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  1. A Grasshopperian Analysis Of The Strategic Foul.Deborah P. Vossen - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (3):325-346.
    The question of acceptability in respect to the strategic foul in sport has provoked a rich and seemingly irreconcilable dispute with normative theorists currently divided amongst three schools of thought including formalism, conventionalism and interpretivism. In this paper, I seek to transcend the three-way intellectual stalemate portrayed in the literature via a consideration as to whether or not the strategic foul qualifies as ‘Utopian’. More specifically, after demonstrating that Bernard Suits’ theory of game-playing is fully capable of embracing all three (...)
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  • Convencionalismo ético en deporte D’Agostino y Morgan en torno a las reglas y convenciones en deporte.Raúl Francisco Sebastián Solanes & Víctor Páramo Valero - 2015 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 32 (32):111-132.
    En el presente artículo nos proponemos realizar una comparación de la posición de D’Agostino con la de otro de los representantes del convencionalismo: William Morgan. A D’Agostino nos referiremos en el primer apartado y a Morgan en el segundo. Nos preguntaremos si Morgan, además de inscribir sus tesis dentro del convencionalismo, participa al mismo tiempo de la concepción internalista del deporte. Aunque uno y otro autor son convencionalistas, existen matices muy distintos entre sus posiciones que caben ser resaltadas, a fin (...)
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  • Sport and the Anxious Mind.Jeffrey Fry - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):177-190.
    ABSTRACTSport is the locus of varieties of athletic experience. In this paper, I focus on anxiety as a felt experience in sport. Anxiety is often experienced as a form of psychological distress. It...
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  • La inversión del platonismo a la base del internalismo en filosofía del deporte. Paso previo hacia una hermenéutica del deporte.Francisco Javier López Frías & Xavier Gimeno Monfort - 2017 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 71:171-186.
    En este artículo, defendemos que se ha producido una inversión del platonismo a la base de la filosofía del deporte, similar a la acaecida en el ámbito de la filosofía occidental. Para ello, exponemos a qué nos referimos con el platonismo en la filosofía del deporte. Más adelante, explicamos qué significa invertir el platonismo a raíz tanto de Nietzsche como de Heidegger. Tras ello, identificamos cuáles son los autores que han provocado tal cambio en la filosofía del deporte, a saber: (...)
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  • Rules in Games and Sports: Why a Solution to the Problem of Penalties Leads to the Rejection of Formalism as a Useful Theory About the Nature of Sport.Sinclair A. MacRae - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-14.
    ABSTRACTBernard Suits and other formalists endorse both the logical incompatibility thesis and the view that rule-breakings resulting in penalties can be a legitimate part of a game. This is what Fred D’Agostino calls ‘the problem of penalties’. In this paper, I reject both Suits’ and D’Agostino’s responses to the problem and argue instead that the solution is to abandon Suits’ view that the constitutive rules of all games are alike. Whereas the logical incompatibility thesis applies to games in which players’ (...)
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  • Match-Fixing: Working Towards an Ethical Framework.Andy Harvey - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (3):393-407.
    How does match-fixing, or other unfair manipulation of matches, that involves under-performance by players, or refereeing and umpiring that prevents fair competition, be thought of in ethical terms? In this article, I outline the different forms that match-fixing can take and seek to comprehend these disparate scenarios within Kantian, Hegelian and contractualist ethical frameworks. I tentatively suggest that, by developing an ethical opposition to match-fixing in sport, we can give much greater substance to popular phrases such as ‘respect for the (...)
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  • La estructura de la comunidad deportiva: una propuesta comunicativa.Francisco Javier López Frías - 2015 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 40 (1):139-156.
    The main goal of this paper is to argue that Anglo-American philosophy and Continental philosophy should work together within the arena of the philosophy of sport. To do so, the concept “communicative community”, which is found in Habermas’ and Apel’s discursive ethics, will be analyzed and applied to sports. As several authors, such as Raúl Sebastian Solanes, Robert L. Simon and William J. Morgan, have done this task before, I will critically analyze their proposals. In so doing, I will show (...)
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  • ‘Physicality’: One Among the Internal Goods of Sport.Robert G. Osterhoudt - 1996 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 23 (1):91-103.
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  • Reseñas de Libros.Joshua R. Bott, Paulina Morales Aguilera & Victor Paramo Valero - 2016 - Recerca.Revista de Pensament I Anàlisi 18:135-149.
