Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. “I Don’T Need My Patients’ Opinion to Withdraw Treatment”: Patient Preferences at the End-of-Life and Physician Attitudes Towards Advance Directives in England and France.Ruth Horn - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (3):425-435.
    This paper presents the results of a qualitative interview study exploring English and French physicians’ moral perspectives and attitudes towards end-of-life decisions when patients lack capacity to make decisions for themselves. The paper aims to examine the importance physicians from different contexts accord to patient preferences and to explore the role of advance directives in each context. The interviews focus on problems that emerge when deciding to withdraw/-hold life-sustaining treatment from both conscious and unconscious patients; decision-making procedures and the participation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Euthanasia and End-of-Life Practices in France and Germany. A Comparative Study.Ruth Horn - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):197-209.
    The objective of this paper is to understand from a sociological perspective how the moral question of euthanasia, framed as the “right to die”, emerges and is dealt with in society. It takes France and Germany as case studies, two countries in which euthanasia is prohibited and which have similar legislation on the issue. I presuppose that, and explore how, each society has its own specificities in terms of practical, social and political norms that affect the ways in which they (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Advance Directives in English and French Law: Different Concepts, Different Values, Different Societies. [REVIEW]Ruth Judith Horn - 2012 - Health Care Analysis (1):1-14.
    In Western societies advance directives are widely recognised as important means to extend patient self-determination under circumstances of incapacity. Following other countries, England and France have adopted legislation aiming to clarify the legal status of advance directives. In this paper, I will explore similarities and differences in both sets of legislation, the arguments employed in the respective debates and the socio-political structures on which these differences are based. The comparison highlights how different legislations express different concepts emphasising different values accorded (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Solidarity and Autonomy: Two Conflicting Values in English and French Health Care and Bioethics Debates?Marie Gaille & Ruth Horn - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (6):441-446.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Clinical Ethics Consultation in the Transition Countries of Central and Eastern Europe.Marcin Orzechowski, Maximilian Schochow & Florian Steger - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (2):833-850.
    Since 1989, clinical ethics consultation in form of hospital ethics committees was established in most of the transition countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Up to now, the similarities and differences between HECs in Central and Eastern Europe and their counterparts in the U.S. and Western Europe have not been determined. Through search in literature databases, we have identified studies that document the implementation of clinical ethics consultation in Central and Eastern Europe. These studies have been analyzed under the following (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • When Listening to the People: Lessons From Complementary and Alternative Medicine (Cam) for Bioethics. [REVIEW]Monika Clark-Grill - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (1):71-81.
    Complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) have become increasingly popular over recent decades. Within bioethics CAM has so far mostly stimulated discussions around their level of scientific evidence, or along the standard concerns of bioethics. To gain an understanding as to why CAM is so successful and what the CAM success means for health care ethics, this paper explores empirical research studies on users of CAM and the reasons for their choice. It emerges that there is a close connection to fundamental (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Concept of Dignity and Its Use in End-of-Life Debates in England and France.Ruth Horn & Angeliki Kerasidou - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (3):404-413.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations