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  1. Chreods, Homeorhesis and Biofields: Finding the Right Path for Science.Arran Gare - 2017 - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 131:61-91.
    C.H. Waddington’s concepts of ‘chreods’ (canalized paths of development) and ‘homeorhesis’ (the tendency to return to a path), each associated with ‘morphogenetic fields’, were conceived by him as a contribution to complexity theory. Subsequent developments in complexity theory have largely ignored Waddington’s work and efforts to advance it. Waddington explained the development of the concept of chreod as the influence on his work of Alfred North Whitehead’s process philosophy, notably, the concept of concrescence as a self-causing process. Processes were recognized (...)
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  • The Powers of the False: Reading, Writing, Thinking Beyond Truth and Fiction.Doro Wiese - 2014 - Northwestern University Press.
    Can literature make it possible to represent histories that are otherwise ineffable? Making use of the Deleuzian concept of “the powers of the false,” Doro Wiese offers readings of three novels that deal with the Shoah, with colonialism, and with racialized identities. She argues that Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything Is Illuminated, Richard Flanagan’s Gould’s Book of Fish, and Richard Powers’s The Time of Our Singing are novels in which a space for unvoiced, silent, or silenced difference is created. Seen through (...)
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  • Philosophy and Science: Critique of Bergson’s Use of Boltzmann’s Argument Against the Reversibility of the Universe.Ronald Durán - 2019 - Filosofia Unisinos 20 (3).
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  • Beyond Desartes and Newton: Recovering Life and Humanity.Stuart A. Kauffman & Arran Gare - 2015 - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 119 (3):219-244.
    Attempts to ‘naturalize’ phenomenology challenge both traditional phenomenology and traditional approaches to cognitive science. They challenge Edmund Husserl’s rejection of naturalism and his attempt to establish phenomenology as a foundational transcendental discipline, and they challenge efforts to explain cognition through mainstream science. While appearing to be a retreat from the bold claims made for phenomenology, it is really its triumph. Naturalized phenomenology is spearheading a successful challenge to the heritage of Cartesian dualism. This converges with the reaction against Cartesian thought (...)
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  • Convention: Poincaré and Some of His Critics.Yemima Ben-Menahem - 2001 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (3):471-513.
    This paper offers an interpretation of Poincaré's conventionalism, distinguishing it from the Duhem–Quine thesis, on the one hand, and, on the other, from the logical positivist understanding of conventionalism as a general account of necessary truth. It also confronts Poincaré's conventionalism with some counter-arguments that have been influential: Einstein's (general) relativistic argument, and the linguistic rejoinders of Quine and Davidson. In the first section, the distinct roles played by the inter-translatability of different geometries, the inaccessibility of space to direct observation, (...)
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  • Por Que Revisitar o Debate Entre Bergson E Einstein?1.Márcio Barreto - 2016 - Trans/Form/Ação 39 (1):77-92.
    RESUMO: Bergson e Einstein participaram de uma conferência no Collège de France, em Paris, no mês de abril de 1922. Muitos desencontros entre o físico e o filósofo, no que diz respeito à questão do tempo, são já superados, se considerarmos a existência de processos dinâmicos instáveis, mas ainda permanece atual a questão da interioridade do tempo à ciência e, portanto, a possibilidade de retomada da complementaridade entre a ciência e a metafísica, proposta por Bergson, como necessária para a compreensão (...)
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  • Duality Without Dualism.Timothy Eastman - 2004 - In T. E. Eastman & H. Keeton (eds.), Physics and Whitehead: Quantum, Process, and Experience. Suny Press. pp. 14--30.
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  • The “Concept of Time” and the “Being of the Clock”: Bergson, Einstein, Heidegger, and the Interrogation of the Temporality of Modernism. [REVIEW]David Scott - 2006 - Continental Philosophy Review 39 (2):183-213.
    The topic to be addressed in this paper, that is, the distinction between the “concept” of time and the being of the clock, divides into two parts: first, in the debate between Albert Einstein and Henri Bergson, one discovers the ground for the diverging concepts of time characterized by physics in its opposing itself to philosophy. Bergson’s durée or “duration” in opposition to Einstein’s ‘physicist’s time’ as ‘public time,’ one can argue, sets the terms for Martin Heidegger’s extending, his ontological (...)
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  • Assessing Evolutionary Epistemology.Michael Bradie - 1986 - Biology and Philosophy 1 (4):401-459.
    There are two interrelated but distinct programs which go by the name evolutionary epistemology. One attempts to account for the characteristics of cognitive mechanisms in animals and humans by a straightforward extension of the biological theory of evolution to those aspects or traits of animals which are the biological substrates of cognitive activity, e.g., their brains, sensory systems, motor systems, etc. (EEM program). The other program attempts to account for the evaluation of ideas, scientific theories and culture in general by (...)
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  • On the Origin of 'Phenomenological' Sociology.Ilja Srubar - 1984 - Human Studies 7 (3-4):163 - 189.
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  • From Time Atoms to Space-Time Quantization: The Idea of Discrete Time, Ca 1925–1936.Helge Kragh & Bruno Carazza - 1994 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (3):437-462.
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  • Bergson's Philosophy of Memory.Trevor Perri - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (12):837-847.
    Bergson identifies multiple forms of memory throughout his work. In Matter and Memory, Bergson considers memory from the perspectives of both psychology and metaphysics, and he describes what we might refer to as contraction memory, perception memory, habit memory, recollection memory, and pure memory. Further, in subsequent works, Bergson discusses at least two additional forms of memory – namely, a memory of the present and a non-intellectual memory of the will. However, it is often not clear how these different forms (...)
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  • Does Time Differ From Change? Philosophical Appraisal of the Problem of Time in Quantum Gravity and in Physics.Alexis de Saint-Ours - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 52 (Part A):48-54.
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  • On the Origin of ‘Phenomenological’ Sociology.Ilja Srubar - 1984 - Human Studies 7 (1-4):163-189.
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  • The Unity of Events: Whitehead and Two Critics, Russell and Bergson.Pierre Cassou-Noguès - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):545-559.
    The aim of this paper is to discuss the philosophical premises of Whitehead's definition of time in _The Concept of Nature and other works of the same period. Whitehead probably introduced this definition, which depends on what he calls the "method of extensive abstraction," in 1913, just after the publication of the _Principia Mathematica with Russell. He only published his results in 1919. However, Russell takes up the method, with slight modifications, after personal communication with Whitehead, as soon as 1914, (...)
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  • Book Review. [REVIEW]Timothy E. Eastman & Evan Fales - 1984 - Foundations of Physics 14 (1):89-99.
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