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  • Perspectivas actuales de la filosofía y la pedagogía del deporte.Oscar Chiva Bartoll & Francisco Javier López-Frías - 2016 - Recerca.Revista de Pensament I Anàlisi 18:7-12.
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  • Merleau-Ponty Meets Kretchmar: Sweet Tensions of Embodied Learning.Øyvind F. Standal & Vegard F. Moe - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (3):256 - 269.
    The last decades have seen a rising philosophical interest in the phenomenology of skill acquisition. One central topic in this work is the relation between the athlete's background capacities and foreground attention as an invariant feature of skilful movements. The purpose of this paper is to examine further this gestalt relation from the perspective of Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological account of embodied learning and a classical notion from philosophy of sport, namely ?sweet tension of uncertainty of outcome?. In the first part we (...)
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  • The Ethics of Performance-Enhancing Technology in Sport.Sigmund Loland - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):152-161.
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  • Good Grasshopping and the Avoidance of Game-Spoiling.Deborah P. Vossen - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):175-192.
    Traditionally, acts of sportsmanship have been upheld as worthy of praise. The purpose of this paper is to discern whether Bernard Suits’ Grasshopper -- in "The Grasshopper: Games, Life and Utopia" -- would share this approval. The paper begins with a conceptual analysis of good sportspersonship. From this, four action categories are identified including good sportspersonship in the forms of game desertion, changing the game, not trying, and lusory self-handicapping. A strategy for evaluation is derived from the Grasshopper’s theory. Game-playing (...)
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  • Competition, Cooperation, and an Adversarial Model of Sport.Sinclair A. MacRae - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (1):53-67.
    In this paper, I defend a general theory of competition and contrast it with a corresponding general theory of cooperation. I then use this analysis to critique mutualism. Building on the work of Arthur Applbaum and Joseph Heath I develop an alternative adversarial model of competitive sport, one that helps explain and is partly justified by shallow interpretivism, and argue that this model helps shows that the claim that mutualism provides us with the most defensible ethical ideal of sport is (...)
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  • A Critique of Mutualism’s Combination of the Aristotelian and Kantian Traditions.Francisco Javier Lopez Frías - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (2):161-176.
    ABSTRACTIn this article, I will identify two key normative principles at the core of Robert L. Simon’s mutualist theory of sport, namely, the respect-for-the-opponent principle and the idea that sport is a practice aimed at pursuing excellence. The former is a Kantian principle grounded in human beings’ rationality, and the latter is an Aristotelian principle related to the development of excellences as a means to human flourishing. After having presented and analyzed both principles, I will critically evaluate Simon’s attempt to (...)
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  • Strategic Fouls: A New Defense.Erin Flynn - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):342-358.
    Among philosophers, the question about strategic fouls has been whether they are ethically justified in light of our best conception of sport. This paper proposes a different defense. I argue that many strategic fouls should be excused even if we regard them as unjustified. I first lay out a partial defense of the assumptions that playing to win cannot be subordinate to playing skillfully and that winning has value that cannot be accounted for in terms of the skill that produces (...)
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  • Toward Sport Reform: Hegemonic Masculinity and Reconceptualizing Competition.Colleen English - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):183-198.
    Hegemonic masculinity, a framework where stereotypically masculine traits are over-emphasized, plays a central role in sport, partly due to an excessive focus on winning. This type of masculinity marginalizes those that do not possess specific traits, including many women and men. I argue sport reform focused on mitigating hypercompetitive attitudes can reduce this harmful and marginalizing hegemonic masculinity in sport. I make this argument first by challenging the dichotomous nature of sport, especially in recognizing that all outcomes are a blend (...)
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  • Kinds of Fair Play and Regulation Enforcement: Toward a Better Sports Ethic.Ioan-Radu Motoarca - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (1):121-136.
    It is customary for institutions that organize sporting competitions and events to exercise a considerable degree of authority over the participants. That authority is often manifested in the enforcement of penalties for infringements of fair play. This paper focuses on one concrete case from soccer, although I take the discussion to extend to other sports as well. I argue that not all fair play rules should be enforced by the respective organizing institutions, and that enforcing all of them indiscriminately is (...)
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  • A Response to Gaffney: Teammates and the Games They Play.Scott Kretchmar - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (1):35-41.
