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Revolution in Poetic Language

Columbia University Press (1984)

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  1. Towards a 'Poethics of Love': Poststructuralist Ethics and Literary Creation.Margaret E. Toye - 2010 - Feminist Theory 11 (1):39-55.
    While ethics has become accepted as an important field of inquiry within Anglo-American critical and feminist theory, the same thing cannot be said about ‘love’. I argue that ‘love’ needs to be taken as a serious, valid and crucial subject for academic study, and that feminist theory should have a special investment in the topic. Phenomenological theories of pain and psychoanalytic theories of melancholy can provide a negative definition of love by describing situations where love has lost its objects. These (...)
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  • Reconstituting the Subject: Feminism, Modernism, and Postmodernism.Susan Hekman - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (2):44-63.
    Political agency is vital to the formulation of a feminist politics so feminists have attempted to create a subject that eschews the sexism of the Cartesian subject while at the same time retaining agency. This paper examines some of the principal feminist attempts to reconstitute the subject along these lines. It assesses the success of these attempts in light of the question of whether the subject is a necessary component of feminist theory and practice.
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  • Subject to Empowerment: The Constitution of Power in an Educational Program for Health Professionals.Truls I. Juritzen, Eivind Engebretsen & Kristin Heggen - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):443-455.
    Empowerment and user participation represents an ideal of power with a strong position in the health sector. In this article we use text analysis to investigate notions of power in a program plan for health workers focusing on empowerment. Issues addressed include: How are relationships of power between users and helpers described in the program plan? Which notions of user participation are embedded in the plan? The analysis is based on Foucault’s idea that power which is made subject to attempts (...)
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  • The Constitution of the Subject: Primary Repression After Kristeva and Laplanche.Anthony Elliott - 2005 - European Journal of Social Theory 8 (1):25-42.
    This article traces recent developments in European social theory and psychoanalysis on the theory of the human subject. Critically examining the recent psychoanalytic departures of Julia Kristeva and Jean Laplanche on the status of primary repression as a condition for the constitution of subjectivity, an analysis is presented of the state of the subject in its unconscious relational world. The article suggests ways in which the analyses set out by Kristeva and Laplanche can be further refined and developed, partly through (...)
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  • Slicing through Thin Layers of Humanity: Narratives of the Abject.Robin Kanak Zwier - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (4):501-513.
    This essay examines narratives about cadaver dissection through the lens of psychoanalytic theory in order to better understand the nature of medical students’ socialization into medicine and its implications for physician-patient communication. The theoretical framework provided by Julia Kristeva focuses attention on the nature of subject-formation in relation to abjection – that which reveals the contingent nature of the speaking self. Analysis of memoirs and other narratives by medical students demonstrates that students encounter the abject in the process of dissecting (...)
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  • Body Ground Red – Integrating Peirce, Kristeva and Greimas.Herman Tamminen - 2021 - Sign Systems Studies 48 (2-4):368-391.
    Ground – regardless whether it be taken as motivation or abstractness – affords the proposition that some abstract categories of meaning have acquired their qualities via bodily experience. In order to show this to be the case, the concept of ground will be drawn together with the division between the symbolic and the semiotic, the semiotic chora will be shown to function as an axiologizing thymic category as regard reception of perception, and finally it will be proposed that it is (...)
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  • Word and Image: Framing Philology.Axel Fliethmann - 2007 - Thesis Eleven 89 (1):43-57.
    This text focuses from a philological perspective on media theories and their impact on traditional text-based disciplines. Therefore it looks at the problems that have emerged for Media Studies as well as for traditional studies in philology when reflecting on the concept of self-reference, since their subjects can seemingly no longer rely on the purity of the written word. If research work in the field of humanities is still mainly documented by texts, how does the advance of images as a (...)
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  • Plato’s Creative Imagination: (Re)Membering the Chora(L) Love That We Are.Cheryl Lynch-Lawler - 2019 - Feminist Theology 28 (1):104-123.
    The Platonic chora, as the third, intermediating term, has been left in a state of virtual dereliction in the West. Its ternary logic transmutes oppositional logics of binarity, including the oppositions of interior and exterior, psyche and cosmos, human and divine. In this article I analyse the mytho-philosophical trajectory of the chora from Plato’s Timaeus, and Diotimaic love found in Plato’s Symposium. I argue that both the disruptive force of Diotimaic love, and the subversive chora with its ‘bastard reasoning’1 are (...)
