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  1. Exploitation and International Clinical Research: The Disconnect Between Goals and Policy.Danielle M. Wenner - 2018 - In David Boonin (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag. pp. 563-574.
    A growing proportion of clinical research funded by pharmaceutical companies, high-income country research agencies, and not-for-profit funders is conducted in low- and middle-income settings. Disparities in wealth and access to healthcare between the populations where new interventions are often tested and those where many of them are ultimately marketed raise concerns about exploitation. This chapter examines several ethical requirements frequently advanced as mechanisms for protecting research subjects in underserved communities from exploitation and evaluates the effectiveness of those mechanisms as responses (...)
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  • Family-Based Consent to Organ Transplantation: A Cross-Cultural Exploration.Mark J. Cherry, Ruiping Fan & Kelly Kate Evans - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):521-533.
    This special thematic issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy brings together a cross-cultural set of scholars from Asia, Europe, and North America critically to explore foundational questions of familial authority and the implications of such findings for organ procurement policies designed to increase access to transplantation. The substantial disparity between the available supply of human organs and demand for organ transplantation creates significant pressure to manipulate public policy to increase organ procurement. As the articles in this issue explore, (...)
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  • Moving Beyond Mismatch.Robin Dembroff - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):60-63.
    In this peer commentary on Maura Priest's "Transgender Children and the Right to Transition: Medical Ethics When Parents Mean Well but Cause Harm", I argue against the "mismatch" model of trans identity. On this model, which is prevalent in institutional and medical contexts, to be trans is to have one's gender identity "mismatch" with one's sexed body.
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  • “The Edge of Harm and Help”: Ethical Considerations in the Care of Transgender Youth with Complex Family Situations.Beth A. Clark, Alice Virani & Elizabeth M. Saewyc - 2020 - Ethics and Behavior 30 (3):161-180.
    Health-care providers frequently face clinical ethical dilemmas when working with transgender youth who require hormone therapy but lack parental support for this intervention. Through semi-structured interviews and grounded theory analysis, we explored ethical and clinical decision-making processes of health-care providers, as well as the health care experiences of trans youth with family discordance. We analyzed responses in relation to North American bioethics principles, best interests standard, and the harm principle, exploring issues of autonomy, evidence, and anti-trans bias. We propose an (...)
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  • Should Lack of Family Social Support Be a Contraindication to Pediatric Transplant?Bethany J. Foster & Aviva M. Goldberg - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):37-39.
    Volume 19, Issue 11, November 2019, Page 37-39.
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  • Social Support Is Not the Only Problematic Criterion, But If Used at All, “Lack of Social Support” Should Count in Favor of Listing, Not Against.Maura Priest - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):35-37.
    Berry, Daniels, and Ladin make a strong argument for discontinuing the use of, “lack of social support,” as an organ transplantation listing criterion. This argument, however, actually leads to conclusions much stronger than those that the authors’ propose: The argument works equally well against using, (1) any “psychosocial” factors at all as a listing criterion, and, (2) any criteria other than factors that directly relate to empirically established medical need, and/or empirically established survival rate. Moreover, while the authors rightly point (...)
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  • Resisting the Post-Truth Era: Maintaining a Commitment to Science and Social Justice in Bioethics.Johanna Olson-Kennedy, Diane Ehrensaft, Alice Virani & Beth A. Clark - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (7):W1-W3.
    Volume 19, Issue 7, July 2019, Page W1-W3.
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  • Watchful Waiting Doesn’T Mean No Puberty Blockers, and Moving Beyond Watchful Waiting.Florence Ashley - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (6):W3-W4.
    Volume 19, Issue 6, June 2019, Page W3-W4.
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  • Puberty Blockers Are Necessary, but They Don’T Prevent Homelessness: Caring for Transgender Youth by Supporting Unsupportive Parents.Florence Ashley - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):87-89.
    Volume 19, Issue 6, June 2019, Page W3-W4.
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  • A Two-Pronged Approach to Minimizing Harms for Transgender Youth: Medical Interventions and Social Interventions.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):85-87.
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  • Transgender Children, Puberty Blockers, and the Law: Solutions to the Problem of Dissenting Parents.Doriane Lambelet Coleman - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):82-84.
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  • Puberty-Blocking Treatment and the Rights of Bad Candidates.B. R. George & Danielle M. Wenner - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):80-82.
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  • Identification Before Prescription: Necessary Changes for the Support of Transgender Youth.Elizabeth R. Boskey & Jonathan M. Marron - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):78-80.
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  • The Right to Best Care for Children Does Not Include the Right to Medical Transition.Michael Laidlaw, Michelle Cretella & Kevin Donovan - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):75-77.
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  • Psychological Maltreatment and Medical Neglect of Transgender Adolescents: The Need for Recognition and Individualized Assessment.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, Robert A. Shapiro & Lee Ann E. Conard - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):72-74.
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  • Should Parental Refusal of Puberty-Blocking Treatment Be Overridden? The Role of the Harm Principle.Lauren Notini, Rosalind McDougall & Ken C. Pang - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):69-72.
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  • Decision Making and the Long-Term Impact of Puberty Blockade in Transgender Children.Rebecca M. Harris, Amy C. Tishelman, Gwendolyn P. Quinn & Leena Nahata - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):67-69.
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  • The Social Context of Adolescents’ Right to Transition.Joshua Franklin - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):65-66.
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  • True Autonomy/False Dichotomies? Genderqueer Kids and the Myth of the Quick Fix.Lauren L. Baker - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (2):63-65.
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