    In this essay I endorse Gaffney’s paradoxical analysis that supports the right over the good, ‘horizontal commitments’ to teammates over ‘vertical loyalties’ to the cause of winning. However, I attempt to present two friendly amendments—by adding a second factor to the vertical element and by showing that a virtue ethics approach is needed in certain situations. I conclude that Gaffney’s deontological stance serves him well in the Hope Solo case, but might not be as effective in other circumstances.
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  • What’s Wrong With J.S. Mill’s “Harm-to-Others”-Principle?Claudio Tamburrini - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (1):1-26.
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  • Normative Theories of Sport: A Critical Review.Sigmund Loland - 2004 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 31 (2):111-121.
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  • Intentional Rules Violations—One More Time.Warren P. Fraleigh - 2003 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (2):166-176.
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  • The Conceptual Boundaries of Sport for the Disabled: Classification and Athletic Performance.Carwyn Jones & P. David Howe - 2005 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (2):133-146.
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  • Sport, Moral Interpretivism, and Football's Voluntary Suspension of Play Norm.Alun R. Hardman - 2009 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 3 (1):49-65.
    In recent years it has become increasingly the norm in football1 to kick the ball out of play when a player is, or appears to be, inadvertently injured. Kicking the ball out of play in football represents a particular instantiation of a generally understood fair play norm, the voluntary suspension of play (VSP). In the philosophical literature, support for the VSP norm is provided by John Russell (2007) who claims that his interpretivist account of sport is helpful for evaluating complex (...)
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  • Sport and Moral Education.Peter J. Arnold - 1994 - Journal of Moral Education 23 (1):75-89.
    Abstract It is suggested that there are three broadly held views about sport in relation to the moral life??the positive view, the neutral view and the negative view. Following a brief examination of morality and moral education the first of these views is upheld by arguing that sport as fairness is inherently concerned with the moral. It is further argued that sport is a valued human practice concerned with the virtues and that as a part of the curriculum is an (...)
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  • The Sports Contest and Value Priorities.Warren P. Fraleigh - 1986 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 13 (1):65-77.
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  • Fields of Dreams and Men of Straw: Philosophical Reflections on Performance-Enhancers In Sport.Klaus V. Meier - 1991 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 18 (1):74-85.
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  • Racers, Pacers, Gender and Records: On the Meaning of Sport Competition and Competitors.Danny Rosenberg & Pam Sailors - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (2):172-190.
    This paper examines footraces that are paced and unpaced, and runners who are pre-arranged, designated pacers and those who are not. Although pacesetting is commonplace in footraces today, the practice challenges our conception of sport competition, the nature of competitors and the meaning of records. For example, Bale calls paced races as ‘staged experiments’ to set world records and argues that pacers were crucial in the running career of Roger Bannister. In 2011, the International Association of Athletics Federation banned women’s (...)
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  • Reflections on the Sweet Science.Klaus V. Meier - 1987 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 14 (1):48-59.
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  • Sport, Ethics and Philosophy; Context, History, Prospects.Mike McNamee - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):1 – 6.
    (2007). Sport, ethics and philosophy; context, history, prospects. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.1080/17511320601173329.
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  • Justice in Sport.Sigmund Loland - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):78 – 95.
    An attempt is made to articulate what is seen as a ?thin? interpretation of justice in sport and how this is understood in terms of ?thick? interpretations in various sociocultural settings. In this way, it is argued, sport can be better understood as a dynamic social practice. First, a thin interpretation of justice is formulated. Sport's structural goal is to measure, compare and rank competitors according to their performances. The rule systems of sport are based on more general norms that (...)
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  • The Strange Supremacy of Knowledge in Sport From the Moral Point of View: A Response to Fraleigh.R. Scott Kretchmar - 1986 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 13 (1):79-88.
    The purpose of this article is to show that fraleigh, in "right actions in sport", has not successfully argued for the supremacy of knowledge as an inherent value in sport. this involves a discussion of how fraleigh misapplied criteria from the moral point of view (baier), why he should not have attempted to use these criteria in the first place, and how the application of nonmoral standards fails to show the putative supremacy. "challenge" and "uncertainty" are offered as potentially stronger (...)
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  • Prolegomena to an Expressive Function of Sport.David L. Fairchild - 1987 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 14 (1):21-33.
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  • On Sportsmanship and “Running Up the Score”: Issues of Incompetence and Humiliation.Alun Hardman, Luanne Fox, Doug McLaughlin & Kurt Zimmerman - 1996 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 23 (1):58-69.
