Results for 'disenchantment'

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  1.  39
    Modernity, Madness, Disenchantment: Don Quixote's Hunger.Rebecca Gould - 2011 - Symploke 19 (1):35-53.
    This essay considers the relation between Don Quixote's hunger and the disenchantment (Entzauberung) that Max Weber understood as paradigmatic of the modern condition. Whereas hunger functions within a Hegelian dialectic of desire in Cervantes' novel, literary representations of hunger from later periods (in Kafka and post-Holocaust Polish poetry) acknowledge the cosmic insignificance of human need by substituting the desire for recognition with a desire for self-abdication. While Don Quixote's hunger drives him to seek recognition for his dream world, modern (...)
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  2. Disenchantment and Modernity: The Mirror of Technique.Ian H. Angus - 1983 - Human Studies 6 (1):141 - 166.
    A critical analysis of Alfred Schuetz' conception of rationality based upon Edmund Husserl's phenomenology.
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  3.  64
    Leo Tolstoy’s tragic death and his impacts on Max Weber and György Lukács: On autonomy of arts and science/ O tema da morte trágica de Liev Tolstói e set impacto em Max Weber e György Lukács: Sobre a autonomia nas ciências e na arte.Luis F. Roselino - 2014 - Revista História E Cultura 3 (1):150-171.
    The tragic death in Tolstoy's writings has helped both Max Weber and György Lukács in characterizing the modern pathos as a tragic contemplation of the emptiness of life. Through Tolstoy's readings, Weber and Lukács found an interesting source of denying arts and modern sciences autonomy, considering, from the aesthetics sphere, the meaningless of this new immanent reality. Both has assumed Tolstoy main theme from the same perspective, contrasting ancient and modern worldviews. Max Weber presented this theme in his disenchantment (...)
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  4. Deflating Metaphors and Emerging Contexts: Messing with Your Mind in a Material World.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2012 - In Natasha Bullock & Alexie Glass-Kantor (eds.), Adelaide Biennial 2012 Catalogue, Parallel Collisions. Art Gallery of South Australia. pp. 194-98.
    A discussion of the way the visual artists represented in Adelaide’s 2012 Biennale draw attention to new conceptions of place, time and self which highlight the contingent nature of the narratives that underlie our day to day existence. Disenchantment or re-enchantment are increasingly redundant conceptions. Such narratives are always fluid. Among the ebbs and flows, new conceptions emerge, providing in effect new ways of being in the world, and in turn prompting a reshuffling of what we thought we knew.
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  5. Naturalism and the Space of Reasons in Mind and World.T. H. Ho - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (1):49-62.
    This paper aims to show that many criticisms of McDowell’s naturalism of second nature are based on what I call ‘the orthodox interpretation’ of McDowell’s naturalism. The orthodox interpretation is, however, a misinterpretation, which results from the fact that the phrase ‘the space of reasons’ is used equivocally by McDowell in Mind and World. Failing to distinguish two senses of ‘the space of reasons’, I argue that the orthodox interpretation renders McDowell’s naturalism inconsistent with McDowell’s Hegelian thesis that the conceptual (...)
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  6. Nature and the Good: An Exploration of Ancient Ethical Naturalism in Cicero’s De Finibus.Juan Pablo Bermúdez-Rey - 2011 - Pensamiento y Cultura 14 (2):145-163.
    This paper investigates the differences between ancient Greek and modern ethical naturalism, through the account of the whole classical tradition provided by Cicero in De finibus bonorum et malorum. Ever since Hume’s remarks on the topic, it is usually held that derivations of normative claims from factual claims require some kind of proper justification. It ́s a the presence of such justifications in the Epicurean, Stoic, and Academic-Peripatetic ethical theories (as portrayed in De finibus), and, after a negative conclusion, I (...)
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  7. Art-Matrix Theory and Cognitive Distance: Farago, Preziosi, and Gell on Art and Enchantment.Jakub Stejskal - 2015 - Journal of Art Historiography 13:1-18.
    Recent theories of art that subscribe to the view that art objects are agents enchanting their target audience, have tended to explain the operation of art objects as an agent–patient dynamic, a causal nexus of agency. They face a challenge, however, when they also aspire to embrace the idea – dominant in modernist and contemporary art theory – that the function of art is to unsettle its spectators’ habitual ways of perceiving and understanding, that is, to disenchant them: If artworks (...)
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  8.  72
    Review of Dennis Des Chene, Spirits and Clocks: Machine and Organism in Descartes. [REVIEW]John Sutton - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Science 36:233-235.
    This rangy and precise book deserves to be read even by those historians who think they are bored with Descartes. While offering surprising and detailed readings of bewildering texts like theDescription of the Human Body, Des Chene constructs a powerful, sad narrative of the Cartesian disenchantment of the body. Along the way he also delivers provocative views on topics as various as teleology, the role of illustrations in the history of mechanism, theories of the sexual differentiation of the foetus, (...)
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  9.  5
    Les Lumières Écossaises et le roman philosophique de Descartes.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2000 - In Yaron Senderowicz & Yves Wahl (eds.), Descartes: Reception and Disenchantment. Tel-Aviv, Israel: University Publishing Projects. pp. 65-88.
    The paper reconstructs the reception of Descartes's work by the Scottish Enlighteners, from Colin MacLaurin to Dugald Stewart. The Scots' image of Descartes was a byproduct of a scientific controversy; philosophical arguments were brought into the picture more as asides than as a primary focus of interest. As soon as the Cartesian physics withered away as a real alternative to Newtonian physics, only the philosophical arguments were left, with no memory of the context out of which they originated, and the (...)
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  10. Secular but Not Superficial: An Overlooked Nonreligious/Nonspiritual Identity.Daniel G. Delaney - 2016 - Dissertation, University of Louisville
    Since Durkheim’s characterization of the sacred and profane as “antagonistic rivals,” the strict dichotomy has been framed in such a way that “being religious” evokes images of a life filled with profound meaning and value, while “being secular” evokes images of a meaningless, self-centered, superficial life, often characterized by materialistic consumerism and the cold, heartless environment of corporate greed. Consequently, to identify as “neither religious nor spiritual” runs the risk of being stigmatized as superficial, untrustworthy, and immoral. Conflicts and confusions (...)
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