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Empire

Utopian Studies 13 (1):148-152 (2002)

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  1. Daniel Bensaïd, Melancholic Strategist.Josep Maria Antentas - 2016 - Historical Materialism 24 (4):51-106.
    Daniel Bensaïd was a Marxist philosopher and author of an extensive body of works about political strategy. His writings combine a diversity of singular influences, such as Marx, Lenin, Trotsky and Che Guevara on the one hand, and Benjamin, Péguy and Blanqui on the other. In his work, religious heresies, Marranos, moles and emblematic figures of the resistance to oppression such as Joan of Arc meet with the classic figures of Marxism. The non-linear concept of time and messianic reason support (...)
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  • Border Struggles: Migration, Subjectivity and the Common.Emanuele Leonardi - 2016 - Historical Materialism 24 (4):244-256.
    The review assesses first and foremost the capability of Mezzadra and Neilson’s book to radically tackle some urgent issues concerning both capital’s regulation of migratory movements and the subjective autonomy these latter incessantly express. The main original contribution of the text is a conception of the border as an epistemic device through which to address and act upon a variety of social processes, from migration policies to labour transformations, from capital’s restructuring to governmental regulations. Subsequently, two crucial topics are critically (...)
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  • Counting Species: Biopower and the Global Biodiversity Census.R. Youatt - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (3):393-417.
    Biopolitical analyses of census -taking usually focus on human censuses and consider how human experience is shaped by the practice. Instead, this article looks at the proposed global biodiversity census, which aims to take inventory of every species on earth as a response to anthropogenic species extinction. I suggest that it is possible to extend and modify Foucault's concept of biopower to consider contemporary human-nonhuman interactions. Specifically, I argue that an ecologically-extended version of biopower offers a useful way to conceptualise (...)
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  • Simpson, His Donkey and the Rest of Us—Public Pedagogies of the Value of Belonging.Georgina Tsolidis - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (4):448-461.
    At the heart of this paper is an exploration of belonging and how this is assumed to connect with a set of values represented as national. There is a particular interest in the relationship between these values and education. Because the significance of the learning that occurs through the public domain outside educational institutions such as schools is assumed, several cultural texts are examined in order to consider public pedagogies of Australianness including iconic displays such as those associated with the (...)
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  • The Promissory Future(s) of Education: Rethinking Scientific Literacy in the Era of Biocapitalism.Clayton Pierce - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (7):721-745.
    This article investigates the biopolitical dimensions that have grown out of the union between biocapitalism and current science education reform in the US. Drawing on science and technology study theorists, I utilize the analytics of promissory valuation and salvationary discourses to understand how scientific literacy in the neo‐Sputnik era has deeply involved educational life in biocapitalist circuits of exchange and production. I lay out this emerging terrain of ‘futuricity’ through a biopolitical analysis of the National Academies highly influential policy recommendation (...)
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  • The Politics of Economy: Roberto Unger.Samuel Moyn - 2002 - Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):135-142.
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  • Network Power and Globalization.David Singh Grewal - 2003 - Ethics and International Affairs 17 (2):89-98.
    With the celebratory view of globalization comes the charge that it represents a kind of empire. But power works in voluntary processes, such as learning English or joining the World Trade Organization. “Network power” may explain the dynamic that drives aspects of globalization.
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  • The Northern Theory of Globalization.Raewyn Connell - 2007 - Sociological Theory 25 (4):368-385.
    Recent sociological theories of globalization represent a second encounter between sociology and global issues. Their underlying concept of "global society" was constructed from an idea of abstract linkage, given content by existing theories about metropolitan society emphasizing modernity, postmodernity, or system dynamics. Antinomies within the globalization theory, such as the global/local opposition and chaotic argument about power, arise from the metropole-centered logic itself, not from conflicts of evidence. The rhetoric and performativity of globalization theory construct a relation with metropolitan audiences, (...)
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  • Whose Sovereignty? Empire Versus International Law.Jean L. Cohen - 2004 - Ethics and International Affairs 18 (3):1-24.
    Where there is an imperial project afoot to develop a version of global right to justify its self-interested interventions, it is dangerous to abandon the default position of sovereignty and the principle of nonintervention in international law.
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  • Empire Versus Multitude: Place Your Bets.Julian Bourg - 2004 - Ethics and International Affairs 18 (3):97-107.
