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  1. added 2020-06-30
    Epicurean Philosophy and Its Parts.Clerk Shaw - 2020 - In Kelly Arenson (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy. pp. 13-24.
    This chapter offers an overview of the Epicurean conception of philosophy, with special attention to the value of physics. The Epicureans value physics not only for its ability to help remove superstitious beliefs about the gods and death, but also for its ability to stabilize our beliefs and to give causal accounts of ethically-relevant kinds such as pleasure and desire.
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  2. added 2019-06-05
    Tsouna, Voula . The Ethics of Philodemus . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007 . Pp. 280. $72.00 (Cloth).Rachel Barney - 2010 - Ethics 120 (2):422-426.
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  3. added 2016-02-24
    Lucretius and the Fears of Death.Peter Aronoff - 1997 - Dissertation, Cornell University
    The Epicureans argued that death was nothing to us and that we should not fear death, and this thesis takes up these arguments as they appear in our fullest extant source, the De Rerum Natura of Lucretius. After an initial look at the general Epicurean theory of emotions, the thesis narrows in on the fears of death. Lucretius starts from a popular dichotomy concerning death: death is either the utter destruction of the person who dies, or the person survives in (...)
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  4. added 2015-08-03
    Epicurean Wills, Empty Hopes, and the Problem of Post Mortem Concern.Bill Wringe - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):289-315.
    Many Epicurean arguments for the claim that death is nothing to us depend on the ‘Experience Constraint’: the claim that something can only be good or bad for us if we experience it. However, Epicurus’ commitment to the Experience Constraint makes his attitude to will-writing puzzling. How can someone who accepts the Experience Constraint be motivated to bring about post mortem outcomes?We might think that an Epicurean will-writer could be pleased by the thought of his/her loved ones being provided for (...)
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  5. added 2013-08-31
    V. Tsouna, The Ethics of Philodemus. [REVIEW]J. Clerk Shaw - 2010 - Polis 27:50-54.
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