towards a Feminist Phenomenology of Female Running.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2010 - In P. Markula & E. Kennedy (eds.), Women and Exercise: The Body, Health and Consumerism. London, UK:
    Introduction: Over the past twenty-five years the sporting body has been studied in a myriad of ways including via a range of feminist frameworks (Hall 1996; Lowe 1998; Markula 2003; George 2005; Hargreaves 2007) and gender-sensitive lenses (e.g. McKay 1994; Aoki 1996; Woodward 2008). Despite this developing corpus, studies of sport only rarely engage in depth with the ‘flesh’ of the lived sporting and exercizing body (Wainwright and Turner 2003; Allen-Collinson 2009) at least from a phenomenological angle, and in relation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  53
    Sporting Embodiments: Sports Studies and the (Continuing) Promise of Phenomenology.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2017 - In M. Giardina & M. Donnelly (eds.), Physical Culture, Ethnography and the Body: Theory, Method and Praxis. Abingdon, UK:
    Whilst in recent years sports studies have addressed the calls ‘to bring the body back in’ to theorisations of sport and physical activity, the ‘promise of phenomenology’ remains largely under-realised with regard to sporting embodiment. Relatively few accounts are grounded in the ‘flesh’ of the lived sporting body, and phenomenology offers a powerful framework for such analysis. A wide-ranging, multi-stranded, and interpretatively contested perspective, phenomenology in general has been taken up and utilised in very different ways within different disciplinary fields. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  21
    ‘Weather Work’: Embodiment and Weather Learning in a National Outdoor Exercise Programme.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2018 - Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health 1 (10):63-74.
    Over the past 25 years, UK government policy exhortations to promote and increase exercise and physical activity levels in the population have increased in volume. In recent years, too, there has been growing sociological interest in exercise and physical activity embodiment issues, including within phenomenologically-inspired research into lived-body experiences. This article contributes original insights to a developing body of phenomenological-sociological empirical work in this domain, in addressing the lived experience of organised exercise in outdoor environments, and specifically in theorising the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Sensory Sociological Phenomenology, Somatic Learning and 'Lived' Temperature in Competitive Pool Swimming.Gareth McNarry, Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson & Adam Evans - 2020 - The Sociological Review 68.
    In this article, we address an existing lacuna in the sociology of the senses, by employing sociological phenomenology to illuminate the under-researched sense of temperature, as lived by a social group for whom water temperature is particularly salient: competitive pool swimmers. The research contributes to a developing ‘sensory sociology’ that highlights the importance of the socio-cultural framing of the senses and ‘sensory work’, but where there remains a dearth of sociological exploration into senses extending beyond the ‘classic five’ sensorium. Drawing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  35
    Superwomen? Young Sporting Women, Temporality, and Learning Not to Be Perfect.N. Ronkainen, Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, Kenneth Aggerholm & Tatiana Ryba - 2020 - International Review for the Sociology of Sport.
    New forms of neoliberal femininity create demanding horizons of expectation for young women. For talented athletes, these pressures are intensified by the establishment of dual-career discourses that construct the combination of high-performance sport and education as a normative, ‘ideal’ pathway. The pressed time perspective inherent in dual-careers requires athletes to employ a variety of time-related skills, especially for young women who aim to live up to ‘superwoman’ ideals that valorize ‘success’ in all walks of life. Drawing on existential phenomenology, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark