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  1. Some Thoughts on Phenomenology and Medicine.Miguel Kottow - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3):405-412.
    Phenomenology in medicine’s main contribution is to present a first-person narrative of illness, in an effort to aid medicine in reaching an accurate disease diagnosis and establishing a personal relationship with patients whose lived experience changes dramatically when severe disease and disabling condition is confirmed. Once disease is diagnosed, the lived experience of illness is reconstructed into a living-with-disease narrative that medicine’s biological approach has widely neglected. Key concepts like health, sickness, illness, disease and the clinical encounter are being diversely (...)
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  • Make applied phenomenology what it needs to be: an interdisciplinary research program.Matthew Burch - 2021 - Continental Philosophy Review 54 (2):275-293.
    Once a marginal affair, applied phenomenology is now a vast and vibrant movement. With great success, however, comes great criticism, and critics have been harsh, accusing applied phenomenology’s practitioners of everything from spewing nonsense to assailing down-to-earth researchers with gratuitous jargon. In this article, I reconstruct the most damning criticisms as a dilemma: Either applied phenomenology merely describes experience, in which case it offers nothing distinctive, or it involves the kind of analysis characteristic of classical phenomenology, in which case it’s (...)
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  • Should Phenomenological Approaches to Illness Be Wary of Naturalism?Juliette Ferry-Danini - 2019 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 73:10-18.
    In some quarters within philosophy of medicine, more particularly in the phenomenological approaches, naturalism is looked upon with suspicion. This paper argues, first, that it is necessary to distinguish between two expressions of this attitude towards naturalism: phenomenological approaches to illness disagree with naturalism regarding various theoretical claims and they disapprove of naturalism on an ethical level. Second, this paper argues that both the disagreement with and the disapproval of naturalism are to a large extent confused. It then offers some (...)
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  • The dental anomaly: how and why dental caries and periodontitis are phenomenologically atypical.Dylan Rakhra - 2019 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 14 (1):1-7.
    Despite their shared origins, medicine and dentistry are not always two sides of the same coin. There is a long history in medical philosophy of defining disease and various medical models have come into existence. Hitherto, little philosophical and phenomenological work has been done considering dental caries and periodontitis as examples of disease and illness. A philosophical methodology is employed to explore how we might define dental caries and periodontitis using classical medical models of disease – the naturalistic and normativist. (...)
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  • The Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine Eds. Thomas Schramme; Steven Edwards [Review]. [REVIEW]Juliette Ferry-Danini - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (5):1087-1089.
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  • A New Path for Humanistic Medicine.Juliette Ferry-Danini - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (1):57-77.
    According to recent approaches in the philosophy of medicine, biomedicine should be replaced or complemented by a humanistic medical model. Two humanistic approaches, narrative medicine and the phenomenology of medicine, have grown particularly popular in recent decades. This paper first suggests that these humanistic criticisms of biomedicine are insufficient. A central problem is that both approaches seem to offer a straw man definition of biomedicine. It then argues that the subsequent definition of humanism found in these approaches is problematically reduced (...)
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  • Understanding Disease and Illness.Jeremy R. Simon, Havi Carel & Alexander Bird - 2017 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 38 (4):239-244.
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  • Phenomenology and its Relevance to Medical Humanities: The Example of Hermann Schmitz’s Theory of Feelings as Half-Things.Mathias Wirth - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):346-352.
    One leitmotif that medical humanities shares with phenomenology and most contemporary medical ethics is emphasising the importance of appreciating the patient as a whole person and not merely as an object. With this also comes a focus on marginalisation and invisibility. However, it is not entirely clear what exactly patient-centred care means. What both phenomenology and medical humanities contribute to a ‘more humane health-care encounter’ is offering not only a first-person perspective, but a dialogue between the third-person perspective and evidence-based (...)
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  • An Instrument to Capture the Phenomenology of Implantable Brain Device Use.Frederic Gilbert, Brown, Dasgupta, Martens, Klein & Goering - forthcoming - Neuroethics.
    One important concern regarding implantable Brain Computer Interfaces is the fear that the intervention will negatively change a patient’s sense of identity or agency. In particular, there is concern that the user will be psychologically worse-off following treatment despite postoperative functional improvements. Clinical observations from similar implantable brain technologies, such as deep brain stimulation, show a small but significant proportion of patients report feelings of strangeness or difficulty adjusting to a new concept of themselves characterized by a maladaptive je ne (...)
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  • A Defense of the Phenomenological Account of Health and Illness.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (4):459-478.
    A large slice of contemporary phenomenology of medicine has been devoted to developing an account of health and illness that proceeds from the first-person perspective when attempting to understand the ill person in contrast and connection to the third-person perspective on his/her diseased body. A proof that this phenomenological account of health and illness, represented by philosophers, such as Drew Leder, Kay Toombs, Havi Carel, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Kevin Aho, and Fredrik Svenaeus, is becoming increasingly influential in philosophy of medicine and (...)
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  • An Instrument to Capture the Phenomenology of Implantable Brain Device Use.Frederic Gilbert, Brown, Dasgupta, Martens, Klein & Goering - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-8.
    One important concern regarding implantable Brain Computer Interfaces is the fear that the intervention will negatively change a patient’s sense of identity or agency. In particular, there is concern that the user will be psychologically worse-off following treatment despite postoperative functional improvements. Clinical observations from similar implantable brain technologies, such as deep brain stimulation, show a small but significant proportion of patients report feelings of strangeness or difficulty adjusting to a new concept of themselves characterized by a maladaptive je ne (...)
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  • I Miss Being Me: Phenomenological Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation.Frederic Gilbert, Eliza Goddard, John Noel M. Viaña, Adrian Carter & Malcolm Horne - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):96-109.
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