    Julian Bourg reviews Multitude: War and Democracy in the Age of Empire, by Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri; Negri on Negri, by Antonio Negri and Anne Dufourmantelle; Time for Revolution, by Antonio Negri; Debating Empire, edited by Gopal Balakrishnan; and Empire’s New Clothes: Reading Hardt and Negri, edited by Paul Passavant.
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  • Book Review: Ceti Medi Senza Futuro? Scritti, Appunti Sul Lavoro E Altro, Written by Sergio Bologna Book Review: Vita da Freelance. I Lavoratori Della Conoscenza E Il Loro Futuro, Written by Sergio Bologna and Dario Banfi Book Review: Felici E Sfruttati. Capitalismo Digitale Ed Eclissi Del Lavoro, Written by Carlo Formenti. [REVIEW]Marco Boffo - 2014 - Historical Materialism 22 (3-4):425-476.
    This paper reviews the recent writing of Sergio Bologna and Carlo Formenti. These authors are proposed as post-workerist dissenters with respect to Hardt and Negri’s conceptualisation of contemporary capitalism. Therefore, while the latter has risen to prominence within Anglo-American academia astheradical account of the political economy of the knowledge economy, the work of Bologna and Formenti is here presented as providing alternative accounts of contemporary capitalism and its dynamics. In doing so, this work challenges the Anglo-American reception of post-operaismo. However, (...)
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  • Beyond Contemporary Civilizational Crisis of the Human Being and the Humanities. A Chiara Lubich's Perspective.Krzysztof Wielecki - 2017 - Journal for Perspectives of Economic Political and Social Integration 23 (1-2):49-68.
    In this article, I discuss the nature, causes and effects of the crisis of civilization which we can observe for over forty years. This crisis affects social order, with its economic, institutional and demographic dimensions, as well as the culture and the social structure. Here, I am particularly dealing with the question of human person and their relations with others, as well as the humanities. I show globalization, the growth of cancerous mass culture and secularization as a background of the (...)
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  • Critique as Locus or Modus? Power and Resistance in the World of Work.Torben Bech Dyrberg & Peter Triantafillou - 2019 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 20 (1):47-70.
    How and from where can power be criticized and resisted? The advent of new managerial forms of power has brought the question once more to the fore. One of the salient issues is whether the ubiquity and apparent omnipotence of contemporary forms of managerial power renders critique and resistance difficult. This article compares the critical potential of French pragmatic sociology and Foucauldian-inspired genealogy. We argue that both approaches offer viable critiques of contemporary forms of power. Yet, whereas the critique of (...)
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  • Agonistic Pluralism and Stakeholder Engagement.Cedric Dawkins - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (1):1-28.
    ABSTRACT:This paper argues that, although stakeholder engagement occurs within the context of power, neither market-centered CSR nor the deliberative model of political CSR adequately addresses the specter of power asymmetries and the inevitability of conflict in stakeholder relations, particularly for powerless stakeholders. Noting that the objective of stakeholder engagement should not be benevolence toward stakeholders, but mechanisms that address power asymmetries such that stakeholders are able to protect their own interests, I present a framework of stakeholder engagement based on agonistic (...)
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  • A Living Constituent Power and Law as a Guideline in Walter Benjamin's “Critique of Violence”.Hjalte Lokdam - 2019 - Constellations 26 (2):208-224.
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  • Recognizing Argument Types and Adding Missing Reasons.Christoph Lumer - 2019 - In Bart J. Garssen, David Godden, Gordon Mitchell & Jean Wagemans (eds.), Proceedings of the Ninth Conference of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation (ISSA). [Amsterdam, July 3-6, 2018.]. Amsterdam (Netherlands): pp. 769-777.
    The article develops and justifies, on the basis of the epistemological argumentation theory, two central pieces of the theory of evaluative argumentation interpretation: 1. criteria for recognizing argument types and 2. rules for adding reasons to create ideal arguments. Ad 1: The criteria for identifying argument types are a selection of essential elements from the definitions of the respective argument types. Ad 2: After presenting the general principles for adding reasons (benevolence, authenticity, immanence, optimization), heuristics are proposed for finding missing (...)
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  • Il diritto all'acqua come diritto sociale e come diritto collettivo.Danilo Zolo - 2005 - Jura Gentium 2:87-102.
