Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Computers Are Syntax All the Way Down: Reply to Bozşahin.William J. Rapaport - 2019 - Minds and Machines 29 (2):227-237.
    A response to a recent critique by Cem Bozşahin of the theory of syntactic semantics as it applies to Helen Keller, and some applications of the theory to the philosophy of computer science.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Yes, She Was!: Reply to Ford’s “Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room”.William J. Rapaport - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (1):3-17.
    Ford’s Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room claims that my argument in How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape from a Chinese Room fails because Searle and I use the terms ‘syntax’ and ‘semantics’ differently, hence are at cross purposes. Ford has misunderstood me; this reply clarifies my theory.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • In Defense of Contextual Vocabulary Acquisition: How to Do Things with Words in Context.William J. Rapaport - 2005 - In Anind Dey, Boicho Kokinov, David Leake & Roy Turner (eds.), Proceedings of the 5th International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Modeling and Using Context. Springer-Verlag Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence 3554. pp. 396--409.
    Contextual vocabulary acquisition (CVA) is the deliberate acquisition of a meaning for a word in a text by reasoning from context, where “context” includes: (1) the reader’s “internalization” of the surrounding text, i.e., the reader’s “mental model” of the word’s “textual context” (hereafter, “co-text” [3]) integrated with (2) the reader’s prior knowledge (PK), but it excludes (3) external sources such as dictionaries or people. CVA is what you do when you come across an unfamiliar word in your reading, realize that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room.William J. Rapaport - 2006 - Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the SNePS computational knowledge-representation system, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Abductive Reasoning, Interpretation and Collaborative Processes.Claudia Arrighi & Roberta Ferrario - 2008 - Foundations of Science 13 (1):75-87.
    In this paper we want to examine how the mutual understanding of speakers is reached during a conversation through collaborative processes, and what role is played by abductive inference (in the Peircean sense) in these processes. We do this by bringing together contributions coming from a variety of disciplines, such as logic, philosophy of language and psychology. When speakers are engaged in a conversation, they refer to a supposed common ground: every participant ascribes to the others some knowledge, belief, opinion (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Revisiting Human-Agent Communication: The Importance of Joint Co-Construction and Understanding Mental States.Stefan Kopp & Nicole Krämer - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The study of human-human communication and the development of computational models for human-agent communication have diverged significantly throughout the last decade. Yet, despite frequently made claims of “super-human performance” in, e.g., speech recognition or image processing, so far, no system is able to lead a half-decent coherent conversation with a human. In this paper, we argue that we must start to re-consider the hallmarks of cooperative communication and the core capabilities that we have developed for it, and which conversational agents (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Syntax, Semantics, and Computer Programs.William J. Rapaport - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (2):309-321.
    Turner argues that computer programs must have purposes, that implementation is not a kind of semantics, and that computers might need to understand what they do. I respectfully disagree: Computer programs need not have purposes, implementation is a kind of semantic interpretation, and neither human computers nor computing machines need to understand what they do.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Philosophy of Computer Science.Raymond Turner - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Meinongian Semantics and Artificial Intelligence.William J. Rapaport - 2013 - Humana Mente 6 (25):25-52.
    This essay describes computational semantic networks for a philosophical audience and surveys several approaches to semantic-network semantics. In particular, propositional semantic networks are discussed; it is argued that only a fully intensional, Meinongian semantics is appropriate for them; and several Meinongian systems are presented.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Dynamic Nature of Meaning.Claudia Arrighi & Roberta Ferrario - 2005 - In Lorenzo Magnani & Riccardo Dossena (eds.), Computing, Philosophy and Cognition. College Publications. pp. 295-312.
    In this paper we investigate how the dynamic nature of words’ meanings plays a role in a philosophical theory of meaning. For ‘dynamic nature’ we intend the characteristic of being flexible, of changing according to many factors (speakers, contexts, and more). We consider meaning as something that gradually takes shape from the dynamic processes of communication. Accordingly, we present a draft of a theory of meaning that, on the one hand, describes how a private meaning is formed as a mental (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Dialogue as Habit-Taking in Peirce’s Continuum: The Call to Absolute Chance.Donna E. West - 2015 - Dialogue 54 (4):685-702.
    In this inquiry, I testify to the central place of signs in Peirce’s cosmology, and to the power of entertaining novel propositions through dialogue to foster the unity necessary to weld members of his continuum. Peirce’s concept of dialogue becomes the conduit to weld each member of the continuum. Peirce’s primary mover in bringing about this ‘welding’ is chance/habit in sign use itself. Although the self’s place as an expression of all components of the physical world will be addressed, primary (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Social Externalism and the Problem of Communication.Joey Pollock - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (12):3229-3251.
    Social externalism must allow that subjects can misunderstand the content of their own thoughts. I argue that we can exploit this commitment to create a dilemma for the view’s account of communication. To arrive at the first horn of the dilemma, I argue that, on social externalism, it is understanding which is the measure of communicative success. This would be a highly revisionary account of communication. The only way that the social externalist can salvage the claim that mental content is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations