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  1. The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works: An Essay in the Philosophy of Music.Edward Lippman - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (4):630-632.
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  • Authenticities: Philosophical Reflections on Musical Performance.Günter Zöller - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (4):638.
    Kivy distinguishes between three different claims to authenticity in the historical performance movement: authenticity with respect to the composer’s intention, authenticity with regard to sound, and authenticity in matters of performance practice. To this, Kivy adds a fourth notion of authenticity that does not figure in the idealized self-description of the historical performance movement but rather points to an alternative kind of authenticity championed by Kivy himself: the authenticity that a performance might have due to the sincerity of the artist (...)
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  • Universals and Scientific Realism: A Theory of Universals.D. M. Armstrong - 1978 - Cambridge University Press.
    v. 1. Nominalism and realism.--v. 2. A theory of universals.
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  • Essence and Modality.Kit Fine - 1994 - Philosophical Perspectives 8 (Logic and Language):1-16.
    It is my aim in this paper to show that the contemporary assimilation of essence to modality is fundamentally misguided and that, as a consequence, the corresponding conception of metaphysics should be given up. It is not my view that the modal account fails to capture anything which might reasonably be called a concept of essence. My point, rather, is that the notion of essence which is of central importance to the metaphysics of identity is not to be understood in (...)
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  • What Are Groups?Katherine Ritchie - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 166 (2):257-272.
    In this paper I argue for a view of groups, things like teams, committees, clubs and courts. I begin by examining features all groups seem to share. I formulate a list of six features of groups that serve as criteria any adequate theory of groups must capture. Next, I examine four of the most prominent views of groups currently on offer—that groups are non-singular pluralities, fusions, aggregates and sets. I argue that each fails to capture one or more of the (...)
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  • Constitution and Similarity.Kathrin Koslicki - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 117 (3):327-363.
    Whenever an object constitutes, makes up or composes another object, the objects in question share a striking number of properties. This paper is addressed to the question of what might account for the intimate relation and striking similarity between constitutionally related objects. According to my account, the similarities between constitutionally related objects are captured at least in part by means of a principle akin to that of strong supervenience. My paper addresses two main issues. First, I propose independently plausible principles (...)
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  • A Return to Musical Idealism.Wesley D. Cray & Carl Matheson - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (4):702-715.
    In disputes about the ontology of music, musical idealism—that is, the view that musical compositions are ideas—has proven to be rather unpopular. We argue that, once we have a better grip on the ontology of ideas, we can formulate a version of musical idealism that is not only defensible, but plausible and attractive. We conclude that compositions are a particular kind of idea: they are completed ideas for musical manifestation.
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  • Against Maxcon Simples.Kris McDaniel - 2003 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):265 – 275.
    In a recent paper titled ' Simples ', Ned Markosian asks and answers the Simple Question, which is, 'under what circumstances is it true of some object that it has no proper parts?' Markosian 's answer to the simple question is MaxCon, which states that an object is a simple if and only if it is a maximally continuous object. I present several arguments against MaxCon.
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  • Rhythm and Noise an Aesthetics of Rock.Theodore Gracyk - 1996 - I.B. Tauris.
    Analyzes rock music as an art form in the liberal tradition.
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  • Art: What It Is and Why It Matters.Catharine Abell - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (3):671-691.
    In this paper, I provide a descriptive definition of art that is able to accommodate the existence of bad art, while illuminating the value of good art. This, I argue, is something that existing definitions of art fail to do. I approach this task by providing an account according to which what makes something an artwork is the institutional process by which it is made. I argue that Searle’s account of institutions and institutional facts shows that the existence of all (...)
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  • Art as Performance.Dave Davies - 2003 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this richly argued and provocative book, David Davies elaborates and defends a broad conceptual framework for thinking about the arts that reveals important continuities and discontinuities between traditional and modern art, and between different artistic disciplines. Elaborates and defends a broad conceptual framework for thinking about the arts. Offers a provocative view about the kinds of things that artworks are and how they are to be understood. Reveals important continuities and discontinuities between traditional and modern art. Highlights core topics (...)
