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  1. Does Corporate Social Responsibility Affect Generation Z Purchase Intention in the Food Industry.Man Chung Wong - forthcoming - Asian Journal of Business Ethics.
    Corporate social responsibility becomes more and more prevalent in the business world and is considered as one of the factors to make purchase intentions by customers. Thus, corporations are obliged to implement CSR initiatives to attract their customers. Generation Z is born in the world with the internet and social media. They are more able to handle technology and reply on the internet or social media to receive or search for information. They are more concerned with social issues or environmental (...)
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  • The Link Between Social Movements and Corporate Social Initiatives: Toward a Multi-Level Theory.Panayiotis Georgallis - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (4):735-751.
    This article offers a first step toward a multi-level theory linking social movements to corporate social initiatives. In particular, building on the premise that social movements reflect ideologies that direct behavior inside and outside organizations, this essay identifies mechanisms by which social movements induce firms to engage with social issues. First, social movements are able to influence the expectations that key stakeholders have about firms’ social responsibility, making corporate social initiatives more attractive. Second, through conflict or collaboration, they shape firms’ (...)
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  • Isolated Environmental Cues and Product Efficacy Penalties: The Color Green and Eco-Labels.Ethan Pancer, Lindsay McShane & Theodore J. Noseworthy - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):159-177.
    The current work examines how cues traditionally used to signal environmental friendliness, specifically the color green and eco-labels, and influence product efficacy perceptions and subsequent purchase intentions. Across three experiments, we find that environmental cues used in isolation reduce perceptions of product efficacy. We argue that this efficacy discounting effect occurs because the isolated use of an environmental cue introduces category ambiguity by activating competing functionality and environmentally friendly schemas during evaluation. We discuss the implications of our findings for research (...)
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  • Deconstructing the Relationship Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance.Francesco Perrini, Angeloantonio Russo, Antonio Tencati & Clodia Vurro - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):59-76.
    For four decades, research on the role and responsibilities of business in society has centered on the business case for corporate social responsibility (CSR) and an increasing number of studies on the corporate social performance (CSP)—corporate financial performance (CFP) link emerged leading to controversial results. Heeding the call for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms linking certain CSR efforts to certain performance outcomes, this study provides a stakeholder-based organizing framework rooted in an extensive review of existing literature on the link (...)
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  • Dominant Articulations in Academic Business and Society Discourse on NGO–Business Relations: A Critical Assessment. [REVIEW]Salla Laasonen, Martin Fougère & Arno Kourula - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):521-545.
    Relations between non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and companies have been the subject of a sharply increasing amount of publications in recent years within academic business journals. In this article, we critically assess this fast-developing body of literature, which we treat as forming a ‘business and society discourse’ on NGO–business relations. Drawing on discourse theory, we examine 199 academic articles in 11 business and society, international business, and management journals. Focusing on the dominant articulations on the NGO–business relationship and key signifiers they (...)
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  • Co-creation: A Key Link Between Corporate Social Responsibility, Customer Trust, and Customer Loyalty.Oriol Iglesias, Stefan Markovic, Mehdi Bagherzadeh & Jatinder Jit Singh - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):151-166.
    In an ever more transparent, digitalized, and connected environment, customers are increasingly pressuring brands to embrace genuine corporate social responsibility practices and co-creation activities. While both CSR and co-creation are social and collaborative processes, there is still little research examining whether CSR can boost co-creation. In addition, while previous research has mainly related co-creation to emotional outcomes, limited empirical research has related it to rational and behavioral outcomes. To address these shortcomings in the literature, this paper examines the influence of (...)
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  • Fair Trade, Ethical Decision Making and the Narrative of Gender Difference.Kevin Morrell & Chanaka Jayawardhena - 2010 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 19 (4):393-407.
    Fair trade (FT) is of growing interest to those carrying out research into ethical decision making. In this paper, we report findings from a recent survey of FT purchasing among 688 retail shoppers in the United Kingdom. We examined the relationship between individual differences, in terms of gender and age, and three outcome measures: purchasing, word of mouth (WOM) recommendation and social advocacy. Though age appeared to have no significant effects, we found evidence of gender difference in each outcome measure. (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility as Cultural Meaning Management: A Critique of the Marketing of 'Ethical' Bottled Water.Vinicius Brei & Steffen Böhm - 2011 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 20 (3):233-252.