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  • Biopolitical Marketing and Social Media Brand Communities.Detlev Zwick & Alan Bradshaw - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (5):91-115.
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  • Philosophy, Science, and Virtual Communism.Andrew Culp - 2015 - Angelaki 20 (4):91-107.
    This paper considers how science, philosophy, and “the virtual” inform the political potential of the communism that emerges within capitalism. It looks to the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, in particular What is Philosophy?, to set the terms of an anti-capitalist science and philosophy. Their understanding of the contrasting roles of the virtual in science and philosophy is then used to draw points of distinction between the theories of Manuel DeLanda, Jason Read, and Maurizio Lazzarato. DeLanda's work demonstrates (...)
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  • Global Workers’ Rights Through Capitalist Institutions?Ashok Kumar - 2015 - Historical Materialism 23 (3):215-227.
    InWorkers, Unions, and Global Capitalism: Lessons from India, Rohini Hensman maintains that globalisation has afforded workers new opportunities for confronting capitalist exploitation. Using India as a point of departure, Hensman highlights globalisation as paradoxical, challenging anti-globalisers and the globalisation-as-imperialism thesis, to argue that capital’s toilers are now becoming its gravediggers. This analysis also explains why the World Trade Organization is so appealing to Hensman: a quintessence of capitalism’s contradictions. Hensman argues for both transnational solidarity and independent trade unions, embodied in (...)
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  • Agamben’s Uses of Wittgenstein: An Overall Critical Assessment.Andrea Di Gesu - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 45 (8):907-929.
    Agamben has often made explicit references to the reflexion of Wittgenstein: it is thus surprising to note that this important influence of his philosophy has been almost completely ignored. In thi...
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  • AFFECT: An Unworkable Concept.Scott Sharpe & Maria Hynes - 2015 - Angelaki 20 (3):115-129.
    Somewhere between use and mere whim there is a place for the expressivity of affect as a concept. This paper raises the question of how the concept of affect might be mobilized without reducing its expressions to the logic of work. We suggest that the very attempt to put affect to work in order to solve pressing problems may be symptomatic of an anxiety to master the events of the world. With this in mind, we make a case for the (...)
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  • The Rebirth of the Death of God: Radical Theology Politicized, Political Theology Radicalized, and Radical Politics Theologized in the Work of Clayton Crockett and Jeffrey Robbins.Mary-Jane Rubenstein - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):273 - 281.
    This article offers a critical reflection on the mutually resonant recent works of Clayton Crockett and Jeffrey Robbins, both of whom expose “radical theology” as insufficiently political, “political theology” as insufficiently radical, and “radical politics” as insufficiently attuned to theology. In light of these shortcomings, they offer a radical political theology as a “necessary supplement” to the project of radical democracy—which is to say a politics of, by, and for “the multitude.” This article tracks the shifting and occasionally conflicting contours (...)
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  • The Rebirth of the Death of God: Radical Theology Politicized, Political Theology Radicalized, and Radical Politics Theologized in the Work of Clayton Crockett and Jeffrey Robbins.Mary-Jane Rubenstein - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):273-281.
    This article offers a critical reflection on the mutually resonant recent works of Clayton Crockett and Jeffrey Robbins, both of whom expose “radical theology” as insufficiently political, “political theology” as insufficiently radical, and “radical politics” as insufficiently attuned to theology. In light of these shortcomings, they offer a radical political theology as a “necessary supplement” to the project of radical democracy—which is to say a politics of, by, and for “the multitude.” This article tracks the shifting and occasionally conflicting contours (...)
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  • Capitalism with a Human Face: Neoliberal Ideology in Neill Blomkamp's District 9.Stephen Trinder - 2019 - Film-Philosophy 23 (1):1-16.
    This article analyses Neill Blomkamp's Academy Award-winning District 9 to investigate the extent to which popular cinema might support neoliberal ideological positions. It draws upon Slavoj...
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  • Control and Cinema: Intolerable Poverty and the Films of Béla Tarr.Phillip Roberts - 2017 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 11 (1):68-94.
    In Cinema 2 Deleuze conceptualises the time-image as a cinema of infinite variation, opening the stable forms of the movement-image to an unformed and virtual outside. Five years later he would develop a similar analysis in the short ‘Postscript on the Societies of Control’, arguing that a new system of organisation was expanding the disciplinary formations that had reached their peak in the first part of the twentieth century. In both works Deleuze explores a world in the process of systemic (...)
