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  1. Scienticity and Artistry Across All Subjects.Anthony Lock - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (2):355-377.
    Both scienticity and artistry have been listed in cluster concept definitions for both science and art. However, these clusters have not been considered together before. I contrast and combine these different clusters for the first time, and I argue that doing so better elucidates the properties of the natural sciences, humanities and fine arts than the science and art cluster concepts do separately. This is because all disciplines have varying levels of scienticity and artistry, but this is not captured fully (...)
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  • Stimmung: From Mood to Atmosphere.Angelika Krebs - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (4):1419-1436.
    Unlike human beings, landscapes, cities and buildings cannot feel anything in the literal sense. They do not have nervous systems. Nevertheless, we attribute “Stimmungen” such as peacefulness and melancholy to them. On what basis? With what right? And why does it matter anyway? This paper attempts an answer to this bunch of questions. The first section clarifies the concept of “Stimmung,” by distinguishing its three major meanings, namely harmony, mood and atmosphere. Section two discusses various models of how “Stimmung” is (...)
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  • Constructing Aesthetic Value: Responses to My Commentators.Mohan Matthen - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):100-111.
    This is a response to invited and submitted commentary on "The Pleasure of Art," published in Australasian Philosophical Reviews 1, 1 (2017). In it, I expand on my view of aesthetic pleasure, particularly how the distinction between facilitating pleasure and relief pleasure works. In response to critics who discerned and were uncomfortable with the aesthetic hedonism that they found in the work, I develop that aspect of my view. My position is that the aesthetic value of a work of art (...)
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  • Comments on Mohan Matthen's ‘The Pleasure of Art’.Cynthia A. Freeland - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):29-39.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines Mohan Matthen's account of aesthetic pleasure. The first part explores implications of Matthen's notion of ‘fit’ between features of art objects and our pleasurable contemplation of them. Through historical comparisons with Plato and Dewey, I challenge his claim not to be offering a theory of aesthetic norms. The second part of my paper sketches how Matthen might address two important problems of contemporary aesthetics: the first concerning interpretation, and the second concerning genres of art that evoke negative (...)
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  • Toward a General Psychological Model of Tension and Suspense.Moritz Lehne & Stefan Koelsch - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Darwinism and its Discontents. By Michael Ruse. [REVIEW]Christopher Eliot - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (5):702-710.
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  • Plio-Pleistocene Foundations of Hominin Musicality: Coevolution of Cognition, Sociality, and Music.Anton Killin - 2017 - Biological Theory 12 (4):222-235.
    Today, music is ubiquitous, highly valued in all known cultures, playing many roles in human daily life. The ethnographic study of the music of extant human foragers makes this quite apparent. Moreover, music is ancient. Sophisticated bird-bone and ivory flutes dated from 40 kya reveal an even earlier musical-technological tradition. So is music likely to be an entrenched feature of human social life during the long passage to behavioral modernity—say, by 150 kya—or earlier? In this article I sketch an evolutionary (...)
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  • Another Darwinian Aesthetics.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):237-252.
    I offer a Darwinian perspective on the existence of aesthetic interests, tastes, preferences, and productions. It is distinguished from the approaches of Denis Dutton and Geoffrey Miller, drawing instead on Richard O. Prum's notion of biotic artworlds. The relevance of neuroaesthetics to the philosophy of art is defended.
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  • Can Levinson's Intentional‐Historical Definition of Art Accommodate Revolutionary Art?Daniel Wilson - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):407-416.
    In this article, I examine whether Jerrold Levinson's intentional-historical definition of art can successfully accommodate revolutionary art. For Levinson, an item is art if it was intended to be regarded as some prior art was regarded. But revolutionary art involves a regard that is “completely distinct” from preexisting art regards. I consider and reject Levinson's proposed solutions to the problem of accommodating revolutionary art. I then defend an alternative account of transgressive art regard. Unfortunately for the intentional-historical definition, the acceptance (...)
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  • Engineered Niches and Naturalized Aesthetics.Richard A. Richards - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (4):465-477.
    Recent scientific approaches to aesthetics include evolutionary theories about the origin of art behavior, psychological investigations into human aesthetic experience and preferences, and neurophysiological explorations of the mechanisms underlying art experience. Critics of these approaches argue that they are ultimately irrelevant to a philosophical aesthetics because they cannot help us understand the distinctive conceptual basis and normativity of our art experience. This criticism may seem plausible given the piecemeal nature of these scientific approaches, but a more comprehensive naturalistic framework can (...)