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  • Subjects-in-Process/ on-Trial: The Construction of Teacher Subjects in an Early Field Experience Course.Jacqueline Bach - 2008 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 17 (1):3-12.
    Increased standardization of teacher education programs urges a reconsideration of how pre-service teacher identities are constructed/being constructed and evaluated. The purpose of my study was to examine the writings of pre-service teachers enrolled in an early field experiences course in order to identify moments in which they interacted, negotiated, and subverted the teacher-making process, which they officially enter during the semester they take this course. I approach this question from a philosophical viewpoint, and I use the theories of French post-structuralist, (...)
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  • A Short Study on Spinoza's View of Religion.İbrahim Okan Akkın - 2018 - In Roman Dorczak, Christian Ruggiero, Regina-Lenart Gansiniec & M. Ali Icbay (eds.), Research and Development on Social Sciences. Kraków, Poland: Jagiellonian University. pp. 225-232.
    It is a matter of philosophical debate whether Jonathan Israel’s assessment of Spinoza’s notion of ‘state religion’ can be interpreted as an atheistic and Marxist reading of Spinoza. Contrary to the widely accepted view, Spinoza has a peculiar understanding of religion; and thus, his views cannot, simply, be equated with atheism. By relying on this fact, in this article, I am going to shed light on the issue and try to show to what extent Israel’s interpretation goes beyond what Spinoza (...)
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  • Conflicted Love.Kelly Oliver - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (3):1-18.
    Our stereotypes of maternity and paternity as manifest in the history of philosophy and psychoanalysis interfere with the ability to imagine loving relationships. The associations of maternity with antisocial nature and paternity with disembodied culture are inadequate to set up primary love relationships. Analyzing the conflicts in these associations, I reformulate the maternal body as social and lawful, and I reformulate the paternal function as embodied, which enables imagining our primary relationships as loving.
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  • A Whole New World:: Remaking Masculinity in the Context of the Environmental Movement.Robert W. Connell - 1990 - Gender and Society 4 (4):452-478.
    The impact of feminism on men has produced both backlash and attempts to reconstruct masculinity. The Australian environmental movement, strongly influenced by countercultural ideas, is a case in which feminist pressure has produced significant attempts at change among men. These are explored through life-history interviews founded on a practice-based theory of gender. Six life histories are traced through three dialectical moments: engagement with hegemonic masculinity; separation focused on an individualized remaking of the self, involving an attempt to undo oedipal masculinization; (...)
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  • Reading Digital Denmark: IT Reports as Material-Semiotic Actors.Peter Lauritsen & Casper Bruun Jensen - 2005 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 30 (3):352-373.
    During the past decade, several governmental reports have discussed how information technology can transform Danish society. Most important among these reports is Digital Denmark from 1999.In this article, the authors examine how to analyze Digital Denmark by considering two strategies for engaging reports. The first aims at uncovering and making explicit hidden assumptions or ideologies in the text. This approach is called “reading against the text.” The second approach—inspired by science, technology, and society studies—considers where a text goes and what (...)
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  • Missing Mother: Migrant Mothers, Maternal Surrogates, and the Global Economy of Care.Jean P. Tan - 2012 - Thesis Eleven 112 (1):113-132.
    A longitudinal perspective on motherhood that spans the experience of gestation, birthing, the care of young children, and the mother’s relation to her grown children makes way for a conception of the mother as essentially plural. It shall be argued in this paper that maternity is necessarily tied to surrogacy, that it is divided into a multiplicity of tasks inevitably parceled out to multiple agents. In this essay, the analysis of maternal surrogacy is focused on the phenomenon of mothering from (...)
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  • Subjects Through Translation.Lucy Tatman - 2011 - European Journal of Women's Studies 18 (4):425-430.
    A phenomenological account of an extended encounter with feminist theory in translation, the entirety of ‘Subjects through translation’ is best condensed in these three lines from the poet Adrienne Rich: it will be short, it will not be simple // You are coming into us who cannot withstand you // you are taking parts of us into places never planned. What is it like to read text after text in translation? How do familiar words become so strange? How to express (...)
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  • Julia Kristeva, ‘Woman’s Primary Homosexuality’ and Homophobia.Sylvie Gambaudo - 2013 - European Journal of Women's Studies 20 (1):8-20.