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  • The Many Encounters of Deleuze and Marxism.Panagiotis Sotiris - 2016 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 10 (3):301-320.
    Deleuze's and Guattari's work on schizoanalysis represented an important shift towards a dialogue with Marx and his critique of political economy but in the 1970s prominent Marxists attacked Deleuze as anti-Marxist. This attitude marked one of the most important missed encounters between Marxism and other theoretical currents. However, there have been important recent contributions that bring forward not only the political character of Deleuze's theoretical endeavour, his critique of capitalist social forms, his conception of social practice and struggle, but also (...)
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  • Saints, Jesters and Nomads: The Anomalous Pedagogies of Lacan, Žižek, … Deleuze and Guattari.Jan Jagodzinski - 2015 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 9 (3):356-381.
    In this essay I bring together Lacan, Žižek, Deleuze and Guattari as mediators and intercessors for one another. The tensions that exist between them still continue to reverberate throughout the academic community. The intent is to query their pedagogies in what they are trying to ‘do’ within the context of capitalism in particular. I have called their pedagogies anomalous in keeping with their thrust of becoming other in their own particular ways through what I take to be three pedagogical conceptual (...)
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  • Deleuze, the ‘Neo-Realist’ Break and the Emergence of Chinese Any-Now-Spaces.David H. Fleming - 2014 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 8 (4):509-541.
    By creatively expanding Deleuze's concept of the time-image crystal, I productively fold together and engineer an encounter between two comparable cinematic movements otherwise separated by huge vistas of time and space. Here, I work to plicate the post-war Italian neorealist movement which Deleuze saw inaugurating the modern cinema, with a ‘postsocialist’ mainland Chinese movement that I playfully call ‘neo-realism’. The films of both historical moments formulate comparable break-away cinemas which are often considered moral or socially responsible art cinemas best approached (...)
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  • Desire and Ethics.Ian Buchanan - 2011 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 5 (Suppl):7-20.
    This paper argues that it is problematic for the future of Deleuze studies that it is difficult if not impossible to answer the question ‘what is the right thing to do?’ from a Deleuzian perspective. It then argues that one of the key reasons Deleuze studies has made limited progress in this area is its over-emphasis on desire and the corresponding tendency to extrapolate ‘ought’ from ‘is’, which as Hume showed is a category mistake. It proposes that to develop a (...)
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  • Beyond Bartleby and Bad Faith: Thinking Critically with Sartre and Deleuze.Dominic Smith - 2013 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 7 (1):83-105.
    This essay argues that important critical and political perspective can be gained on Deleuze's famous essay, ‘Bartleby; or, The Formula’ by viewing it as an attempt to move beyond the Sartrean framework of ‘bad faith’. The argument comprises four sections. In section one, I contextualise Deleuze's essay in terms of contrasting readings of Bartleby, from a prior account by Georges Perec, to contemporary accounts indebted to Deleuze, from Hardt and Negri's Empire to Gisèle Berkman's recent L'Effet Bartleby. The argument of (...)
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  • Introduction: Félix Guattari in the Age of Semiocapitalism.Gary Genosko - 2012 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 6 (2):149-169.
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  • Autism: Schizo of Postmodern Capital.Christina Taylor & Hans A. Skott-Myhre - 2011 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 5 (1):35-48.
    This article follows Deleuze in investigating the ways in which the symptom as a form of representation can be collapsed into immanence. Exploring the symptoms of schizophrenia and autism, it examines what implications such a collapse may have for the production of the symptom in its double articulation as representation and immanent production. The argument follows Deleuze and Guattari in asserting that symptoms hold an implicit limit for the social forms that deploy them. Arguing that schizophrenia, as one such limit, (...)
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  • Defining Activism.Marcelo Svirsky - 2010 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 4 (Suppl):163-182.
    Activism is defined in this paper as involving local instigations of new series of elements intersecting the actual, generating new collective enunciations, experimentations and investigations, which erode good and common sense and cause structures to swing away from their sedimented identities. By appealing to Spinozism, the paper describes the microphysics of the activist encounter with stable structures and the ways in which activism imposes new regimes of succession of ideas and affective variations in the power of action. Rather than understanding (...)