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  • Art and Science: A Philosophical Sketch of Their Historical Complexity and Codependence.Nicolas J. Bullot, William P. Seeley & Stephen Davies - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (4):453-463.
    To analyze the relations between art and science, philosophers and historians have developed different lines of inquiry. A first type of inquiry considers how artistic and scientific practices have interacted over human history. Another project aims to determine the contributions that scientific research can make to our understanding of art, including the contributions that cognitive science can make to philosophical questions about the nature of art. We rely on contributions made to these projects in order to demonstrate that art and (...)
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  • Defining Art and Artworlds.Stephen Davies - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):375-384.
    Most art is made by people with a well-developed concept of art and who are familiar with its forms and genres as well as with the informal institutions of its presentation and reception. This is reflected in philosophers’ proposed definitions. The earliest artworks were made by people who lacked the concept and in a context that does not resemble the art traditions of established societies, however. An adequate definition must accommodate their efforts. The result is a complex, hybrid definition: something (...)
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  • Kant on Informed Pure Judgments of Taste.Emine Hande Tuna - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (2):163-174.
    Two dominant interpretations of Kant's notion of adherent beauty, the conjunctive view and the incorporation view, provide an account of how to form informed aesthetic assessments concerning artworks. According to both accounts, judgments of perfection play a crucial role in making informed, although impure, judgments of taste. These accounts only examine aesthetic responses to objects that meet or fail to meet the expectations we have regarding what they ought to be. I demonstrate that Kant's works of genius do not fall (...)
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  • The Japanese Tea Ceremony and Pancultural Definitions of Art.Daniel Wilson - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (1):33-44.
    Dominic McIver Lopes and Yuriko Saito claim that the Japanese tea ceremony, or chadō, is a non-Western art form. Stephen Davies also defends that claim. In this article, I utilize the tea ceremony as a test case for pancultural definitions of art that claim to be inclusive of non-Western cultures without relying on Western ethnocentrism to justify their status as artworks. I argue that Davies's hybrid definition is not justified in assuming a homogenous art tradition and/or a unified conception of (...)
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  • Body, Brain, and Beauty: The Place of Aesthetics in the World of Mind.Zdravko Radman - 2012 - Diogenes 59 (1-2):1921.
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  • Aesthetics and Bildung.Pauline von Bonsdorff - 2012 - Diogenes 59 (1-2):127-137.
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  • Attentional Bias to Beauty with Evolutionary Benefits: Evidence From Aesthetic Appraisal of Landscape Architecture.Wei Zhang, Xiaoxiang Tang, Xianyou He & Shuxian Lai - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Landscape and Health: Connecting Psychology, Aesthetics, and Philosophy Through the Concept of Affordance.Laura Menatti & Antonio Casado da Rocha - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • The Triadic Roots of Human Cognition: “Mind” Is the Ability to Go Beyond Dyadic Associations.Norman D. Cook - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Art and Fiction Are Signals with Indeterminate Truth Values.Nathaniel Rabb - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  • The Artful Mind Meets Art History: Toward a Psycho-Historical Framework for the Science of Art Appreciation.Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):123-137.
    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the (...)
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  • An Honest Display of Fakery: Replicas and the Role of Museums.Constantine Sandis - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:241-259.
    This essay brings together questions from aesthetic theory and museum management. In particular, I relate a contextualist account of the value of copies to a pluralistic understanding of the purpose of museums. I begin by offering a new defence of the no longer fashionable view that the aesthetic value of artworks may be detached from questions regarding their provenance. My argument is partly based on a distinction between the process of creating a work of art and the artwork in question.Next, (...)
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  • Neuroartes: artes para la salud.Luc Delannoy - 2015 - Revista Del Hospital de Vina Del Mar 2015 (71 (3)):111-117.
    We introduce Neuroartes as a biological humanism that concentrates on the development of social interventions. We review several connections between art and the human body, mainly the brain. We suggest art, painting in the present case, as a tool to work with the elderly with cognitive and/or motor impairment for the purpose of helping them with their subjectivity and autonomy.
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  • Nature's Longing for Beauty: Elegance as an Evolutionary Attractor, with Implications for Human Systems.Charles Smith - 2010 - World Futures 66 (7):504-510.
    (2010). Nature's Longing for Beauty: Elegance as an Evolutionary Attractor, with Implications for Human Systems. World Futures: Vol. 66, No. 7, pp. 504-510.