    To date, the primary focus of research in the field of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been on the strategic implications of CSR for corporations and less on an evaluation of CSR from a wider political, economic and social perspective. In this paper, we aim to address this gap by critically engaging with marketing campaigns of so-called ‘ethical’ bottled water. We especially focus on a major CSR strategy of a range of different companies that promise to provide drinking water for (...)
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  • Corporate Environmental Responsibility: A Legal Origins Perspective.Hakkon Kim, Kwangwoo Park & Doojin Ryu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (3):381-402.
    In this study, we examine the determinants of corporate environmental responsibility, as well as the relationship between legal systems and CER as measured by a unique set of global environmental cost data. Results of our analyses show that firms’ legal origins affect CER, which requires a long-term management perspective. Specifically, our results indicate that civil law firms exhibit significantly higher levels of CER than common law firms. In addition, results of an auxiliary test suggest that manager shareholding has a significant, (...)
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  • Is Femvertising the New Greenwashing? Examining Corporate Commitment to Gender Equality.Yvette Sterbenk, Sara Champlin, Kasey Windels & Summer Shelton - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    This study examined the potential for a new area of corporate social responsibility washing: gender equality. Companies are increasingly recognized for advertisements promoting gender equality, termed “femvertisements.” However, it is unclear whether companies that win femvertising awards actually support women with an institutionalized approach to gender equality. A quantitative content analysis was performed assessing company leadership team listings, annual reports, CSR reports, and CSR websites of 61 US-based companies to compare the prevalence of internal and external gender-equality CSR activities of (...)
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  • Consumption Ethics: A Review and Analysis of Future Directions for Interdisciplinary Research. [REVIEW]Michal Carrington, Andreas Chatzidakis, Helen Goworek & Deirdre Shaw - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (2):215-238.
    The terminology employed to explore consumption ethics, the counterpart to business ethics, is increasingly varied not least because consumption has become a central discourse and area of investigation across disciplines. Rather than assuming interchangeability, we argue that these differences signify divergent understandings and contextual nuances and should, therefore, inform future writing and understanding in this area. Accordingly, this article advances consumer ethics scholarship through a systematic review of the current literature that identifies key areas of convergence and contradiction. We then (...)
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  • Pathways to Civic Engagement with Big Social Issues: An Integrated Approach.Dionysis Skarmeas, Constantinos N. Leonidou, Charalampos Saridakis & Giuseppe Musarra - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (2):261-285.
    Individual actions designed to address issues of public concern is a common theme in the discourse on how to mobilize resources and target efforts toward sustainable practices. We contribute to this area by developing and empirically validating a multidimensional scale for civic engagement; synthesizing and testing the adequacy of the theory of planned behavior and the value–belief–norm theory in explaining civic engagement; and considering how an individual’s orientation, identity, and beliefs motivate moral thinking and action. The focus is on the (...)
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  • Mobilising Common Biocultural Heritage for the Socioeconomic Inclusion of Small Farmers: Panarchy of Two Case Studies on Quinoa in Chile and Bolivia.Thierry Winkel, Lizbeth Núñez-Carrasco, Pablo José Cruz, Nancy Egan, Luís Sáez-Tonacca, Priscilla Cubillos-Celis, Camila Poblete-Olivera, Natalia Zavalla-Nanco, Bárbara Miño-Baes & Maria-Paz Viedma-Araya - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):433-447.
    Valorising the biocultural heritage of common goods could enable peasant farmers to achieve socially and economically inclusive sustainability. Increasingly appreciated by consumers, peasant heritage products offer small farmers promising opportunities for economic, social and territorial development. Identifying the obstacles and levers of this complex, multi-scale and multi-stakeholder objective requires an integrative framework. We applied the panarchy conceptual framework to two cases of participatory research with small quinoa producers: a local fair in Chile and quinoa export production in Bolivia. In both (...)
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  • Fairtrade Towns as Unconventional Networks of Ethical Activism.Ken Peattie & Anthony Samuel - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (1):265-282.
