Switch to: References

Citations of:

Field's programme: some interference

Analysis 58 (2):63-71 (1998)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Towards a Fictionalist Philosophy of Mathematics.Robert Knowles - unknown
    In this thesis, I aim to motivate a particular philosophy of mathematics characterised by the following three claims. First, mathematical sentences are generally speaking false because mathematical objects do not exist. Second, people typically use mathematical sentences to communicate content that does not imply the existence of mathematical objects. Finally, in using mathematical language in this way, speakers are not doing anything out of the ordinary: they are performing straightforward assertions. In Part I, I argue that the role played by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Abstract Expressionism and the Communication Problem.David Liggins - 2014 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (3):599-620.
    Some philosophers have recently suggested that the reason mathematics is useful in science is that it expands our expressive capacities. Of these philosophers, only Stephen Yablo has put forward a detailed account of how mathematics brings this advantage. In this article, I set out Yablo’s view and argue that it is implausible. Then, I introduce a simpler account and show it is a serious rival to Yablo’s. 1 Introduction2 Yablo’s Expressionism3 Psychological Objections to Yablo’s Expressionism4 Introducing Belief Expressionism5 Objections and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • How Not to Enhance the Indispensability Argument.Russell Marcus - 2014 - Philosophia Mathematica 22 (3):345-360.
    The new explanatory or enhanced indispensability argument alleges that our mathematical beliefs are justified by their indispensable appearances in scientific explanations. This argument differs from the standard indispensability argument which focuses on the uses of mathematics in scientific theories. I argue that the new argument depends for its plausibility on an equivocation between two senses of explanation. On one sense the new argument is an oblique restatement of the standard argument. On the other sense, it is vulnerable to an instrumentalist (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Extending Hartry Field's Instrumental Account of Applied Mathematics to Statistical Mechanics.Glen Meyer - 2009 - Philosophia Mathematica 17 (3):273-312.
    A serious flaw in Hartry Field’s instrumental account of applied mathematics, namely that Field must overestimate the extent to which many of the structures of our mathematical theories are reflected in the physical world, underlies much of the criticism of this account. After reviewing some of this criticism, I illustrate through an examination of the prospects for extending Field’s account to classical equilibrium statistical mechanics how this flaw will prevent any significant extension of this account beyond field theories. I note (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Weaseling Away the Indispensability Argument.J. Melia - 2000 - Mind 109 (435):455-480.
    According to the indispensability argument, the fact that we quantify over numbers, sets and functions in our best scientific theories gives us reason for believing that such objects exist. I examine a strategy to dispense with such quantification by simply replacing any given platonistic theory by the set of sentences in the nominalist vocabulary it logically entails. I argue that, as a strategy, this response fails: for there is no guarantee that the nominalist world that go beyond the set of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   131 citations  
  • Fundamental Properties of Fundamental Properties.M. Eddon - 2013 - In Karen Bennett Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, Volume 8. pp. 78-104.
    Since the publication of David Lewis's ''New Work for a Theory of Universals,'' the distinction between properties that are fundamental – or perfectly natural – and those that are not has become a staple of mainstream metaphysics. Plausible candidates for perfect naturalness include the quantitative properties posited by fundamental physics. This paper argues for two claims: (1) the most satisfying account of quantitative properties employs higher-order relations, and (2) these relations must be perfectly natural, for otherwise the perfectly natural properties (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • On Being Twice as Heavy.David Liggins - 2003 - Philosophia Mathematica 11 (2):203-7.
    This note considers a recent challenge to Field's nominalization programme due to Joseph Melia, who argues that Field's treatment of mass involves unacceptable ontological extravagance. I explain how Field can get around the difficulty by adding a new operator to his language. This tactic appears to threaten Field's argument against relationism about space; I argue, however, that this is not a genuine problem.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Are Shapes Intrinsic?Bradford Skow - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 133 (1):111 - 130.
    It is widely believed that shapes are intrinsic properties. But this claim is hard to defend. I survey all known theories of shape properties, and argue that each theory is either incompatible with the claim that shapes are intrinsic, or can be shown to be false.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  • Once Upon a Spacetime.Bradford Skow - manuscript
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Can the Constructive Empiricist Be a Nominalist? Quasi-Truth, Commitment and Consistency.Paul Dicken - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (2):191-209.
    In this paper, I explore Rosen’s ‘transcendental’ objection to constructive empiricism—the argument that in order to be a constructive empiricist, one must be ontologically committed to just the sort of abstract, mathematical objects constructive empiricism seems committed to denying. In particular, I assess Bueno’s ‘partial structures’ response to Rosen, and argue that such a strategy cannot succeed, on the grounds that it cannot provide an adequate metalogic for our scientific discourse. I conclude by arguing that this result provides some interesting (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations