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  1. An African Response to the Philosophical Crises in Medicine: Towards an African Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics.Chrysogonus M. Okwenna - 2021 - Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions 10 (2):1-16.
    In this paper, I identify two major philosophical crises confronting medicine as a global phenomenon. The first crisis is the epistemological crisis of adopting an epistemic attitude, adequate for improving medical knowledge and practice. The second is the ethical crisis, also known as the “quality-of-care crisis,” arising from the traditional patient-physician dyad. I acknowledge the different proposals put forward in the quest for solutions to these crises. However, I observe that most of these proposals remain inadequate given their over-reliance on (...)
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  2. Review of "Paulin Hountondji: African Philosophy as Critical Universalism" by Franziska Dübgen and Stefan Skupien. [REVIEW]Zeyad El Nabolsy - 2020 - Marx and Philosophy Review of Books 2020:1-7.
    Franziska Dübgen and Stefan Skupien have written a much needed overview of Paulin Hountondji’s work. While Hountondji is quite well known for his critique of ethnophilosophy, his later intellectual work on scientific dependency and his political writings are not as well known to non-specialist Anglophone readers. This partially stems from the fact that while his later work on scientific dependency has been translated into English, it has been published in the form of short articles or through transcribed interviews, which makes (...)
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  3. Confucian Harmony in Dialogue with African Harmony.Chenyang Li - 2016 - African and Asian Studies 1 (2):1-10.
    Engaging in dialogue with African philosophy, I respond to questions raised by Thaddeus Metz on characteristics of Confucian philosophy in comparison with African philosophy. First, in both Confucian philosophy and African philosophy, harmony/harmonization and self-realization coincide in the process of person-making. Second, Confucians accept that sometimes it is inevitable to sacrifice individual components in order to achieve or maintain harmony at large scales; the point is how to minimize such costs. Third, Confucians give family love a central place in the (...)
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  4. Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions.Jonathan Chimakonam - 2014 - Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions 3 (1):1-167.
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  5. Engaging with the Philosophy of D A Masolo.Thaddeus Metz - 2013 - Quest 25:7-15.
    This is an introduction to the special issue of Quest devoted to D. A. Masolo’s latest book, Self and Community in a Changing World. It situates this book in relation to not only Masolo’s earlier research on African philosophy but also the field more generally, sketches the central positions of the contributions to the journal issue, and in light of them makes some critical recommendations for future reflection.
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  6. Odera Oruka's Philisophic Sagacity: Problems and Challenges of Conservation Method in African Philosophy.G. Azenabor - 2011 - Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):69-86.
    This paper examines the implications and challenges of Odera Oruka’s conversation approach to the study of contemporary African philosophy as enunciated in his “Philosophic sagacity”. In Oruka’s method, African philosophy is conceived as a joint venture and product of both the ancient and modern Africanphilosophers. Consequently, it utilizes interview, discussion and dialogue.
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  7. Perverse and Necessary Dialogues in African Philosophy 1 Perverse and Necessary Dialogues in African Philosophy.Jennifer Lisa Vest - 2009 - Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 1 (2):1-23.
    This article examines the concerns and debates that have arisen in African philosophy over the last few decades, and asks whether it continues to be necessary for African philosophy to take on what the author calls “perverse questions” or “perverse preoccupations” with the West. The author argues that to engage and respond to questions about the intellectual capabilities of African thinkers or the possible existence of philosophical resources in African cultures is to respond to perverse questions. To engage in academic (...)
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  8. Some Methodological Issues in the History of African Philosophy.Adeshina Afolayan - 2006 - In Olusegun Oladipo (ed.), Core Issues in African Philosophy. Hope Publications. pp. 21--40.
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  9. Negritude and Bergsonism.Messay Kebede - 2003 - African Philosophy (3):01-18.
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  10. African Sage Philosophy and Socrates: Midwifery and Method.Gail M. Presbey - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):177-192.
    The paper explores the methodology and goals of H. Odera Oruka’s sage philosophy project. Oruka interviewed wise persons who were mostly illiterate and from the rural areas of Kenya to show that a long tradition of critical thinking and philosophizing exists in Africa, even if there is no written record. His descriptions of the role of the academic philosopher turned interviewer varied, emphasizing their refraining from imposition of their own views, their adding their own ideas, or their midwifery in helping (...)
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  11. Is Elijah Masinde a Sage-Philosopher? The Dispute Between H. Odera Oruka and Chaungo Barasa.Gail Presbey - 1997 - In Kai Kresse & Anke Graness (eds.), Sagacious Reasoning: Henry Odera Oruka in Memoriam. Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Peter Lang Verlag. pp. 195-209.
    A constant question that arises when study in H. Odera Oruka's sage philosophy project is, who is a sage? What attributes are necessary? While Oruka tried to provide criteria for categorization of folk and philosophical sages, some critics note that the criteria is not clear, or not clearly applied. This paper focuses on Elijah Masinde, a Kenyan prophet who agitated against British colonialism in Kenya. The question of whether or not Masinde was a sage was debated by H. Odera Oruka (...)
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  12. African Sage-Philosophers in Action: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Narrowly Academic Role of the Philosopher.Gail Presbey - 1996 - Essence: An International Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):29-41.
    I argue that Oruka’s sages, half of whom were described as arbiters and judges called upon to solve disputes, fulfill Plato’s ideal of a philosopher as a respected, wise thinker who works for the betterment of society. Although the sage has been sidelined in modern academia, even in Africa, Oruka suggests that twentieth-century rural Kenyan sages, with their devotion to community benefit and conversation about practical concerns, are role models for modern Western philosophy, because philosophers everywhere have a duty to (...)
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  13. Ways in Which Oral Philosophy is Superior to Written Philosophy: A Look at Odera Oruka’s Rural Sages.Gail Presbey - 1996 - APA Newsletter on Philosophy and the Black Experience 1996 (Fall):6-10.
    The paper is about H. Odera Oruka's Sage Philosophy project. Oruka interviewed rural sages of Kenya, saying that like Socrates, these wise elders had been philosophizing without writing anything down. Paulin Hountondji (at the time) criticized efforts of oral philosophizing, saying that Africa needed a written tradition of philosophizing. Some philosophers were representatives of an "individualist" position which says that philosophical ideas must be attributed to specific named individuals. Kwame Gyekye instead argued that anonymous community wisdom of Africans had indeed (...)
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  14. The Question of African Philosophy.P. O. Bodunrin - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (216):161 - 179.
    Philosophy in Africa has for more than a decade now been dominated by the discussion of one compound question, namely, is there an African philosophy, and if there is, what is it? The first part of the question has generally been unhesitatingly answered in the affirmative. Dispute has been primarily over the second part of the question as various specimens of African philosophy presented do not seem to pass muster. Those of us who refuse to accept certain specimens as philosophy (...)
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