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Ontology and geographic objects: An empirical study of cognitive categorization

In C. Freksa & David M. Mark (eds.), Spatial Information Theory. Cognitive and Computational Foundations of Geographic Information Science (Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1661). pp. 283-298 (1999)

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  1. A Science of Topography: Bridging the Qualitative-Quantitative Divide.David M. Mark & Barry Smith - 2004 - In Geographic Information Science and Mountain Geomorphology. Chichester, England: Springer-Praxis. pp. 75--100.
    The shape of the Earth's surface, its topography, is a fundamental dimension of the environment, shaping or mediating many other environmental flows or functions. But there is a major divergence in the way that topography is conceptualized in different domains. Topographic cartographers, information scientists, geomorphologists and environmental modelers typically conceptualize topographic variability as a continuous field of elevations or as some discrete approximation to such a field. Pilots, explorers, anthropologists, ecologists, hikers, and archeologists, on the other hand, typically conceptualize this (...)
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  • Ontological Foundations for Geographic Information Science.David Mark, Barry Smith, Max Egenhofer & Stephen Hirtle - 2004 - In Robert McMaster & E. Lynn Usery (eds.), A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science. CRC Press. pp. 335-350.
    We propose as a UCGIS research priority the topic of “Ontological Foundations for Geographic Information.” Under this umbrella we unify several interrelated research subfields, each of which deals with different perspectives on geospatial ontologies and their roles in geographic information science. While each of these subfields could be addressed separately, we believe it is important to address ontological research in a unitary, systematic fashion, embracing conceptual issues concerning what would be required to establish an exhaustive ontology of the geospatial domain, (...)
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  • Ontology of Common Sense Geographic Phenomena: Foundations for Interoperable Multilingual Geospatial Databases.David M. Mark, Barry Smith & Berit Brogaard - 2000 - In 3rd AGILE Conference on Geographic Information Science. pp. 32-34.
    Information may be defined as the conceptual or communicable part of the content of mental acts. The content of mental acts includes sensory data as well as concepts, particular as well as general information. An information system is an external (non-mental) system designed to store such content. Information systems afford indirect transmission of content between people, some of whom may put information into the system and others who are among those who use the system. In order for communication to happen, (...)
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  • A Unified Framework for Building Ontological Theories with Application and Testing in the Field of Clinical Trials.Heller Barbara, Herre Heinrich & Barry Smith - 2001 - In IFOMIS Reports. Leipzig: University of Leipzig.
    The objective of this research programme is to contribute to the establishment of the emerging science of Formal Ontology in Information Systems via a collaborative project involving researchers from a range of disciplines including philosophy, logic, computer science, linguistics, and the medical sciences. The re­searchers will work together on the construction of a unified formal ontology, which means: a general framework for the construction of ontological theories in specific domains. The framework will be constructed using the axiomatic-deductive method of modern (...)
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  • Reexamining Fiat, Bona Fide and Force Dynamic Boundaries for Geopolitical Entities and Their Placement in DOLCE.Edward Heath Robinson - 2012 - Applied Ontology 7 (1):93-108.
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  • An Ontological Analysis of States: Organizations Vs. Legal Persons.Edward Heath Robinson - 2010 - Applied Ontology 5 (2):109-125.
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  • Do Mountains Exist? Towards an Ontology of Landforms.Barry Smith & David Mark - 2003 - Environment and Planning B (Planning and Design) 30 (3):411–427.
    Do mountains exist? The answer to this question is surely: yes. In fact, ‘mountain’ is the example of a kind of geographic feature or thing most commonly cited by English speakers (Mark, et al., 1999; Smith and Mark 2001), and this result may hold across many languages and cultures. But whether they are considered as individuals (tokens) or as kinds (types), mountains do not exist in quite the same unequivocal sense as do such prototypical everyday objects as chairs or people.
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