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  1. The Role of Bodily Perception in Emotion: In Defense of an Impure Somatic Theory.Luca Barlassina & Albert Newen - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (3):637-678.
    In this paper, we develop an impure somatic theory of emotion, according to which emotions are constituted by the integration of bodily perceptions with representations of external objects, events, or states of affairs. We put forward our theory by contrasting it with Prinz's pure somatic theory, according to which emotions are entirely constituted by bodily perceptions. After illustrating Prinz's theory and discussing the evidence in its favor, we show that it is beset by serious problems—i.e., it gets the neural correlates (...)
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  • Integrating Basic and Higher-Cognitive Emotions Within a Common Evolutionary Framework: Lessons From the Transformation of Primate Dominance Into Human Pride.Jason Clark - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):437-460.
    Many argue that higher-cognitive emotions such as pride arose de novo in humans, and thus fall outside of the scope of the kinds of evolutionary explanations offered for ?basic emotions,? like fear. This approach fractures the general category of ?emotion? into two deeply distinct kinds of emotion. However, an increasing number of emotion researchers are converging on the conclusion that higher-cognitive emotions are evolutionarily rooted in simpler emotional responses found in primates. I argue that pride fits this pattern, and then (...)
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  • The Future of Musical Emotions.Dylan van der Schyff & Andrea Schiavio - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • The Cognitive/Noncognitive Debate in Emotion Theory: A Corrective From Spinoza.Renee England - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (2):102-112.
    An intractable problem that characterizes the contemporary philosophical discussion of emotion is whether emotions are fundamentally cognitive or noncognitive. In this article, I will establish tha...
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  • Further Thoughts on the Evolution of Pride’s Two Facets: A Response to Clark.Azim F. Shariff, Jessica L. Tracy, Joey T. Cheng & Joseph Henrich - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (4):399-400.
    In Clark’s thoughtful analysis of the evolution of the two facets of pride, he suggests that the concurrent existence of hubristic and authentic pride in humans represents a “persistence problem,” wherein the vestigial trait (hubristic pride) continues to exist alongside the derived trait (authentic pride). In our view, evidence for the two facets does not pose a persistence problem; rather, hubristic and authentic pride both likely evolved as higher-order cognitive emotions that solve uniquely human—but distinct— evolutionary problems. Instead of being (...)
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  • Normativity, Realism and Emotional Experience.Michael-John Turp - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-18.
    Norms are standards against which actions, dispositions of mind and character, states of affairs and so forth can be measured. They also govern our behaviour, make claims on us, bind us and provide reasons for action and thought that motivate us. J. L. Mackie argued that the intrinsic prescriptivity, or to-be-pursuedness, of moral norms would make them utterly unlike anything else that we know of. Therefore, we should favour an error theory of morality. Mackie thought that the to-be-pursuedness would have (...)
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  • Current Emotion Research in Philosophy.Paul E. Griffiths - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):215-222.
    There remains a division between the work of philosophers who draw on the sciences of the mind to understand emotion and those who see the philosophy of emotion as more self-sufficient. This article examines this methodological division before reviewing some of the debates that have figured in the philosophical literature of the last decade: whether emotion is a single kind of thing, whether there are discrete categories of emotion, and whether emotion is a form of perception. These questions have been (...)
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  • Hubristic and Authentic Pride as Serial Homologues: The Same but Different.Jason A. Clark - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (4):397-398.
    Tracy, Shariff, and Cheng (2010) propose that human pride has two facets (hubristic pride [HP] and authentic pride [AP]) which, despite their similarities, diverge in important ways, including their evolutionary histories and functions. Put simplistically, AP emerged from HP. While AP and HP are thus homologous, HP continues to exist in humans, alongside AP. This is problematic on the most common interpretation of homology, in which an ancestral trait transforms into a derived trait, but does not remain present independently. I (...)
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  • Why Darwinians Should Not Be Afraid of Mary Douglas—And Vice Versa The Case of Disgust.Andreas De Block & Stefaan E. Cuypers - 2012 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (4):459-488.
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  • When Disgust Leads to Dysphoria: A Three-Wave Longitudinal Study Assessing the Temporal Relationship Between Self-Disgust and Depressive Symptoms.Philip A. Powell, Jane Simpson & Paul G. Overton - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (5):900-913.
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