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Laura Wildemann Kane [5]Laura Kane [1]
  1. What is a Family? Considerations on Purpose, Biology, and Sociality.Laura Wildemann Kane - 2019 - Public Affairs Quarterly 33 (1):65-88.
    There are many different interpretations of what the family should be – its desired member composition, its primary purpose, and its cultural significance – and many different examples of what families actually look like across the globe. I examine the most paradigmatic conceptions of the family that are based upon the supposed primary purpose that the family serves for its members and for the state. I then suggest that we ought to reconceptualize how we understand and define the family in (...)
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  2. On Hegel, Women, and the Foundation of Ethical Life: Why Gender Doesn’t Belong in the Family.Laura Wildemann Kane - 2015 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 44 (1):1-17.
    Feminist philosophers are right to criticize Hegel’s prejudices against women. In many of his works, Hegel reduces women to their physiology as means of explaining why they occupy a subordinate role in nature and in society. Such treatment seems arbitrary at best, for the gendering of roles disrupts Hegel’s dialectical approach to spirit without any meaningful gain. Despite this defect in Hegel’s work, what is positive in Hegelian social and political philosophy remains intact. In this paper I argue that the (...)
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  3. Accountability and Community on the Internet: A Plea for Restorative Justice.Laura Wildemann Kane - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (4):594-611.
    In this article, I analyze norm enforcement on social media, specifically cases where an agent has committed a moral transgression online and is brought to account by an Internet mob with incongruously injurious results in their offline life. I argue that users problematically imagine that they are members of a particular kind of moral community where shaming behaviors are not only acceptable, but morally required to ‘take down’ those who appear to violate community norms. I then demonstrate the costs that (...)
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  4. Weighing Identity in Procreative Decisions.Laura Kane - 2023 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 9 (3).
    The question of whether or not one should procreate is rarely cast as a personal choice in philosophical discourse; rather, it is presented as an ethical choice made against a backdrop of aggregate concerns. But justifications concerning procreation in popular culture regularly engage with the role that identity plays in making procreative decisions; specifically, how one’s decision will affect who they are and who they might be in the future. Women in particular cite the personally transformative aspects of becoming a (...)
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  5. Who Guards the Gates? Feminist Methods of Scholarly Publishing.Laura Wildemann Kane, Amanda Licastro & Danica Savonick - 2023 - Interdisciplinary Digital Engagement in Arts and Humanities 3 (3).
    In this essay, we explore how digital publishing can intervene in these processes and serve as a form of feminist activism. We take as our focus the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy (JITP), founded in 2011 to expand the perspectives and standpoints that count as scholarly knowledge production and provide graduate students with editorial experience. As three long-standing members of the journal’s editorial collective, we have firsthand knowledge of how JITP’s publishing methods were developed through debate, struggle, and dialogue, (...)
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  6.  96
    Encouraging Critical Engagement with Course Readings Through Focused Reading Responses.Laura Wildemann Kane - 2022 - Currents in Teaching and Learning 13 (2):28-37.
    In this paper I demonstrate how Focused Reading Responses motivate students to 1) critically engage with reading assignments, and 2) write more substantive reading responses. A focused reading response asks students to reflect upon several aspects of a reading assignment by responding, in writing, to a number of prompts that serve to engage students in critical thinking while also limiting the overall length of the response. Each prompt can be adjusted to accommodate the instructor’s subject matter and teaching modality. Additionally, (...)
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