Results for 'Kei Nishiyama'

6 found
Order:
See also
Kei Nishiyama
Australian National University
  1. Rethinking Consensus in the Community of Philosophical Inquiry: A Research Agenda.Kei Nishiyama - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:83-97.
    In Philosophy for Children (P4C), consensus-making is often regarded as something that needs to be avoided. P4C scholars believe that consensus-making would dismiss P4C’s ideals, such as freedom, inclusiveness, and diversity. This paper aims to counteract such assumptions, arguing that P4C scholars tend to focus on a narrow, or universal, concept of “consensus” and dismiss various forms of consensus, especially what Niemeyer and Dryzek (2007) call meta-consensus. Meta-consensus does not search for universal consensus, but focuses on the process by which (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  19
    Engineer Education as Citizenship Education.Ogawa Taiji, Murase Tomoyuki & Kei Nishiyama - 2020 - In Proceedings of InInternational Symposium on Advances in Technology Education Conference. International Symposium on Advances in Technology Education. pp. 326-331.
    Engineering and technology aim to lead a better life for people. But the meaning of “better” is highly contested in modern democratic societies where different citizens have different cultures and values. Engineers, as one of the citizens in such societies, are also living in multicultural and multi-value settings, and therefore they need to be responsible for such diversity when they engage in technological developments. Therefore, in engineering education, it is necessary to aim at not only acquiring the specialized technological knowledge (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. A Phenomenological Study of “Herbivore Men”.Masahiro Morioka - 2013 - The Review of Life Studies 4:1-20.
    From 2008 to 2009, “herbivore men (sôshoku danshi or sôshoku-kei danshi in Japanese)” became a trendy, widely used term in Japanese. It flourished in all sorts of media, including TV, the Internet, newspapers and magazines, and could even occasionally be heard in everyday conversation. As it became more popular its original meaning was diversified, and people began to use it with a variety of different nuances. In December of 2009 it made the top ten list of nominees for the “Buzzword (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. A Democratic Consensus? Isaiah Berlin, Hannah Arendt, and the Anti-Totalitarian Family Quarrel.Kei Hiruta - 2018 - Think 17 (48):25-37.
    Amid the ongoing political turmoil, symbolized by the recent violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, books and articles abound today to encourage us to re-read anti-totalitarian classics ‘for our times’. But what do we find in this body of work originally written in response to Nazism and Stalinism? Do we find a democratic consensus forged by a shared anti-totalitarian commitment? I doubt it. Considering the cases of Isaiah Berlin and Hannah Arendt, this article highlights discord beneath what may today appear like a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Meaning and Value of Freedom: Berlin Contra Arendt.Kei Hiruta - 2014 - The European Legacy 19 (7):854-868.
    This essay considers the theoretical disagreement between Isaiah Berlin and Hannah Arendt on the meaning and value of freedom. Berlin thinks that negative liberty as non-interference is commendable because it is attuned to the implication of value pluralism that man is a choice-making creature and cannot be otherwise. By contrast, the political freedom to act is in Arendt’s view a more fulfilling ideal because it is only in political action that man’s potentiality is actualised, his unique identity manifested and his (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. An ‘Anti-Utopian Age?’: Isaiah Berlin’s England, Hannah Arendt’s America, and Utopian Thinking in Dark Times.Kei Hiruta - 2017 - Journal of Political Ideologies 22 (1):12-29.
    This essay challenges the influential view that Isaiah Berlin and Hannah Arendt played a central role in inaugurating an ‘anti-utopian age’. While the two thinkers certainly did their share to discredit the radical utopian inclination to portray a political blueprint in the abstract, I show that neither was straightforwardly anti-utopian. On the contrary, both thinkers’ writings display a different kind of utopian thinking, consisting in an imaginative and idealized reconstruction of existing polities. Schematically put, Berlin’s utopia was England reconstructed as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark