Results for 'frankenstein'

20 found
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  1. The Frankenstein Paradigm: More than human, less than nothing.Paulo Alexandre E. Castro - 2021 - International Journal of English Literature and Social Sciences 6 (2):35-39.
    This paper begins with the examination of some premises of Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus, and briefly revisits some of the concepts or ideas that she had adapted and that will allow to determine the premises that characterize what we named as Frankenstein Paradigm. Such a paradigm, as we suggested, allows us to perceive, on the one hand, the avant-garde vision of Mary Shelley about human condition (regardless of literary immersion in gothic subjects), and on (...)
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  2. FRANKENSTEIN OU O PROMETEU MODERNO E O PROGRESSO CIENTÍFICO.Mariana Dias Pinheiro Santos - 2021 - Desenredos 13 (36):125-135.
    Durante uma competição que envolveu Lord Byron, Polidori e Percy Shelley, numa prova de quem seria capaz de criar a melhor história de horror, nasce o rascunho de o que conhecemos hoje como Frankenstein. Aprovado e exaltado pela crítica, o novo romance de horrores, que marca o início da segunda fase do gótico, é tido por Walter Scott como uma obra que investiga as condições e implicações do conhecimento e da imaginação humana. Não é novidade que o gênero gótico (...)
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  3. Frankenstein, o los traumas de la ciencia.Aida Míguez Barciela - manuscript
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  4. Who is Dr. Frankenstein? Or, what Professor Hayek and his friends have done to science.Yuri Lazebnik - 2018 - Organisms 2 (2):9-42.
    This commentary suggests that the ongoing malaise of biomedical research results from adopting a doctrine that is incompatible with the principles of creative scientific discovery and thus should be treated as a mental rather than somatic disorder. I overview the progression of the malaise, outline the doctrine and the history of its marriage to science, formulate the diagnosis, justify it by reviewing the symptoms of the malaise, and suggest how to begin to cure the disease.
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  5. Aesthetics in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.Jerold J. Abrams - 2018 - Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy 1:1-19.
    In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein the brilliant scientist Viktor Frankenstein constructs and animates a gigantic and superhumanly powerful man. But upon animation, Frankenstein discovers he neglected beauty, and beholding his hideous creation flees in horror without even naming the man. Abandoned and alone the monster leaves society, yet secretly observing humanity learns language and philosophy and eventually discovers humanity’s self-understanding and his own self-understanding to be grounded in beauty rather than reason.
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  6. Darwin Meets Dr. Frankenstein: Using the Drake Equation to Calculate the Probability of Volcanic Lightning’s Impact on Chemical Evolution.Petar Nurkić - 2022 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (35):49-68.
    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been a paramount mechanism of interest in recent literature addressing the origins of biological evolution. However, research on lightning-triggered electroporation represents the innovative and still insufficiently grasped approach to HGT (Kotnik, 2013). On the other hand, prebiotic synthesis is a fundamental process for chemical evolution. Recently, the effects of volcanic lightning on nitrogen fixation and phosphate reduction have also been considered (NavarroGonzález and Segura, 2004). This paper aims to present a top-down approach to the question (...)
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  7. The internet: which future for organized knowledge - Frankenstein or Pygmalion, Part 2.Luciano Floridi - 1996 - The Electronic Library 14 (1):49–52.
    This paper is the second half of an invited paper given by the author to the international conference, promoted by the UNESCO Philosophy Forum, to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the organisation (Paris, 14–17 March 1995). The first half, which deals with a slightly different theme, is published as an Article earlier in this issue.
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  8. The internet: which future for organised knowledge, Frankenstein or Pygmalion? Part 1.Luciano Floridi - 1995 - International Journal of Human-Computer Studies 43 (2):261–274.
    The Internet is like a new country, with a growing population of millions of well educated citizens. If it wants to keep track of its own cultural achievements in real time, it will have to provide itself with an infostructure like a virtual National Library system. This paper proposes that institutions all over the world should take full advantage of the new technologies available, and promote and coordinate such a global service. This is essential in order to make possible a (...)
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  9. Are scientists a workforce? – Or, how Dr. Frankenstein made biomedical research sick.Yuri Lazebnik - 2015 - EMBO Reports 16 (12):1592-1600.
    A proposed plan to rescue US biomedical research from its current ‘malaise’ will not be effective as it misdiagnoses the root cause of the disease.
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  10. On Monsters: an unnatural history of our worst fears.Stephen T. Asma - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Hailed as "a feast" (Washington Post) and "a modern-day bestiary" (The New Yorker), Stephen Asma's On Monsters is a wide-ranging cultural and conceptual history of monsters--how they have evolved over time, what functions they have served for us, and what shapes they are likely to take in the future. Beginning at the time of Alexander the Great, the monsters come fast and furious--Behemoth and Leviathan, Gog and Magog, Satan and his demons, Grendel and Frankenstein, circus freaks and headless children, (...)
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  11. How to Change an Artwork.David Friedell - forthcoming - In Alex King (ed.), Philosophy and Art: New Essays at the Intersection. Oxford University Press.
    The question of how people change artworks is important for the metaphysics of art. It’s relatively easy for anyone to change a painting or sculpture, but who may change a literary or musical work is restricted and varies with context. Authors of novels and composers of symphonies often have a special power to change their artworks. Mary Shelley revised Frankenstein, and Tchaikovsky revised his Second Symphony. I cannot change these artworks. In other cases, such as those involving jazz standards (...)