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  • Approaches to Research in Art Therapy Using Imaging Technologies.Juliet L. King & Girija Kaimal - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
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  • Are Artworks More Like People Than Artifacts? Individual Concepts and Their Extensions.George E. Newman, Daniel M. Bartels & Rosanna K. Smith - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):647-662.
    This paper examines people's reasoning about identity continuity and its relation to previous research on how people value one-of-a-kind artifacts, such as artwork. We propose that judgments about the continuity of artworks are related to judgments about the continuity of individual persons because art objects are seen as physical extensions of their creators. We report a reanalysis of previous data and the results of two new empirical studies that test this hypothesis. The first study demonstrates that the mere categorization of (...)
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  • Denis Dutton . The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure and Human Evolution. Bloomsbury, New York, NY. $25.Ryan Nichols - 2010 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 10 (3-4):404-407.
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  • Do Animals Make Art or the Evolutionary Continuity of Species: A Case for Uniqueness.Jerzy Luty - 2017 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 8 (1):107-116.
    When Władysław Tatarkiewicz wrote that there are only two things that can be said about art: that it is a human activity, not a product of nature, and that it is a conscious activity, adding that every statement about art different from the ones mentioned above was always finally overthrown, he probably did not think that the first claim could be questioned by anyone. In the following paper, I will trace the history of observations of “artistic behaviors” that were made (...)
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  • The Neuroaesthetics of Prose Fiction: Pitfalls, Parameters and Prospects.Michael Burke - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  • Attempting Art: An Essay on Intention-Dependence.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2017 - Dissertation, McGill University
    Attempting art: an essay on intention-dependenceIt is a truism among philosophers that art is intention-dependent—that is to say, art-making is an activity that depends in some way on the maker's intentions. Not much thought has been given to just what this entails, however. For instance, most philosophers of art assume that intention-dependence entails concept-dependence—i.e. possessing a concept of art is necessary for art-making, so that what prospective artists must intend is to make art. And yet, a mounting body of anthropological (...)
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  • Roots and Route of the Artification Hypothesis.Ellen Dissanayake - 2017 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 8 (1):15-32.
    Over four decades, my ideas about the arts in human evolution have themselves evolved, from an original notion of art as a human behaviour of “making special” to a full-fledged hypothesis of artification. A summary of the gradual developmental path of the hypothesis, based on ethological principles and concepts, is given, and an argument presented in which artification is described as an exaptation whose roots lie in adaptive features of ancestral mother–infant interaction that contributed to infant survival and maternal reproductive (...)
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  • The Re-Enchantment of the World: McDowell, Scruton and Heidegger.George Reynolds - unknown
    In a recent discussion of disenchantment and re-enchantment Charles Taylor suggests that it is possible to respond to the disenchanted view of the world, in which meaning and value are understood as subjective projections, by articulating a re-enchanted sense of nature or the universe from the perspective of human ‘agency-in-the-world’, in which meaning and value are objective. The question I address in this thesis is, what could it mean to articulate a re-enchantment from within our ‘agency-in-the-world’? In Chapter One I (...)
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  • Cognitive Processes Underlying the Artistic Experience.Alejandra Wah - 2017 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 8 (1):45-58.
    Based on the field of aesthetics, for centuries philosophers and more recently scientists have been concerned with understanding the artistic experience focusing on emotional responses to the perception of artworks. By contrast, in the last decades, evolutionary biology has been concerned with explaining the artistic experience by focusing on the cognitive processes underlying this experience. Up until now, the cognitive mechanisms that allow humans to experience objects and events as art remain largely unexplored and there is still no conventional use (...)
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  • Affective Feelings and Aesthetics.Edmund T. Rolls - 2011 - In Elisabeth Schellekens & Peter Goldie (eds.), The Aesthetic Mind: Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. pp. 116.
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  • Titles Change the Esthetic Appreciations of Paintings.Gernot Gerger & Helmut Leder - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
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  • Reviews & Comments.A. Cura di Mariagrazia Portera - 2015 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (1):181-203.
    Books Christy Mag Uidhir, Art andObjects [Elisa Caldarola, p. 182] • Julie Jaffee Nagel, Melodies of the Mind. Connections Between Psychoanalisis and Music [Michele Gardini, p. 185] • Dominic McIver Lopes, Beyond Art [Filippo Focosi, p. 187] • Annemarie Gethmann-Siefert, Herta Nagl-Docekal, Erzsébet Ròsza, Elisabeth Weisser-Lohmann, Hegels Ästhetik als Theorie der Moderne [Lorenzo Leonardo Pizzichemi, p. 190] Comments Toward an Integrated Science of Aesthetics. Getting Rid of the Main Misunderstandings in Evolutionary Aesthetics [Mariagrazia Portera, p. 194].