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  • Competitive Sport, Winning and Education.Peter J. Arnold - 1989 - Journal of Moral Education 18 (1):15-25.
    Competition in education, school sport in particular, remains a controversial issue. The author recognizes that competition is a contested concept and examines both the 'strong' and 'weak' critiques against the moral desirability of having competitive sport as a part of the compulsory curriculum. The questions of selfishness and of winning are discussed, before the role of the teacher is examined. The author concludes that competitive sport is not per se a form of mis-education. It can be rather, if taught with (...)
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  • Ethics and Sport: An Overview.R. Scott Kretchmar - 1983 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 10 (1):21-32.
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  • PSSS Bibliography of Sport Philosophy—An Update.Joy T. DeSensi - 1985 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 12 (1):101-107.
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  • An Agon Aesthetics of Football.Steffen Borge - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (2):97-123.
    In this article, I first address the ethical considerations about football and show that a meritocratic-fairness view of sports fails to capture the phenomenon of football. Fairness of result is not at centre stage in football. Football is about the drama, about the tension and the emotions it provokes. This moves us to the realm of aesthetics. I reject the idea of the aesthetics of football as the disinterested aesthetic appreciation, which traditionally has been deemed central to aesthetics. Instead, I (...)
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  • Are There Any Good Arguments Against Goal-Line Technology?Emily Ryall - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (4):439-450.
    Despite frequent calls by players, managers and fans, FIFA's resistance to the implementation of goal-line technology (GLT) has been well documented in national print and online media as well as FIFA's own website. In 2010, FIFA president Sepp Blatter outlined eight reasons why GLT should not be used in football. The reasons given by FIFA can be broadly separated into three categories; those dealing with the nature and value of the game of football, those related to issues of justice, and (...)
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  • Sportsmanship.Randolph M. Feezell - 1986 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 13 (1):1-13.
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  • Concerning a Moral Duty to Cheat in Games.Richard Royce - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (3):323-335.
    Stimulated by Hugh Upton's recent article in this journal, in which he argues that there can be a moral duty to cheat in games, I attempt to examine his claims. Much of what he writes revolves around examples from two sports, cricket and rugby, and with differing connections to those games' rules. While the example from cricket is said to involve a breach of the spirit of that game, it is contravention of the written rules of rugby on which the (...)
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  • On Sportsmanship and “Running Up the Score”.Nicholas Dixon - 1992 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 19 (1):1-13.
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  • Philosophical Society for the Study of Sport 1998.Sharon Kay Stall - 1999 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 26 (1):95-104.
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  • Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education in Japan: Its History, Characteristics and Prospects.Takayuki Hata & Masami Sekine - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):215-224.
    In this article, we examine philosophy of sport as a field of study in Japan, its history, characteristics, and future prospects, as part of a contribution to the international development of the discipline of sport philosophy. The Japan Society for the Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education has been holding an annual sport philosophy conference every year since its inception in 1978. Nevertheless, the trends of sport philosophy in Japan have not been conveyed abroad. The language barrier between Japanese and (...)
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  • Review of True Competition: A Guide to Pursuing Excellence in Sport and Society. [REVIEW]Douglas Hochstetler - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (3):341-343.
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  • Pre-Lusory Goals for Games: A Gambit Declined.Angela J. Schneider & Robert B. Butcher - 1997 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):38-46.
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  • Athletes, Excellence, and Injury: Authority In Moral Jeopardy.Peter A. Harmer - 1991 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 18 (1):24-38.
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  • Nothing New Under the Sun: Holism and the Pursuit of Excellence.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (3):230-257.
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  • Lexikon der Ethik im Sport By Ommo Grupe and Dietmar Mieth . Published by Verlag Karl Hofmann, Schorndorf, 1998.Sigmund Loland - 2002 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 29 (2):187-189.
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  • Evaluating Violent Conduct in Sport: A Hierarchy of Vice.Paul Davis & Emily Ryall - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):207-218.
    The landscape of sport shows conspicuous discursive and material disparities between the responses to openly violent on-field transgressors and the responses to other kinds of transgressor, most notably drug users. The former gets off significantly lighter in terms of ideological framing and formal punishment. The latter—and drug users in particular—are typically demonised and heavily punished, whilst the former are regularly lionised, dramatised, celebrated and punished less severely. The preceding disparities cannot be upheld from the standpoint of morality in general or (...)
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