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Paul Muench
University of Montana
  1. Socratic Irony, Plato's Apology, and Kierkegaard's On the Concept of Irony.Paul Muench - 2009 - In Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Hermann Deuser & K. Brian Söderquist (eds.), Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook. de Gruyter. pp. 71-125.
    In this paper I argue that Plato's Apology is the principal text on which Kierkegaard relies in arguing for the idea that Socrates is fundamentally an ironist. After providing an overview of the structure of this argument, I then consider Kierkegaard's more general discussion of irony, unpacking the distinction he draws between irony as a figure of speech and irony as a standpoint. I conclude by examining Kierkegaard's claim that the Apology itself is “splendidly suited for obtaining a clear concept (...)
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  2. The Socratic Method of Kierkegaard’s Pseudonym Johannes Climacus: Indirect Communication and the Art of ‘Taking Away’.Paul Muench - 2003 - In Poul Houe & Gordon D. Marino (eds.), Søren Kierkegaard and the Word(s). Reitzel.
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  3. Kierkegaard's Socratic Point of View.Paul Muench - 2007 - Kierkegaardiana 24:132-162.
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  4. Robert L. Perkins , International Kierkegaard Commentary: Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments.Paul Muench - 2000 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 47 (2):124-127.
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  5. Thinking Death Into Every Moment: The Existence-Problem of Dying in Kierkegaard’s Postscript.Paul Muench - 2011 - In Patrick Stokes & Adam Buben (eds.), Kierkegaard and Death. Indiana University Press.
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  6. Kierkegaard's Socratic Point of View.Paul Muench - 2006; rev. 2009 - In Sara Ahbel-Rappe & Rachana Kamtekar (eds.), Kierkegaardiana. Blackwell.
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  7. Understanding Kierkegaard’s Johannes Climacus in the Postscript.Paul Muench - 2007 - In Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Hermann Deuser & K. Brian Söderquist (eds.), Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook. de Gruyter. pp. 424-440.
    In this paper I take issue with James Conant’s claim that Johannes Climacus seeks to engage his reader in the Postscript by himself enacting the confusions to which he thinks his reader is prone. I contend that Conant’s way of reading the Postscript fosters a hermeneutic of suspicion that leads him (and those who follow his approach) to be unduly suspicious of some of Climacus’ philosophical activity. I argue that instead of serving as a mirror of his reader’s faults, Climacus (...)
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  8. Socrates' Life of Irony (1998).Paul Muench - manuscript
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  9. Review of Alastair Hannay (Trans.), Concluding Unscientific Postscript. [REVIEW]Paul Muench - 2010 - Søren Kierkegaard Newsletter 56:20-23.
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  10. Kierkegaard's Socratic Pseudonym: A Profile of Johannes Climacus.Paul Muench - 2010 - In Rick Anthony Furtak (ed.), Kierkegaard's 'Concluding Unscientific Postscript': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
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  11. The Analogy Between Psychoanalysis and Wittgenstein's Later Philosophical Methods.Paul Muench - 1993 - Dissertation, University of Oxford
    Wittgenstein’s analogy between psychoanalysis and his later philosophical methods is explored and developed. Historical evidence supports the claim that Wittgenstein characterized an early version of his general remarks on philosophy (§§89-133 in the Philosophical Investigations) as a sustained comparison with psychoanalysis. A non-adversarial, therapeutic interpretation is adopted towards Wittgenstein which emphasizes his focus on dissolving the metaphysical puzzlement of particular troubled individuals. A “picture” of Freudian psychoanalysis is sketched which highlights several features of Freud’s therapeutic techniques and his conception of (...)
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  12. Kierkegaard's Socratic Task.Paul Muench - 2006 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    The Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) conceived of himself as the Socrates of nineteenth century Copenhagen. Having devoted the bulk of his first major work, *The Concept of Irony with Continual Reference to Socrates*, to the problem of the historical Socrates, Kierkegaard maintained at the end of his life that it is to Socrates that we must turn if we are to understand his own philosophical undertaking: "The only analogy I have before me is Socrates; my task is a Socratic (...)
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