    This article offers a critical reading of what Julia Kristeva calls ‘woman’s primary homosexuality’ and discusses homophobia in Kristeva’s work. If we are to draw conclusions on the merits and limitations of Kristeva’s theories of sexuality, homophobia needs to be assessed within the aesthetic and ethical contexts that typify Kristeva’s overall oeuvre. The article shows that we can apply Kristeva’s semiotic/symbolic model of signification to sexuality and argues for the construction of ‘primary homosexuality’ as the manifestation of resistance to authorized (...)
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  • Exiles From Power: Marginality and the Female Self in Postcommunist and Postcolonial Spaces.Maria-Sabina Draga-Alexandru - 2000 - European Journal of Women's Studies 7 (3):355-366.
    This article relates two forms of political and cultural marginality and emancipation to a third one, which, in traditional patriarchal cultures, is the embodiment of marginality par excellence: that of the female self. It explores their similar positioning in the spatial and temporal economy of power relations in a detailed analysis of Irina Grigorescu Pana's novel Melbourne Sundays, a fictionallyrical account of the Romanian author's 11-year exile in Australia, read as a narrative counterpart of her critical approach to exile in (...)
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  • New Individualist Configurations and the Social Imaginary: Castoriadis and Kristeva.Anthony Elliott - 2012 - European Journal of Social Theory 15 (3):349-365.
    The broad purpose of this article is to explore the theoretical conditions for understanding the new individualist configurations of imagination and identity in contemporary culture and critical discourse. The article begins with a sketch of recent debates in social theory on identity, individualization and new individualism, focusing on the work of Giddens, Beck, and Bauman, as well as Lemert and Elliott. The second part of the article turns to consider, in some detail, the path breaking contributions of Cornelius Castoriadis on (...)
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  • Becoming a (Virile) Member: Women and the Military Body.Heather J. Höpfl - 2003 - Body and Society 9 (4):13-30.
    This article seeks to examine the process by which women are incorporated into the military body and considers the extent to which this is achieved both by demonstrating mastery and by the acquisition of the metaphorical penis. Specifically, the article puts forward the view that incorporation into the military body is achieved via a cancellation of the feminine. Women, it is argued, can either be playthings or else quasi men. The point is, and this is the meaning of the title, (...)
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  • Intersubjective Openings: Rethinking Feminist Psychoanalytics of Desire Beyond Heteronormative Ambivalence.Susan Driver - 2005 - Feminist Theory 6 (1):5-24.
    This essay explores notions of maternal desire within feminist psychoanalysis with an interest in challenging heteronormative frameworks of analysis. Providing close critical readings of texts by Jessica Benjamin, Julia Kristeva, Kaja Silverman and Hortense Spillers, I trace conceptual openings through which to interpret maternal sexuality as a mobile process of intersubjectivity that is grounded in changing historical relations of experience. I argue that Spillers’ approach transforms a critical process of reading desire away from the insularities and exclusions of conventional psychoanalytic (...)
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  • Archaeologies and Utopias: Reassessing Kristeva's Relevance to Feminist Literary Practice.Tracy Johnson - 2002 - Feminist Theory 3 (2):169-181.
    The predominance of patriarchally-based structures in Kristeva's work sets up an uncomfortable dichotomy for feminist critics. Her 1979 essay `Le temps des femmes' most explicitly articulates her own approach to feminism, addressing women's troubled relationship to patriarchy in terms of time and space. Kristeva identifies three distinct positions in feminist thought: `equality', `difference' and an anticipated `third generation' feminism that integrates the previous two attitudes, representing what she defines as a new `signifying space'. The value of the `third space' is (...)
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  • Thérèse Mon Amour: Julia Kristeva’s St. Teresa of Avila.Elizabeth Coles - 2016 - Feminist Theology 24 (2):156-170.
    This essay reads Julia Kristeva’s ‘novel-essay’ on St. Teresa of Avila, Thérèse mon amour, as a form of relationship to literature we can also see suggested, though not theorized, in Kristeva’s critical thought. Thérèse mon amour performs feats of interpretation and intimacy with St. Teresa’s writing that rehearse key tenets of her theology, but that also revive and re-open questions at the heart of Kristeva’s theoretical matrix, questions of narcissism and love, metaphor and language. The essay traces these questions in (...)
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  • Catholic Mothers and Daughters: Becoming Women.Anne Keary - 2016 - Feminist Theology 24 (2):187-205.
