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  1. Placing Nyāya Epistemology Properly in the Western Tradition.Proyash Sarkar - 2003 - In Srilekha Datta & Amita Chatterjee (eds.), Some Philosophical Issues in Indian Logic. Centre of Advanced Study in Philosophy, Jadavpur University in Collaboration with Allied Publishers, New Delhi.
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Indian Logic, Misc
  1. Definitional Dictionary of Logic.Desh Raj Sirswal - manuscript
    DEFINITIONAL DICTIONARY OF LOGIC -/- 2009 -/- Complied by -/- Dr Desh Raj Sirswal -/- .
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  2. The Vindication of Tarka as a Pramāṇa in Jaina Philosophy.Arvind Jaiswal - 2019 - Śramaṇa 69 (1):61-68.
    This paper encapsulates the debate as to whether or not tarka is an additional source of knowledge. In this regard, Jaina thinkers opine that they are, unlike Buddhists and Nyāya thinkers, an additional source of knowledge, for what we come to know through tarka is not known through any other means of knowledge. En route, Jaina’s understanding of tarka is put forth, thereafter their criticism of others’ understanding is supplied. Eventually, some recent discussions over this debate are intimated that seem (...)
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  3. A One-Valued Logic for Non-One-Sidedness.Fabien Schang - 2013 - International Journal of Jaina Studies 9 (1):1-25.
    Does it make sense to employ modern logical tools for ancient philosophy? This well-known debate2 has been re-launched by the indologist Piotr Balcerowicz, questioning those who want to look at the Eastern school of Jainism with Western glasses. While plainly acknowledging the legitimacy of Balcerowicz's mistrust, the present paper wants to propose a formal reconstruction of one of the well-known parts of the Jaina philosophy, namely: the saptabhangi, i.e. the theory of sevenfold predication. Before arguing for this formalist approach to (...)
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  4. Recapture, Transparency, Negation and a Logic for the Catuskoti.Adrian Kreutz - 2019 - Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):67-92.
    The recent literature on Nāgārjuna’s catuṣkoṭi centres around Jay Garfield’s (2009) and Graham Priest’s (2010) interpretation. It is an open discussion to what extent their interpretation is an adequate model of the logic for the catuskoti, and the Mūla-madhyamaka-kārikā. Priest and Garfield try to make sense of the contradictions within the catuskoti by appeal to a series of lattices – orderings of truth-values, supposed to model the path to enlightenment. They use Anderson & Belnaps's (1975) framework of First Degree Entailment. (...)
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  5. Buddhist Philosophy of Logic.Koji Tanaka - 2013 - In Steven Michael Emmanuel (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 320-330.
    Logic in Buddhist Philosophy concerns the systematic study of anumāna (often translated as inference) as developed by Dignāga (480-540 c.e.) and Dharmakīti (600-660 c.e.). Buddhist logicians think of inference as an instrument of knowledge (pramāṇa) and, thus, logic is considered to constitute part of epistemology in the Buddhist tradition. According to the prevalent 20th and early 21st century ‘Western’ conception of logic, however, logical study is the formal study of arguments. If we understand the nature of logic to be formal, (...)
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  6. The Cow is to Be Tied Up: Sort-Shifting in Classical Indian Philosophy.Keating Malcolm - 2013 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (4):311-332.
    This paper undertakes textual exegesis and rational reconstruction of Mukula Bhaṭṭa’s Abhidhā-vṛttta-mātṛkā, or “The Fundamentals of the Communicative Function.” The treatise was written to refute Ānandavardhana’s claim, made in the Dhvanyāloka, that there is a third “power” of words, vyañjanā (suggestion), beyond the two already accepted by traditional Indian philosophy: abhidhā (denotation) and lakṣaṇā(indication).1 I argue that the explanation of lakṣaṇā as presented in his text contains internal tensions, although it may still be a compelling response to Ānandavardhana.
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  7. Reconsidering Classical Indian Thoughts.Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) - 2011 - Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    Recent years have seen the beginning of a radical reassessment of the philosophical literature of ancient and classical India. The analytical techniques of contemporary philosophy are being deployed towards a fresh and original interpretation of the texts. This rational rather than mystical approach towards Indian philosophical theories has resulted in a need to work which explains afresh its central methods, courses and devices. It is with this spirit of thought and background that I want to publish a book to discuss (...)
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  8. Methods of Philosophical Inquiry in Upanishads.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2012 - International Journal of Multidisciplinary Educational Research 1 (2):57-62.
    Philosophy is a subject which does not concerned only to an expert or specialist. It appears that there is probably no human being who does not philosophise. Good philosophy expands one’s imagination as some philosophy is close to us, whoever we are. Then of course some is further away, and some is further still, and some is very alien indeed. We raise questions about the assumptions, presuppositions, or definitions upon which a field of inquiry is based, and these questions can (...)
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  9. Place of Logic in Indian Philosophy.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2015 - Lokayata: Journal of Positive Philosophy 2:39-49.
    The title of the present paper might arouse some curiosity among the minds of the readers. The very first question that arises in this respect is whether India produced any logic in the real sense of the term as has been used in the West. This paper is centered only on the three systems of Indian philosophy namely Nyāya, Buddhism and Jainism. We have been talking of Indian philosophy, Indian religion, Indian culture and Indian spirituality, but not that which are (...)
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