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  1. Well-Being, Opportunity, and Selecting for Disability.Andrew Schroeder - 2018 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 14 (1).
    In this paper I look at the much-discussed case of disabled parents seeking to conceive disabled children. I argue that the permissibility of selecting for disability does not depend on the precise impact the disability will have on the child’s wellbeing. I then turn to an alternative analysis, which argues that the permissibility of selecting for disability depends on the impact that disability will have on the child’s future opportunities. Nearly all bioethicists who have approached the issue in this way (...)
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  • A Feminist Contestation of Ableist Assumptions: Implications for Biomedical Ethics, Disability Theory, and Phenomenology.Christine Marie Wieseler - unknown
    This dissertation contributes to the development of philosophy of disability by drawing on disability studies, feminist philosophy, phenomenology, and philosophy of biology in order to contest epistemic and ontological assumptions about disability within biomedical ethics as well as within philosophical work on the body, demonstrating how philosophical inquiry is radically transformed when experiences of disability are taken seriously. In the first two chapters, I focus on epistemological and ontological concerns surrounding disability within biomedical ethics. Although disabled people and their advocates (...)
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  • Missing Phenomenological Accounts: Disability Theory, Body Integrity Identity Disorder, and Being an Amputee.Christine Wieseler - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):83-111.
    Historically, frameworks impoverished by the omission of disabled people's own standpoints have supported systems and practices that patronize and thereby further oppress disabled people, even while intended to serve their supposed good.Philosophers and psychologists often omit disabled people's concerns and experiences, even when disabled people are in a position of epistemic privilege in regard to the topic under consideration. While numerous recent empirical studies do include the reports of disabled people—regarding their quality of life, for example—there is still much that (...)
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  • Pain, Chronic Pain, and Sickle Cell Chronic Pain.Ron Amundson - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (4):14 - 16.
    (2013). Pain, Chronic Pain, and Sickle Cell Chronic Pain. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 14-16. doi: 10.1080/15265161.2013.768859.
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  • What’s Wrong with “You Say You’Re Happy, but…” Reasoning?Jason Marsh - forthcoming - In David Wasserman & Adam Cureton (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Disability. Oxford University Press.
    Disability-positive philosophers often note a troubling tendency to dismiss what disabled people say about their well-being. This chapter seeks to get clearer on why this tendency might be troubling. It argues that recent appeals to lived experience, testimonial injustice, and certain challenges to adaptive-preference reasoning do not fully explain what is wrong with questioning the happiness of disabled people. It then argues that common attempts to debunk the claim that disabled people are happy are worrisome because they threaten everyone’s well-being (...)
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  • Objectivity as Neutrality, Nondisabled Ignorance, and Strong Objectivity in Biomedical Ethics.Christine Wieseler - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:85-106.
    This paper focuses on epistemic practices within biomedical ethics that are related to disability. These practices are one of the reasons that there is tension between biomedical ethicists and disability advocates. I argue that appeals to conceptual neutrality regarding disability, which Anita Silvers recommends, are counterproductive. Objectivity as neutrality serves to obscure the social values and interests that inform epistemic practices. Drawing on feminist standpoint theory and epistemologies of ignorance, I examine ways that appeals to objectivity as neutrality serve to (...)
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  • Disability, Depression, Diagnosis, and Harm: Reflections on Two Personal Scenarios.G. Thomas Couser - 2019 - Journal of Medical Humanities 40 (2):239-251.
    In this article I draw on two scenarios from my personal life—the diagnosis of my newborn grandnephew with CHARGE syndrome and the diagnosis of my father with depression—to reflect on whether and when diagnosis may be harmful to patients. Despite the great differences between the two scenarios, I argue that in both cases the tendency of diagnosis to generalize, categorize, and stigmatize can lead to insidious and counterproductive effects. The perspective of disability studies can help physicians to anticipate, minimize or (...)
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  • Termination of Pregnancy After NonInvasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT): Ethical Considerations.Tom Shakespeare & Richard Hull - 2018 - Journal of Practical Ethics 6 (2):32-54.
    This article explores the Nuffield Council on Bioethics’ recent report about non-invasive prenatal testing. Given that such testing is likely to become the norm, it is important to question whether there should be some ethical parameters regarding its use. The article engages with the viewpoints of Jeff McMahan, Julian Savulescu, Stephen Wilkinson and other commentators on prenatal ethics. The authors argue that there are a variety of moral considerations that legitimately play a significant role with regard to (prospective) parental decision-making (...)
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  • Acknowledging Levels of Racism in the Definition of “Difficult”.Melissa Creary & Arri Eisen - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (4):16 - 18.
    (2013). Acknowledging Levels of Racism in the Definition of “Difficult”. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 16-18. doi: 10.1080/15265161.2013.767964.
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  • Just What Is the Disability Perspective on Disability?Tom Shakespeare - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (3):31-32.
    In the helpful article “Why Bioethics Needs a Disability Moral Psychology,” Joseph Stramondo adds to the critique of actually existing bioethics and explains why disability activists and scholars so often find fault with the arguments of bioethicists. He is careful not to stereotype either community—rightly, given that bioethicists endorse positions as disparate as utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics, and feminist ethics, among others. Although Stramondo never explicitly mentions utilitarians or liberals, it seems probable that these are the main targets of his (...)
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  • A Fate Worse Than Death? The Well-Being of Patients Diagnosed as Vegetative With Covert Awareness.Mackenzie Graham - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (5):1005-1020.
    Patients in the vegetative state are wholly unaware of themselves, or their surroundings. However, a minority of patients diagnosed as vegetative are actually aware. What is the well-being of these patients? How are their lives going, for them? It has been argued that on a reasonable conception of well-being, these patients are faring so poorly that it may be in their best interests not to continue existing. I argue against this claim. Standard conceptions of well-being do not clearly support the (...)
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