    The growing availability and consumption of Fairtrade products is recognised as one of the most widespread ethically inspired market developments, and as an example of activist-driven change within the wider marketing system. The Fairtrade Towns movement, now operating in over 1700 towns and cities globally, represents a comparatively recent extension of Fairtrade marketing driven by local activists seeking to promote positive change in production and consumption systems. This paper briefly explores the conventional framing of the role that ethically related activism (...)
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  • Towards Responsible and Sustainable Supply Chains – Innovation, Multi-Stakeholder Approach and Governance.Agata Gurzawska - 2020 - Philosophy of Management 19 (3):267-295.
    Supply chains are an indispensable element of any global economy. At the same time such supply chains create a societal and environmental burden. Drastic actions are required to mitigate these effects. Supply chains should become responsible and sustainable addressing economic, political, societal, legal, human rights, ethical and environmental concerns. This research shifts from the question of why companies should implement responsibility and sustainability into supply chains, to how they should do so effectively. Illustrated by a case study of Sedex, a (...)
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  • Three Types of Organizational Boundary Spanning: Predicting CSR Policy Extensiveness Among Global Consumer Products Companies.Alwyn Lim & Shawn Pope - 2020 - Business Ethics: A European Review 29 (3):451-470.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  • A Qualified Account of Supererogation: Toward a Better Conceptualization of Corporate Social Responsibility.Antonio Tencati, Nicola Misani & Sandro Castaldo - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (2):250-272.
    ABSTRACTSome firms are initiating pro-stakeholder activities and policies that transcend conventional corporate social responsibility conceptions and seem inconsistent with their business interests or economic responsibilities. These initiatives, which are neither legally nor morally obligatory, are responding to calls for a more active role of business in society and for a broader interpretation of CSR. In fact, they benefit stakeholders in a superior and an innovative way and are difficult to reconcile with commonly used rationales in the extant CSR literature, such (...)
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  • Giving the Gift of Goodness: An Exploration of Socially Responsible Gift-Giving.Todd Green, Julie Tinson & John Peloza - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):29-44.
    Previous research demonstrates that consumers support firms’ CSR activities, and increasingly demand socially responsible products and services. However, an implicit assumption in the extant literature is that the purchaser and the consumer of the product are the same person. The current research focuses on a unique form of socially responsible consumption behavior: gift-giving. Through 30 depth consumer interviews, we develop a typology of consumers based on whether consumers integrate CSR-related information into purchases, and whether the purchases are for themselves or (...)
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  • Corporate Codes of Conduct: The Effects of Code Content and Quality on Ethical Performance. [REVIEW]Patrick M. Erwin - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):535 - 548.
    Corporate codes of conduct are a practical corporate social responsibility (CSR) instrument commonly used to govern employee behavior and establish a socially responsible organizational culture. The effectiveness of these codes has been widely discussed on theoretical grounds and empirically tested in numerous previous reports that directly compare companies with and without codes of conduct. Empirical research has yielded inconsistent results that may be explained by multiple ancillary factors, including the quality of code content and implementation, which are excluded from analyses (...)
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  • Does Religion Affect the Materialism of Consumers? An Empirical Investigation of Buddhist Ethics and the Resistance of the Self.Stefano Pace - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):25-46.
    This paper investigates the effects of Buddhist ethics on consumers’ materialism, that is, the propensity to attach a fundamental role to possessions. The literature shows that religion and religiosity influence various attitudes and behaviors of consumers, including their ethical beliefs and ethical decisions. However, most studies focus on general religiosity rather than on the specific doctrinal ethical tenets of religions. The current research focuses on Buddhism and argues that it can tame materialism directly, similar to other religions, and through the (...)
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  • Business Unethicality as an Impediment to Consumer Trust: The Moderating Role of Demographic and Cultural Characteristics. [REVIEW]Leonidas C. Leonidou, Olga Kvasova, Constantinos N. Leonidou & Simos Chari - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):397-415.
    The article reports the findings of a study conducted among 387 consumers regarding their perceptions of the unethicality of business practices of firms and how these affect their response behavior, in terms of trust, satisfaction, and loyalty. The study confirmed that high levels of perceived corporate unethicality decrease consumer trust. This in turn reduces consumer satisfaction, which ultimately has negative effects on customer loyalty. It was also revealed that, although both consumer gender and urbanity have a moderating effect on the (...)
