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Human Rights in Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry

Cambridge University Press (2002)

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  1. Confucianism, Democracy, and the Virtue of Deference.Aaron Stalnaker - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):441-459.
    Some democratic theorists have argued that contemporary people should practice only a civility that recognizes others as equal persons, and eschew any form of deference to authority as a feudalistic cultural holdover that ought to be abandoned in the modern era. Against such views, this essay engages early Confucian views of ethics and society, including their analyses of different sorts of authority and status, in order to argue that, properly understood, deference is indeed a virtue of considerable importance for contemporary (...)
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  • Why Early Confucianism Cannot Generate Democracy.David Elstein - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):427-443.
    A central issue in Chinese philosophy today is the relationship between Confucianism and democracy. While some political figures have argued that Confucian values justify non-democratic forms of government, many scholars have argued that Confucianism can provide justification for democracy, though this Confucian democracy will differ substantially from liberal democracy. These scholars believe it is important for Chinese culture to develop its own conception of democracy using Confucian values, drawn mainly from Kongzi (Confucius) and Mengzi (Mencius), as the basis. This essay (...)
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  • Postmodern Theory and Truth: An Attempt at Reconciliation.Rein Raud - 2019 - Tandf: Comparative and Continental Philosophy 11 (1):48-60.
    Volume 11, Issue 1, March 2019, Page 48-60.
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  • Whole Set of Volume 1 No 1 (2010) of Comparative Philosophy.Bo Mou - 2010 - Comparative Philosophy 1 (1).
    Whole Set of Contents of Current Issue (for cross-reference reading and hard-copy preservation of the whole issue).
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  • The Minimal Definition and Methodology of Comparative Philosophy: A Report From a Conference [Abstract].Stephen C. Angle - 2010 - Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):106.
    In June of 2008, the International Society for Comparative Studies of Chinese and Western Philosophy (ISCWP) convened its third Constructive Engagement conference, on the theme of “Comparative Philosophy Methodology.” During the opening speeches, Prof. Dunhua ZHAO, Chair of the Philosophy Department at Peking University, challenged the conference’s participants to put forward a minimal definition of “comparative philosophy” and a statement of its methods. Based on the papers from the conference and the extensive discussion that ensued, during my closing reflections at (...)
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  • Must We Choose Our Leaders? Human Rights and Political Participation in China.Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):177 – 196.
    The essay begins from Alan Gewirth's influential account of human rights, and specifically with his argument that the human right to political participation can only be fulfilled by competitive, liberal democracy. I show that his argument rests on empirical, rather than conceptual grounds, which opens the possibility that in China, alternative forms of participation may be legitimate or even superior. An examination of the theory and contemporary practice of 'democratic centralism' shows that while it does not now adequately support the (...)
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  • Reply to Critics.Stephen C. Angle - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):381-388.
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  • A Human Rights Debate on Physical Security, Political Liberty, and the Confucian Tradition.Benedict S. B. Chan - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):567-588.
    There are many East and West debates on human rights. One of them is whether all civil and political rights are human rights. On one hand, scholars generally agree that rights to physical security are human rights. On the other hand, some scholars argue that rights to political liberty are only Western rights but not human rights because political liberty conflicts with some East Asian cultural factors, especially the Confucian tradition. I argue that physical security also conflicts with some parts (...)
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  • The Normative Justification of Traditional Chinese Authoritarianism.Michael Ng-Quinn - 2006 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (3):379-397.
    (2006). The Normative Justification of Traditional Chinese Authoritarianism. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 9, No. 3, pp. 379-397.
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  • Are International Human Rights Universal? – East-West Philosophical Debates on Human Rights to Liberty and Health.Benedict S. B. Chan - 2019 - In Luca Di Donato & Elisa Grimi (eds.), Metaphysics of Human Rights 1948-2018: On the Occasion of the 70th Anniversary of the UDHR. Málaga, Spain: pp. 135-152.
    In philosophical debates on human rights between the East and the West, scholars argue whether rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and other international documents (in short, “international human rights”) are universal or culturally relative. Some scholars who emphasize the importance of East Asian cultures (such as the Confucian tradition) have different attitudes toward civil and political rights (CP rights) than toward economic, social, and cultural rights (ESC Rights). They argue that at least some international human rights (...)
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  • Inclusive Versus Exclusive Public Reason: Invitation to Comparative Political Philosophy or the Affirmation of “Liberal Hegemony”.Mariusz Turowski - 2016 - Synthesis Philosophica 31 (1):151-167.
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  • Contemporary Confucian and Islamic Approaches to Democracy and Human Rights.Stephen Angle - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):7-41.
    Both Confucian and Islamic traditions stand in fraught and internally contested relationships with democracy and human rights. It can easily appear that the two traditions are in analogous positions with respect to the values associated with modernity, but a central contention of this essay is that Islam and Confucianism are not analogous in this way. Positions taken by advocates of the traditions are often similar, but the reasoning used to justify these positions differs in crucial ways. Whether one approaches these (...)
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  • Confucian Ritual and Modern Civility.Eske Møllgaard - 2012 - Journal of Global Ethics 8 (2-3):227-237.
    The Confucian notion of civility has for thousands of years guided all aspects of socio-ethical life in East Asia. Confucians express their central concern for civility in their notion of li, which is commonly translated ?ritual? and refers to the conventions and courtesies through which we submit to the socio-ethical order, as we do, for example, in performing sacrifices, weddings, and funerals, and various daily acts of deference. Since the rise of China and other East Asian countries as economic powers, (...)
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  • Song-Ming Confucianism.Justin Tiwald - 2020 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    An overview of Confucianism in the Song, Yuan, and Ming dynasties, which many regard as second only to the classical period in philosophical importance and influence. This piece canvasses the major thinkers and schools, competing views on the metaphysics of li (pattern, principle) and qi (vital stuff), criticisms of Buddhism and Daoism, and debates about the heartmind, virtue, knowledge, and governance.
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  • Human Rights Ideology as Endemic in Chinese Philosophy: Classical Confucian and Mohist Perspectives.Haiming Wen & William Keli’I. Akina - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (4):387-413.
    This article counters the popular misunderstanding that China lacks a conception of human rights in its philosophical heritage. The authors demonstrate that even divergent traditions such as Classical Confucianism and Mohism provide strong and pervasive antecedents for human rights ideology, and both have much to contribute to the contemporary Chinese articulation of human rights theory and practice. The first part of the article shows that traditional Confucian values have the capacity to produce a social environment in which rights outcomes are (...)
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  • The Discovery of Chinese Logic. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2012 - History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (3):293-296.
    History and Philosophy of Logic, Volume 33, Issue 3, Page 293-296, August 2012.
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  • Chinese Ethics.David Wong - 2008 - In Edward Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Comparative Philosophy: Chinese and Western.David Wong - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Democracy in Confucianism.Sor-Hoon Tan - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (5):293-303.
    Confucianism’s long historical association with despotism has cast doubts on its compatibility with democracy, and raise questions about its relevance in contemporary societies increasingly dominated by democratic aspirations. “Confucian democracy” has been described as a “contradiction in terms” and Asian politicians have appropriated Confucianism to justify resistance to liberalization and democratization. There has been a lively debate over the question of whether democracy can be found in Confucianism, from ancient texts such as the Analects and Mencius, to Confucian institutions such (...)
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