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  1. Moral and Fictional Discourses on Assisted Reproductive Technologies: Current Responses, Future Scenarios.Maurizio Balistreri & Solveig Lena Hansen - 2019 - NanoEthics 13 (3):199-207.
    This paper gives an introduction to the interdisciplinary special section. Against the historical and ethical background of reproductive technologies, it explores future scenarios of human reproduction and analyzes ways of mutual engagement between fictional and academic endeavors. The underlying idea is that we can make use of human reproduction scenarios in at least two ways: we can use them to critique technologies by imagining terrible consequences for humanity but also to defend positions that favor scientific and technological development.
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  • Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy and Parenthood.Mirko Daniel Garasic & Daniel Sperling - 2015 - Global Bioethics 26 (3-4):198-205.
    The year 2015 has been a decisive year for the future of mitochondrial replacement therapy – at least in the Western world. Currently, the UK and the US governments are undergoing a process of ethical and scientific evaluation of the technique to decide whether to allow its implementation or not. MRT requires the fusion of the DNA of three parents into an embryo – and this creates a number of worries as to what this scientific innovation will lead to. These (...)
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  • Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques: Egg Donation, Genealogy and Eugenics.César Palacios-González - 2016 - Monash Bioethics Review 34 (1):37-51.
    Several objections against the morality of researching or employing mitochondrial replacement techniques have been advanced recently. In this paper, I examine three of these objections and show that they are found wanting. First I examine whether mitochondrial replacement techniques, research and clinical practice, should not be carried out because of possible harms to egg donors. Next I assess whether mitochondrial replacement techniques should be banned because they could affect the study of genealogical ancestry. Finally, I examine the claim that mitochondrial (...)
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  • How Many Parents Should There Be in a Family?Kalle Grill - 2019 - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    In this article, I challenge the widespread presumption that a child should have exactly two parents. I consider the pros and cons of various numbers of parents for the people most directly affected – the children themselves and their parents. The number of parents, as well as the ratio of parents to children, may have an impact on what resources are available, what relationships can develop between parents and children, what level of conflict can be expected in the family, as (...)
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  • Lesbian Motherhood and Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques: Reproductive Freedom and Genetic Kinship.Giulia Cavaliere & César Palacios-González - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):835-842.
    In this paper, we argue that lesbian couples who wish to have children who are genetically related to both of them should be allowed access to mitochondrial replacement techniques. First, we provide a brief explanation of mitochondrial diseases and MRTs. We then present the reasons why MRTs are not, by nature, therapeutic. The upshot of the view that MRTs are non-therapeutic techniques is that their therapeutic potential cannot be invoked for restricting their use only to those cases where a mitochondrial (...)
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  • Resource Allocation, Treatment, Disclosure, and Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques.César Palacios-gonzález - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (2):278-287.
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  • “I Am Your Mother and Your Father!” In Vitro Derived Gametes and the Ethics of Solo Reproduction.Daniela Cutas & Anna Smajdor - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (4):354-369.
    In this paper, we will discuss the prospect of human reproduction achieved with gametes originating from only one person. According to statements by a minority of scientists working on the generation of gametes in vitro, it may become possible to create eggs from men’s non-reproductive cells and sperm from women’s. This would enable, at least in principle, the creation of an embryo from cells obtained from only one individual: ‘solo reproduction’. We will consider what might motivate people to reproduce in (...)
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  • Germline Modification and the Burden of Human Existence.John Harris - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):6-18.
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  • Using Stem Cell-Derived Gametes for Same-Sex Reproduction: An Alternative Scenario.Seppe Segers, Heidi Mertes, Guido Pennings, Guido de Wert & Wybo Dondorp - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (10):688-691.
    It has been suggested that future application of stem-cell derived gametes might lead to the possibility for same-sex couples to have genetically related children. Still, for this to become possible, the technique of gamete derivation and techniques of reprogramming somatic cells to a pluripotent state would have to be perfected. Moreover, egg cells would have to be derived from male cells and sperm cells from female cells, which is believed to be particularly difficult, if not impossible. We suggest a more (...)
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