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  • Ethical Consumption and New Business Models in the Food Industry. Evidence From the Eataly Case.Roberta Sebastiani, Francesca Montagnini & Daniele Dalli - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):473-488.
    Individual and collective ethical stances regarding ethical consumption and related outcomes are usually seen as both a form of concern about extant market offerings and as opportunities to develop new offerings. In this sense, demand and supply are traditionally portrayed as interacting dialectically on the basis of extant business models. In general, this perspective implicitly assumes the juxtaposition of demand side ethical stances and supply side corporate initiatives. The Eataly story describes, however, a different approach to market transformation; in this (...)
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  • Focus on Fairtrade: Propositions for Integrating Fairtrade and Supply Chain Management Research. [REVIEW]Katri Karjalainen & Claire Moxham - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):267-282.
    Driven by increased consumer interest and stakeholder pressure, the number of Fairtrade (FT) products has been steadily increasing. The mainstreaming of FT means that the products are now facing stiff competition within the generic product categories in which they operate. While consumers may pressure organizations for ethical conduct, they are less willing to pay premium prices for fairly traded products. For FT to continue to grow, more efficient operating models are required to offset the premium prices paid to producers to (...)
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  • The Mediated Influence of a Traceability Label on Consumer’s Willingness to Buy the Labelled Product.Cosmina Bradu, Jacob L. Orquin & John Thøgersen - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2):283-295.
    This paper investigates the effectiveness of a new traceability label on consumer willingness to buy the labelled product and whether the effect is mediated by moral affective evaluations of the product. A between-subjects factorial design was used to test the effect of a new traceability label on willingness to buy a chocolate bar, while controlling for different product features and whether this effect was mediated through the consumer’s moral affective evaluations of the product. A broad sample of 1,064 ordinary Danish (...)
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  • The Role of Corporate Social Responsibility in Consumer Evaluation of Nutrition Information Disclosure by Retail Restaurants.Christine Ye, J. Joseph Cronin & John Peloza - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):313-326.
    Research examining consumer responses to the provision of nutritional information as part of restaurant menus has produced mixed results. In light of pending legislation requiring the provision of nutritional information, the authors examine the how corporate social responsibility impacts consumer service evaluation of restaurants. Findings from three studies demonstrate that the relationship between consumer attitudes toward the disclosure of nutrition information and their subsequent evaluation of the food provider is impacted by CSR-related initiatives. Studies one and two find that consumer (...)
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  • A Case for Consumer Social Responsibility : Including a Selected Review of Consumer Ethics/Social Responsibility Research.Scott J. Vitell - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (4):767-774.
    The literature is replete with articles emphasizing the importance of corporate social responsibility. However, few, if any, of these articles discuss the role of the consumer in achieving corporate social responsibility. It is the premise of the current paper that it may be difficult for corporate social responsibility to succeed without the assistance of consumers. That is, for corporate social responsibility to flourish, it needs to be accompanied by consumer social responsibility. This paper examines this proposition, makes the distinction between (...)
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  • Reconnecting Business and Society: Perceptions of Authenticity in Corporate Social Responsibility.Daina D. Mazutis & Natalie Slawinski - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (1):137-150.
    This article explores the relationship between corporate social responsibility and authenticity by developing a framework that explains the characteristics of CSR activities that lead to a perception by stakeholders that a firm’s CSR efforts are genuine. Drawing on the authenticity literature, we identify two core dimensions of authenticity that impact stakeholder perceptions of CSR: distinctiveness and social connectedness. Distinctiveness captures the extent to which a firm’s CSR activities are aligned with their core mission, vision and values while social connectedness refers (...)
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  • Understanding Purchase Intention During Product-Harm Crises: Moderating Effects of Perceived Corporate Ability and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW]Chieh-Peng Lin, Shwu-Chuan Chen, Chou-Kang Chiu & Wan-Yu Lee - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):455-471.
