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  1. Make applied phenomenology what it needs to be: an interdisciplinary research program.Matthew Burch - 2021 - Continental Philosophy Review 54 (2):275-293.
    Once a marginal affair, applied phenomenology is now a vast and vibrant movement. With great success, however, comes great criticism, and critics have been harsh, accusing applied phenomenology’s practitioners of everything from spewing nonsense to assailing down-to-earth researchers with gratuitous jargon. In this article, I reconstruct the most damning criticisms as a dilemma: Either applied phenomenology merely describes experience, in which case it offers nothing distinctive, or it involves the kind of analysis characteristic of classical phenomenology, in which case it’s (...)
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  • Some Thoughts on Phenomenology and Medicine.Miguel Kottow - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3):405-412.
    Phenomenology in medicine’s main contribution is to present a first-person narrative of illness, in an effort to aid medicine in reaching an accurate disease diagnosis and establishing a personal relationship with patients whose lived experience changes dramatically when severe disease and disabling condition is confirmed. Once disease is diagnosed, the lived experience of illness is reconstructed into a living-with-disease narrative that medicine’s biological approach has widely neglected. Key concepts like health, sickness, illness, disease and the clinical encounter are being diversely (...)
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  • Should Phenomenological Approaches to Illness Be Wary of Naturalism?Juliette Ferry-Danini - 2019 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 73:10-18.
    In some quarters within philosophy of medicine, more particularly in the phenomenological approaches, naturalism is looked upon with suspicion. This paper argues, first, that it is necessary to distinguish between two expressions of this attitude towards naturalism: phenomenological approaches to illness disagree with naturalism regarding various theoretical claims and they disapprove of naturalism on an ethical level. Second, this paper argues that both the disagreement with and the disapproval of naturalism are to a large extent confused. It then offers some (...)
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  • Gender Medicine and Phenomenological Embodiment.Tania Gergel - 2016 - In The Bloomsbury Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Medicine. Bloomsbury.
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  • The dental anomaly: how and why dental caries and periodontitis are phenomenologically atypical.Dylan Rakhra - 2019 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 14 (1):1-7.
    Despite their shared origins, medicine and dentistry are not always two sides of the same coin. There is a long history in medical philosophy of defining disease and various medical models have come into existence. Hitherto, little philosophical and phenomenological work has been done considering dental caries and periodontitis as examples of disease and illness. A philosophical methodology is employed to explore how we might define dental caries and periodontitis using classical medical models of disease – the naturalistic and normativist. (...)
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  • Illness and Two Meanings of Phenomenology.Horaţiu Traian Crişan & Ion Copoeru - 2020 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 26 (2):425-430.
    When approaching medicine, phenomenology has at least two meanings which need to be distinguished in order to achieve results which might become relevant for medical practice. Up to now, these two meanings have been overlapped by the scholarly literature. Therefore, the purpose of the article is to differentiate between these two meanings. The first one was initiated by Edmund Husserl and takes phenomenology as transcendental, i.e. as a transcendental rigorous science based on the unraveling of transcendental subjectivity/intersubjectivity. The second takes (...)
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  • Philosophy, Medicine and Health Care – Where We Have Come From and Where We Are Going.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Jonathan Fuller, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Kirstin Borgerson, Maya J. Goldenberg & Elselijn Kingma - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):902-907.
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  • Explanation, Understanding, Objectivity and Experience.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Drozdstoj S. Stoyanov, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Kirstin Borgerson, Maya J. Goldenberg & Elselijn Kingma - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):415-421.
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  • Illness Perception, Time Perception and Phenomenology – an Extended Response to Borrett.Tania L. Gergel - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):501-508.
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  • Getting Personal: Can Systems Medicine Integrate Scientific and Humanistic Conceptions of the Patient?Henrik Vogt, Elling Ulvestad, Thor Eirik Eriksen & Linn Getz - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):942-952.
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  • Putting Phenomenology in its Place: Some Limits of a Phenomenology of Medicine.Jonathan7 Sholl - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (6):391-410.
    Several philosophers have recently argued that phenomenology is well-suited to help understand the concepts of health, disease, and illness. The general claim is that by better analysing how illness appears to or is experienced by ill individuals—incorporating the first-person perspective—some limitations of what is seen as the currently dominant third-person or ‘naturalistic’ approaches to understand health and disease can be overcome. In this article, after discussing some of the main insights and benefits of the phenomenological approach, I develop three general (...)
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  • Reason and Value: Making Reasoning Fit for Practice.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Kirstin Borgerson, Vikki Entwistle & Elselijn Kingma - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):929-937.
    Editors' introduction to 3rd thematic issue on philosophy of medicine.
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