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  • The Common as Body Without Organs.Vidar Thorsteinsson - 2010 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 4 (Suppl):46-63.
    The paper explores the relation of Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri's work to that of Deleuze and Guattari. The main focus is on Hardt and Negri's concept of ‘the common’ as developed in their most recent book Commonwealth. It is argued that the common can complement what Nicholas Thoburn terms the ‘minor’ characteristics of Deleuze's political thinking while also surpassing certain limitations posed by Hardt and Negri's own previous emphasis on ‘autonomy-in-production’. With reference to Marx's notion of real subsumption and (...)
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  • Life Resistance: Towards a Different Concept of the Political.Brad Evans - 2010 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 4 (Suppl):142-162.
    In an attempt to reaffirm Deleuze's Nietzschean affinities, this article argues that it is possible to detect in his thought an alternative concept of the political which gives ontological priority to difference. In order to map this out, a Deleuzian reading of the Zapatista experience will be provided, with particular attention given to the manner in which power is re-conceptualised, resistance strategised, subjectivities recast, and political solidarities formed anew. Once this has been established, the paper will argue that not only (...)
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  • Politics in the Middle: For a Political Interpretation of the Dualisms in Deleuze and Guattari.Rodrigo Nunes - 2010 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 4 (Suppl):104-126.
    The paper identifies three recent lines of interpretation of the politics that can be derived from Deleuze and Guattari, all of which share a way of reading the dualisms in their work that can be traced back to how they understand the actual/virtual partition, and to an alleged pre-eminence of the virtual over the actual. It is argued that this reading is not only inaccurate, but obscures the political dimension of Deleuze and Guattari's work. Clarifying the latter requires a reinterpretation (...)
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  • Critical Forces: True Critique or Mere Criticism of Deleuze Contra Hegel?Kane X. Faucher - 2010 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 4 (3):329-355.
    The principal concern of this paper is to track the first wave of criticism directed against Deleuze's relation to Hegelianism as it has appeared in the English-speaking world. To this end, we assess the criticisms offered by Stephen Houlgate, Judith Butler, and Catherine Malabou, each of whom, in their respective ways, accuse Deleuze of misreading Hegel, claiming that his rejection of Hegelianism merely reinforces a secret or unacknowledged Hegelianism inherent in his own critique. Despite the brisk treatment Houlgate grants Deleuze, (...)
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  • McDeleuze: What's More Rhizomal Than the Big Mac?Kane X. Faucher - 2010 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 4 (1):42-59.
    The popularity of Deleuze and Guattari is an undeniable precedent in current theoretical exchanges, and it could be stated without much contention that one's theoretical positioning must at some point deal with the salient conceptual offerings of Deleuze and Guattari, especially their double-opus, Anti-Oedipus and A Thousand Plateaus wherein a wealth of critique abounds. However, the significant trends concerning Deleuze and Guattari ‘scholarship’ may be jeopardised by the use of certain conceptual themes and methods in their work that are distorted (...)
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  • The Marx of Anti-Oedipus.Aidan Tynan - 2009 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 3 (Suppl):28-52.
    The meeting of Deleuze and Guattari in 1969 is generally used to explain how the former's thought became politicised under the influence of the latter. This narrative, however useful it might be in explaining Deleuze's move away from the domain of academic philosophy following the upheavals of May 1968, has had the effect of de-emphasising the conceptual development which occurred between Difference and Repetition and Anti-Oedipus. Worst of all, it has had the effect of reducing the role of Marx's philosophy (...)
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  • Deleuze, Marx and the Politicisation of Philosophy.Simon Choat - 2009 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 3 (Suppl):8-27.
    Against those who wish to marginalise Deleuze's political relevance, this paper argues that his work – including and especially that produced before his collaborations with Guattari – is not only fundamentally political but also profoundly engaged with Marx. The paper begins by focusing on different possible strategies for contesting the claim that Deleuze is apolitical, attempting to debunk this claim by briefly considering Deleuze's work with Guattari. The bulk of the paper is concerned with a close examination of the appearance (...)
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  • Minor Marxism: An Approach to a New Political Praxis.Eduardo Pellejero - 2009 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 3 (Suppl):102-118.