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  • Shared Aesthetic Starting Points?Roberta Dreon - 2015 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (1):53-69.
    Are there any theoretical resources – conceptual, lexical or argumentative ones – in the interdisciplinary debate on the evolutionary origins of the arts that can help us go beyond the traditional autonomistic conception of art, in favour of a more continuist and inclusive interpretation of human artistic practices? The paper examines the different voices in the debate, against the background of a cultural naturalist attitude inspired by John Dewey, by focusing on those contributions which can be interpreted in non-reductionist, anti-foundationalist (...)
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  • Common Minds, Uncommon Thoughts: A Philosophical Anthropological Investigation of Uniquely Human Creative Behavior, with an Emphasis on Artistic Ability, Religious Reflection, and Scientific Study.Johan De Smedt - unknown
    The aim of this dissertation is to create a naturalistic philosophical picture of creative capacities that are specific to our species, focusing on artistic ability, religious reflection, and scientific study. By integrating data from diverse domains within a philosophical anthropological framework, I have presented a cognitive and evolutionary approach to the question of why humans, but not other animals engage in such activities. Through an application of cognitive and evolutionary perspectives to the study of these behaviors, I have sought to (...)
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  • Philosophical Aesthetics: A Naturalist Perspective.Laura Di Summa-Knoop - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 1 (2):191-207.
    ABSTRACTCan a Naturalist Definition of art replace the historical and institutional positions argued for by philosophical aesthetics? This article considers Denis Dutton’s work in evolutionary psychology and his cluster Naturalist Definition of art. I begin with an analysis of the validity of what Dutton takes to be the most important criterion: Imaginative Experience. I propose a criticism of Dutton’s set of criteria coupled with a re-evaluation of what may be implied when referring to a naturalist basis for the arts. Specifically, (...)
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  • On a Pedestal—Sport as an Arena for Admiration.Tara A. Smith - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (1):4-25.
    ABSTRACTIn philosophical analyses of the value of sport, a relatively unheralded feature is the opportunity that sport offers for admiration. While we readily salute many of the things that people...
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  • The Duality of Art: Body and Soul.George E. Newman - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):153 - 153.
    Bullot & Reber (B&R) make a strong case for the role of causal reasoning in the appreciation of artwork. Although I agree that an artistic design stance is important for art appreciation, I suggest that it is a subset of a more general framework for evaluating artworks as the causal extensions of individuals, which includes inferences about the creator's mind, as well as more physical notions of essence.
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  • The Conceptual Critique of Innateness.Stefan Linquist - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (5):e12492.
    It is widely recognized that the innate versus acquired distinction is a false dichotomy. Yet many scientists continue to describe certain traits as “innate” and take this to imply that those traits are not acquired, or “unlearned.” This article asks what cognitive role, if any, the concept of innateness should play in the psychological and behavioural sciences. I consider three arguments for eliminating innateness from scientific discourse. First, the classification of a trait as innate is thought to discourage empirical research (...)
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  • Body, Brain, and Beauty: The Place of Aesthetics in the World of the Mind.Zdravko Radman - 2012 - Diogenes 59 (1-2):41-51.
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  • Against Nature? Or, Confessions of a Darwinian Modernist.Murray Smith - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:151-182.
    A few years ago I gave a paper on the aesthetics of ‘noise,’ that is, on the ways in which non-musical sounds can be given aesthetic shape and structure, and thereby form the basis of significant aesthetic experience. Along the way I made reference to Arnold Schoenberg's musical theory, in particular his notion of Klangfarbenmelodie, literally ‘sound colour melody,’ or musical form based on timbre or tonal colour rather than on melody, harmony or rhythm. Schoenberg articulated his ideas about Klangfarbenmelodie (...)
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  • Educating the Design Stance: Issues of Coherence and Transgression.Norman H. Freeman & Melissa L. Allen - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):141 - 142.
    Bullot & Reber (B&R) put forth a design stance to fuse psychological and art historical accounts of visual thinking into a single theory. We argue that this aspect of their proposal needs further fine-tuning. Issues of transgression and coherence are necessary to provide stability to the design stance. We advocate looking to Art Education for such fundamentals of picture understanding.
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