    The socio-historical events and libertarian cultural movements of the 1960s and 1970s shaped the Catholic mother-daughter relationship for the women in this feminist genealogical study. This study is based on interviews with 36 Anglo-Australian Catholic women – 13 sets of mothers and daughters – as well as dialogue between my mother and myself about family photographs. Women’s stories of secondary school days tell of the formation of lady-like identities circumscribed through uniform regulations, the cult of the Virgin Mary and ceremonies (...)
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  • Matter, Freedom and the Future: Reframing Feminist Theologies Through an Ecological Materialist Lens1.Anne Elvey - 2015 - Feminist Theology 23 (2):186-204.
    An ecological focus is not simply an additional perspective to add to a multidimensional approach to feminist theologies. Ecological thinking requires a fundamental shift of perspective, so that the focus of feminism, traditionally a human focus, is rethought within the frame of the materiality that constitutes not only humans but Earth and cosmos. As a way of situating feminist theological discourses and experiences ecologically, this article focuses on a shared materiality as a basis for reframing human being, dwelling, agency and (...)
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  • The Play of the Semiotic and the Symbolic: The Authenticity of the Life of Mother Maria Skobtsova.Katerina Bauerova - 2014 - Feminist Theology 22 (3):290-301.
    This article deals with the issue of innovation in church tradition, more specifically in Orthodoxy. Using as an example the admittedly untypical life of Mother Maria Skobtsova, an Orthodox nun living in France after the 1917 revolution in Russia, the article shows how the creative moments of her life, which shaped the church tradition in exile, can be also viewed from a psychoanalytical perspective. With the help of French psychoanalyst Julia Kristeva, the creative changes Mother Maria brought to church tradition (...)
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  • Alice Notley's Disobedient Cities.Zoë Skoulding - 2010 - Feminist Review 96 (1):89-105.
    The American poet Alice Notley has described one of her goals as being to take up ‘as much literary space as any male poet’, a phrase that questions the nature of ‘literary space’, and its relationship to material and political spaces. In Disobedience, as in her earlier book The Descent of Alette, the city is imagined in relation to what lies beneath it. Both of these extended poem sequences set up urban underground geographies, Alette – a mythical underground of caves (...)
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  • ‘Great Expectations’: Rehabilitating the Recalcitrant War Poets.Gill Plain - 1995 - Feminist Review 51 (1):41-65.
    Formulating a definition of ‘good’ poetry is, and should be, impossible. Yet women's poetry of the First World War seems generally to have been condemned as ‘bad’. It inspires an ambiguous response from readers who recognize the value of its historical, social and psychological content, but shudder at the limitations of its form. However, I believe that a much more fruitful reading of these ‘recalcitrant’ texts is possible. It is not my intention to deny either their problematic nature, or the (...)
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  • Provisional Pleasures: The Challenge of Contemporary Experimental Women Poets.Harriet Tarlo - 1999 - Feminist Review 62 (1):94-112.
    This article is an introduction to contemporary experimental poetry by women. It considers the reasons for the resistance to such work in this country. It refutes arguments made against it, for example that avant-garde writing is elitist or not related to women's experience. It further suggests why this writing, in particular in its complex engagement with issues of language, subjectivity and gender, should in fact be of great interest to the woman/feminist reader. In particular, it suggests parallels between the concerns (...)
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  • Abundant Body Narratives: Re-Visioning the Theological Embodiment of Women Through Feminist Theology and Art as a Way of Flourishing.Megan Clay - 2017 - Feminist Theology 25 (3):248-256.
    One of my projects as a Research Fellow for The Institute for Theological Partnerships at the University of Winchester is the Feminist Theology and Art Forum. This project was born out of my Doctoral thesis which combines both art and feminist liberation theologies. Thus creating a methodology in which art as language gives voice to women’s experience within the theological world. The Forum so far has opened a window of opportunity for female artists and feminist theologians alike to exhibit visual (...)
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  • Existence and the Communicatively Competent Self.Martin Beck Matus - 1999 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (3):93-120.
    Most readers of Habermas would not classify him as an existential thinker. The view of Habermas as a philosopher in German Idealist and Critical traditions from Kant to Hegel and Marx to the Frankfurt School prevails among Continental as much as among analytic philosophers. And the mainstream Anglo-American reception of his work and politics is shaped by the approaches of formal analysis rather than those of existential and social phenomenology or even current American pragmatism. One may argue that both these (...)
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  • Maternal and Paternal Functions in the Formation of Subjectivity: Kristeva and Lacan.Gavin Rae - 2019 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (4):412-430.