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  12. The donor organ as an ‘object a’: a Lacanian perspective on organ donation and transplantation medicine.Hub Zwart - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):559-571.
    Bioethical discourse on organ donation covers a wide range of topics, from informed consent procedures and scarcity issues up to ‘transplant tourism’ and ‘organ trade’. This paper presents a ‘depth ethics’ approach, notably focussing on the tensions, conflicts and ambiguities concerning the status of the human body. These will be addressed from a psychoanalytical angle. First, I will outline Lacan’s view on embodiment as such. Subsequently, I will argue that, for organ recipients, the donor organ becomes what Lacan refers to (...)
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  13. The Promises and Perils of Central Bank Digital Currencies.Louis Larue, Clément Fontan & Joakim Sandberg - 2020 - Revue de la Régulation 28.
    This paper analyzes the proposal that central banks should issue digital currencies (CBDC) to provide a public alternative to private digital accounts and cryptocurrencies. We build on some The promises and perils of central bank digital currencies recent themes in political economy research to give a broader and more balanced perspective than the existing literature, highlighting both the promises and perils of CBDC. We argue that, on the one hand, the present state of the private financial sector is problematic and (...)
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  14. From the ethics of technology towards an ethics of knowledge policy.René von Schomberg - 2007 - AI and Society.
    My analysis takes as its point of departure the controversial assumption that contemporary ethical theories cannot capture adequately the ethical and social challenges of scientific and technological development. This assumption is rooted in the argument that classical ethical theory invariably addresses the issue of ethical responsibility in terms of whether and how intentional actions of individuals can be justified. Scientific and technological developments, however, have produced unintentional consequences and side-consequences. These consequences very often result from collective decisions concerning the way (...)
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  15. Autonomous Weapon Systems, Asymmetrical Warfare, and Myth.Michal Klincewicz - 2018 - Civitas. Studia Z Filozofii Polityki 23:179-195.
    Predictions about autonomous weapon systems are typically thought to channel fears that drove all the myths about intelligence embodied in matter. One of these is the idea that the technology can get out of control and ultimately lead to horrifi c consequences, as is the case in Mary Shelley’s classic Frankenstein. Given this, predictions about AWS are sometimes dismissed as science-fiction fear-mongering. This paper considers several analogies between AWS and other weapon systems and ultimately offers an argument that nuclear (...)
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  16. Antihumanism in the Works of E.M. Cioran and Thomas Bernhard.Bolea Stefan - 2019 - Philobiblon - Transilvanian Journal of Multidisciplinary Research in Humanities 24 (1):79-89.
    The versions of Nietzschean and Cioranian Antihumanism start from different presuppositions than Foucault’s Antihumanism, adding misanthropy to their nihilistic project. The Cioranian term of the not-man, a darker counterpart to Nietzsche’s Übermensch, can be “tested” through forays into the Romantic and Post-romantic literature, considering for instance Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818), Maupassant’s “Horla” (1887), Lorrain’s “The Possessed” (1895) or the poems of Lautréamont. In this paper we compare Cioran’s Antihumanism with the nihilism of Thomas Bernhard’s first novel, Frost (1963).
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  17. Of Hatred and Solitude in the Works of Mary Shelley and E. M. Cioran.Bolea Stefan - 2017 - Philobiblon - Transilvanian Journal of Multidisciplinary Research in Humanities 22 (2):105-116.
    Despite the fact that Mary Shelley and E. M. Cioran have never been previously analyzed in the same context (they belong not only to different ages but also to divergent genres), we will find that they share at least two similar themes. The motif of solitude, common among Romantic poets (Coleridge, Byron, Poe), finds a deep expression in Shelley’s Frankenstein and in Cioran’s early oeuvre. A more thorough investigation of the British novelist and the Romanian-French self-described “anti-philosopher” discloses that (...)
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  18. Ben Hewitt, Byron, Shelley, and Goethe’s Faust. An Epic Connection (London: Legenda, 2015), and Wayne Deakin, Hegel and the English Romantic Tradition (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015). [REVIEW]Jennifer Mensch - 2016 - Keats-Shelly Journal 65:168-171.
    In Byron, Shelley, and Goethe’s Faust, author Ben Hewitt has provided us with a carefully done and convincing study. Given this, it would have been interesting to see Hewitt’s effort to integrate Mary Shelley’s work into his narrative. Apart from any similarities between Faust and Frankenstein, it bears remembering that Goethe himself remained unconvinced by efforts to clearly demarcate works as “tragic” or “epic”; a fact that becomes especially clear in the number of works he’d devoted to rewriting the (...)
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  19. Byung-Chul Han o el arte de hacerse famoso.Gabriel Leiva Rubio - 2022 - Critica 7 (Corea):141-145.
    Una primera recomendación para arrancar la lectura de cualquier obra de Byung-Chul Han es saber que no hay ahí, metodológicamente hablando, principio o final alguno. No existe eso de “léete tal libro suyo que de ahí en adelante entenderás todo con mucha más claridad”, o aquel otro consejo de “a partir de tal idea puedes conectar las partes con el todo”. No. En la acaparadora obra de Han no hay nada de eso. Por el contrario, toda su producción intelectual parece (...)
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  20. Cavendish, van Helmont, and the mad raging womb.Jacqueline Broad - 2011 - In Judy A. Hayden (ed.), The New Science and Women’s Literary Discourse: Prefiguring Frankenstein. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 47-63.
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