    In 1990, Antonio Negri pointed out some problems with Deleuze's political philosophy. Substituting infra-structures for life or desire, as constitutive dimensions of power formations, did not imply giving up on Marx, but it certainly did imply a change in the table of conceptual analysis and a profound renovation of the questions that pertain to militant praxis. Taking this into account, we intend to explore the sense of a rare fidelity to Marx, and a certain idea of intellectual commitment that, reframing (...)
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  • From Negation to Disjunction in a World of Simulacra: Deleuze and Melanie Klein.Nathan Widder - 2009 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 3 (2):207-230.
    This paper will articulate an underappreciated side of the psychoanalytical Deleuze: his relation to Melanie Klein, particularly as it appears in The Logic of Sense. Deleuze's engagement with Klein largely follows his familiar strategy of re-reading a thinker off of a twist in one or two of that thinker's key concepts. With Klein, this twist involves re-reading her story of psychic development on the basis of disjunction rather than negation, so that the psychic surface that emerges generates a persistent non-correspondence (...)
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  • Expression, Immanence and Constructivism: 'Spinozism' and Gilles Deleuze.Thomas Nail - 2008 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 2 (2):201-219.
    This paper is an attempt to explicate the relationship between Spinozist expressionism and philosophical constructivism in Deleuze's work through the concept of immanent causality. Deleuze finds in Spinoza a philosophy of immanent causality used to solve the problem of the relation between substance, attribute and mode as an expression of substance. But, when he proceeds to take up this notion of immanent causality found in Spinoza in Difference and Repetition, Deleuze instead inverts it into a modal one such that the (...)
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  • Matter Without Bodies.Claire Colebrook - 2011 - Derrida Today 4 (1):1-20.
    Materialism is at once the most general of concepts, capable of gesturing to anything that seems either foundational or physicalist, and yet is also one of the most rhetorical of gestures: operating as a way of reducing, criticising or ‘‘exorcising’’ forms of idealism and ideology. Derrida's early, supposedly ‘‘textualist’’ works appear to endorse a materiality of the letter (including syntax, grammar, trace and writing) while the later works focus on matter as split between that which is posited and that which (...)
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  • Colonia and Imperium.Robert J. C. Young - 2015 - Paragraph 38 (2):277-282.
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  • Heart of the Matter: Bodies Without Organs and Biopolitics in Organ Transplant Films.Patricia Pisters - 2014 - Angelaki 19 (4):23-36.
    :In this essay I will look at four recent films that have organ transplantations “at their heart”: 21 Grams, L'Intrus, Dirty Pretty Things and Heart of Jenin. Each film in its own way shows how Nancy's concept of the intruder balances in a different dynamics between biopolitical and biophilosophical concerns and proposes in various ways a changed concept of sacrifice, transforming sacrifice from religious offering into political or ethical resistance and allowing a-religious strivings to persist.
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  • The State of the Digital Humanities: A Report and a Critique.Alan Liu - 2012 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 11 (1-2):8-41.
    The scholarly field of the digital humanities has recently expanded and integrated its fundamental concepts, historical coverage, relationship to social experience, scale of projects, and range of interpretive approaches. All this brings the overall field to a tipping point where it has the potential not just to facilitate the work of the humanities but to represent the state of the humanities at large in its changing relation to higher education in the postindustrial state. Are the digital humanities up to this (...)
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  • Book Review: Karl Marx on Technology and Alienation, Written by Amy E. Wendling. [REVIEW]Tom Bunyard - 2014 - Historical Materialism 22 (3-4):505-519.
    Amy Wendling contends in this book that Marx’s concern with alienation is not restricted to his early, more explicitly Hegelian writings, and that it can be seen to evolve throughout his work in tandem with his interest in technology. This evolution, according to Wendling, is marked by his transition between two successive scientific paradigms, both of which pertain to the status of labour and machinery within society. Wendling claims that Marx uses the distinction between them as a means of conducting (...)
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  • Migration and Cooperative Infrastructures.Lorenzo Del Savio, Giulia Cavaliere & Matteo Mameli - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 32 (3):425-444.
    A proper understanding of the moral and political significance of migration requires a focus on global inequalities. More specifically, it requires a focus on those global inequalities that affect people’s ability to participate in the production of economic goods and non-economic goods. We call cooperative infrastructures the complex material and immaterial technologies that allow human beings to cooperate in order to generate human goods. By enabling migrants to access high-quality cooperative infrastructures, migration contributes to the diffusion of technical and socio-political (...)
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