    The Kristeva–Lacan relationship has been a difficult one, with commentators tending to either collapse the former into the latter or insist on an absolute division wherein Kristeva emphasizes the m...
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  • Rethinking the Sexual Contract: The Case of Thomas Hobbes.Lorenzo Rustighi - 2020 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (3):274-301.
    Feminist scholars have long debated on a key contradiction in the political theory of Thomas Hobbes: While he sees women as free and equal to men in the state of nature, he postulates their subjection to male rule in the civil state without any apparent explanation. Focusing on Hobbes’s construction of the mother–child relationship, this article suggests that the subjugation of the mother to the father epitomizes the neutralization of the ancient principle of ‘governance’, which he replaces with a novel (...)
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  • Nietzsche: Bipolar Disorder and Creativity.Eva M. Cybulska - 2019 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 19 (1):51-63.
    This essay, the last in a series, focuses on the relationship between Nietzsche’s mental illness and his philosophical art. It is predicated upon my original diagnosis of his mental condition as bipolar affective disorder, which began in early adulthood and continued throughout his creative life. The kaleidoscopic mood shifts allowed him to see things from different perspectives and may have imbued his writings with passion rarely encountered in philosophical texts. At times hovering on the verge of psychosis, Nietzsche was able (...)
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  • Were Nietzsche’s Cardinal Ideas – Delusions?Eva M. Cybulska - 2008 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (1):1-13.
    Nietzsche’s cardinal ideas - God is Dead, Übermensch and Eternal Return of the Same - are approached here from the perspective of psychiatric phenomenology rather than that of philosophy. A revised diagnosis of the philosopher’s mental illness as manic-depressive psychosis forms the premise for discussion. Nietzsche conceived the above thoughts in close proximity to his first manic psychotic episode, in the summer of 1881, while staying in Sils-Maria (Swiss Alps). It was the anniversary of his father’s death, and also of (...)
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  • Reading Kristeva Through the Lens of Edusemiotics: Implications for Education.Inna Semetsky - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (10):1069-1081.
    There are two focal points to this article. One is to address Julia Kristeva’s theoretical corpus in the context of philosophy of education. Kristeva’s notion of subject in process problematises education with its habitual emphasis on ‘product’. Another is to consider her impact from the perspective of edusemiotics. Edusemiotics is a new direction in educational philosophy and theory, and Kristeva represents one contemporary French intellectual who implicitly inspired the creation, research and development of edusemiotics. The article will briefly address the (...)
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  • The Unpredictable Future of Fantasy's Traversal.Chris Coffman - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (4):43-61.
    Angelaki, Volume 18, Issue 4, Page 43-61, December 2013.
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  • Receptacle/ Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
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  • Freud's Oedipus and Kristeva's Narcissus: Three Heterogeneities.Sara Beardsworth - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):54-77.
    : The paper shows that three heterogeneities in Freud and Kristeva (unconscious/conscious, semiotic/symbolic, and imaginary/symbolic) expose the historical emergence, significance, and demise of psychic structures that present obstacles to our progressive political thinking. The oedipal and narcissistic structures of subjectivity represent the persistence of two past, bad forms of authority: paternal law and maternal authority. Contemporary psychoanalysis reveals a humankind going through the loss of this past in a process that opens up a different future of sexual difference in Western (...)
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  • Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning in Margaret's Museum and Legitimating Myths of Innocence in Casablanca.Tina Chanter - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):86 - 106.
    This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus becomes (...)
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  • The Powers of the False: Reading, Writing, Thinking Beyond Truth and Fiction.Doro Wiese - 2014 - Northwestern University Press.
    Can literature make it possible to represent histories that are otherwise ineffable? Making use of the Deleuzian concept of “the powers of the false,” Doro Wiese offers readings of three novels that deal with the Shoah, with colonialism, and with racialized identities. She argues that Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything Is Illuminated, Richard Flanagan’s Gould’s Book of Fish, and Richard Powers’s The Time of Our Singing are novels in which a space for unvoiced, silent, or silenced difference is created. Seen through (...)
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  • L’Écriture Limite: Kristeva's Postmodern Feminist Ethics.Dawne Mccance - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (2):141 - 160.
    In this essay, I trace the development of Julia Kristeva's theory and practice of "the subject in process/on trial" from her semiotic works of the 1960s to her psychoanalytic writings of the 1970s and 1980s. I read Kristeva's exploration of this "subject in process/on trial" as contributing to a postmodern feminist ethics.