    A company’s product-harm crises often lead to negative publicity which substantially affects purchase intention. This study attempts to examine the purchase intention and its antecedents (e.g., perceived negative publicity) during product-harm crises by simultaneously including perceived corporate ability (CA) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) as moderators. In the study’s proposed model, purchase intention is indirectly affected by perceived CA, negative publicity, and CSR via the mediation of trust and affective identification. At the same time, the influences of perceived negative publicity (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and the Benefits of Employee Trust: A Cross-Disciplinary Perspective. [REVIEW]S. Duane Hansen, Benjamin B. Dunford, Alan D. Boss, R. Wayne Boss & Ingo Angermeier - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):29-45.
    Research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) has tended to focus on external stakeholders and outcomes, revealing little about internal effects that might also help explain CSR-firm performance linkages and the impact that corporate marketing strategies can have on internal stakeholders such as employees. The two studies ( N = 1,116 and N = 2,422) presented in this article draw on theory from both corporate marketing and organizational behavior (OB) disciplines to test the general proposition that employee trust partially mediates the (...)
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  • Social Sustainability in Selecting Emerging Economy Suppliers.Matthias Ehrgott, Felix Reimann, Lutz Kaufmann & Craig R. Carter - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):99-119.
    Despite the growing public awareness of social sustainability issues, little is known about what drives firms to emphasize social criteria in their supplier management practices and what the precise benefits of such efforts are. This is especially true for relationships with international suppliers from the world's emerging economies in Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe. Building on stakeholder theory, we address the issue by examining how pressures from customers, the government, and employees as primary constituencies of the firm determine the (...)
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  • How Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility Affects Employee Cynicism: The Mediating Role of Organizational Trust.Carolina Serrano Archimi, Emmanuelle Reynaud, Hina Mahboob Yasin & Zeeshan Ahmed Bhatti - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (4):907-921.
    This study examines to what extent perceived corporate social responsibility reduces employee cynicism, and whether trust plays a mediating role in the relationship between CSR and employee cynicism. Three distinct contributions beyond the existing literature are offered. First, the relationship between perceived CSR and employee cynicism is explored in greater detail than has previously been the case. Second, trust in the company leaders is positioned as a mediator of the relationship between CSR and employee cynicism. Third, we disaggregate the measure (...)
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  • Different Shades of Green Consciousness: The Interplay of Sustainability Labeling and Environmental Impact on Product Evaluations.Yoon-Na Cho - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (1):73-82.
    The sustainability labeling on the front of a package featured in a print advertisement may influence consumers’ product evaluations and purchase decisions. The findings of this exploratory study suggest that consumers seem to evaluate the sustainability claim more favorably if the advertisement highlights the personal impact on them. Moreover, environmental involvement appears to further moderate the effects of sustainability claims and environmental impact framing. The interactions that emerged in this study suggest that sustainability labeling effects constitute a complex phenomenon that (...)
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  • Product Differentiation Via Corporate Social Responsibility: Consumer Priorities and the Mediating Role of Food Labels.Marco Costanigro, Oana Deselnicu & Dawn Thilmany McFadden - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (3):597-609.
    This article examines quantitatively the determinants of purchase decisions based on corporate social responsibility, adopting a hierarchical conceptual model of decision making where the key factors are personal concern, information availability and financial considerations. We use best–worst methods to assess consumer priorities for CSR activities in milk production; and elicit consumer interpretation of four labels in terms of CSR and other outcomes. We then elicit willingness to pay for the labels, and estimate regression models to determine how predictive each label (...)
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  • Are Fair Trade Goods Credence Goods? A New Proposal, with French Illustrations.Gaëlle Balineau & Ivan Dufeu - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):331 - 345.
    In the literature, Fair Trade (FT) goods are usually associated with other products differentiated by process attributes such as organic food, genetically modified (GM) food or child labour-free clothing. All of these products are regarded as credence goods. This classification refers to the simplified definition of credence goods, which describes product attributes which consumers cannot evaluate, even after having consumed the good. Focusing on the characteristics of FT goods, this article proposes a reassessment of the link between FT goods and (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility as Cultural Meaning Management: A Critique of the Marketing of ‘Ethical’ Bottled Water.Vinicius Brei & Steffen Böhm - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (3):233-252.
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  • Fair Trade, Ethical Decision Making and the Narrative of Gender Difference.Kevin Morrell & Chanaka Jayawardhena - 2010 - Business Ethics: A European Review 19 (4):393-407.
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