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  • Container Technologies.Zoë Sofia - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):181-201.
    : This paper goes beyond critiques of western philosophical notions of space as passive, feminine, and unintelligent by reconfiguring containment as an (inter-)active process. The author draws on work in the history of technology, on a cybernetic epistemology that emphasizes the interdependence of organism and environment, and on intersubjectivist psychoanalytic theories of the maternal provision. A more unexpected ally is found in Heidegger, whose writings on holding and supply are read in ways that contribute to the development of an urgently (...)
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  • Conflicted Love.Kelly Oliver - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (3):1-18.
    : Our stereotypes of maternity and paternity as manifest in the history of philosophy and psychoanalysis interfere with the ability to imagine loving relationships. The associations of maternity with antisocial nature and paternity with disembodied cul-ture are inadequate to set up primary love relationships. Analyzing the conflicts in these associations, I reformulate the maternal body as social and lawful, and I re-formulate the paternal function as embodied, which enables imagining our primary relationships as loving.
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  • Homelessness or Symbolic Castration? Subjectivity, Language Acquisition, and Sociality in Julia Kristeva and Jacques Lacan.Bettina Schmitz & Translated By Julia Jansen - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (2):69-87.
    How much violence can a society expect its members to accept? A comparison between the language theories of Julia Kristeva and Jacques Lacan is the starting point for answering this question. A look at the early stages of language acquisition exposes the sacrificial logic of patriarchal society. Are those forces that restrict the individual to be conceived in a martial imagery of castration or is it possible that an existing society critically questions those points of socialization that leave their members (...)
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  • The White Creole in Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea : A Woman in Passage.Imen Mzoughi - 2016 - Human and Social Studies 5 (1):88-110.
    Studies on Jean Rhys have been fragmentary concentrating on one or two aspects of Rhys’s thematic concern with the alienation of the white creole without laying emphasis on Rhys’s exploration of the Creole’s identity. There has been no attempt to examine if the creole has to struggle harder and more than whites and blacks to come to terms with her personal identity until now. The answer is affirmative because the creole is a composite human being. Indeed, the white creole is (...)
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  • Holes of Oblivion: The Banality of Radical Evil.Peg Birmingham - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):80-103.
    : This essay offers a reflection on Arendt's notion of radical evil, arguing that her later understanding of the banality of evil is already at work in her earlier reflections on the nature of radical evil as banal, and furthermore, that Arendt's understanding of the "banality of radical evil" has its source in the very event that offers a possible remedy to it, namely, the event of natality. Kristeva's recent work (2001) on Arendt is important to this proposal insofar as (...)
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  • A Phenomenological Study of Sudanese Children's Experience of Seeking Refuge in North Africa.George Berguno & Nour Loutfy - 2009 - Schutzian Research. A Yearbook of Worldly Phenomenology and Qualitative Social Science 1:29-50.
    Forty-five children between the ages of nine and twelve years, who were forced to flee their native Sudan and seek refuge in Egypt, were interviewed about their everyday life in Cairo. Phenomenological analyses of the transcripts revealed the physical, social and technological dimensions to their encounter with a new cultural world. The interviews also revealed the extent to which the children had to face racism, discrimination and social exclusion. Specific analyses of children’s difficulties in learning a new form of Arabic (...)
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  • “The Lost Foundation”: Kristeva's Semiotic Chora and Its Ambiguous Legacy.Maria Margaroni - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):78-98.
    The aim of this essay is to reclaim Kristeva's concept of the semiotic chora by reinscribing it as an intervention in the context of two important postmodern debates. The first debate relates to the philosophical problem of "the beginning before the Beginning." The second concerns the necessity and possibility of mediation between incommensurable entities: the "demonic" and the social, desire and the Law, material production and representation. I contend: (1) that the introduction of the chora in RPL is part of (...)
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  • Receptacle/ Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
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  • Being-From-Others: Reading Heidegger After Cavarero.Lisa Guenther - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):99-118.
    : Drawing on Adriana Cavarero's account of natality, Guenther argues that Martin Heidegger overlooks the distinct ontological and ethical significance of birth as a limit that orients one toward an other who resists appropriation, even while handing down a heritage of possibilities that one can—and must—make one's own. Guenther calls this structure of natality Being-from-others, modifying Heidegger's language of inheritance to suggest an ethical understanding of existence as the gift of the other.
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