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  • Making Objects and Events: A Hylomorphic Theory of Artifacts, Actions, and Organisms.Simon J. Evnine - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Simon J. Evnine explores the view that some objects have matter from which they are distinct but that this distinctness is not due to the existence of anything like a form. He draws on Aristotle's insight that such objects must be understood in terms of an account that links what they are essentially with how they come to exist and what their functions are. Artifacts are the most prominent kind of objects where these three features coincide, and Evnine develops a (...)
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  • Musical Performance: A Philosophical Study.Stan Godlovitch - 1998 - Routledge.
    Most music we hear comes to us via a recording medium on which sound has been stored. Such remoteness of music heard from music made has become so commonplace it is rarely considered. _Musical Performance: A Philosophical Study_ considers the implications of this separation for live musical performance and music-making. Rather than examining the composition or perception of music as most philosophical accounts of music do, Stan Godlovitch takes up the problem of how the tradition of active music playing and (...)
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  • The Statue and the Clay.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1998 - Noûs 32 (2):149-173.
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  • Critical Study Julian Dodd. Works of Music: An Essay in Ontology. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007).Gary Ostertag - 2012 - Noûs 46 (2):355-374.
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  • Negative Properties.Nick Zangwill - 2011 - Noûs 45 (3):528-556.
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  • Extrinsic Properties.David Lewis - 1983 - Philosophical Studies 44 (2):197-200.
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  • Fiction and Metaphysics.Amie L. Thomasson - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This challenging study places fiction squarely at the centre of the discussion of metaphysics. Philosophers have traditionally treated fiction as involving a set of narrow problems in logic or the philosophy of language. By contrast Amie Thomasson argues that fiction has far-reaching implications for central problems of metaphysics. The book develops an 'artifactual' theory of fiction, whereby fictional characters are abstract artifacts as ordinary as laws or symphonies or works of literature. By understanding fictional characters we come to understand how (...)
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  • Authenticities: Philosophical Reflections on Musical Performance.Peter Kivy - 1995 - Cornell University Press.
    "In his latest book on the aesthetics of music, Peter Kivy presents an argument not for authenticity but for authenticities of performance, including ...
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  • The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works: An Essay in the Philosophy of Music.Lydia Goehr - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    What is the difference between a performance of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and the symphony itself? What does it mean for musicians to be faithful to the works they perform? To answer this question, Goehr combines philosophical and historical methods of enquiry. She describes how the concept of a musical work emerged as late as 1800, and how it subsequently defined the norms, expectations, and behavior characteristic of classical musical practice. Out of the historical thesis, Goehr draws philosophical conclusions about the (...)
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  • Musical Performance: A Philosophical Study.Stanley Godlovitch - 1998 - Routledge.
    This book evaluates traditional musical performance and asks where its unique value lies.
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  • Works of Music: An Essay in Ontology.Julian Dodd - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- The type/token theory introduced -- Motivating the type/token theory : repeatability -- Nominalist approaches to the ontology of music -- Musical anti-realism -- The type/token theory elaborated -- Types I : abstract, unstructured, unchanging -- Types introduced and nominalism repelled -- Types as abstracta -- Types as unstructured entities -- Types as fixed and unchanging -- Types II : platonism -- Introduction : eternal existence and timelessness -- Types and properties -- The eternal existence of properties reconsidered -- (...)
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  • Art and the Aesthetic: An Institutional Analysis.George Dickie - 1974 - Cornell University Press.
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  • Musical Works and Performances: A Philosophical Exploration.Stephen Davies - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    What are musical works? Are they discovered or created? Can recordings substitute faithfully for live performances? This book considers these and other intriguing questions. It first outlines the nature of musical works, their relation to performances, and their notational specification; it then considers authenticity in performance, musical traditions, and recordings. Comprehensive and original, the volume discusses many kinds of music, applying its conclusions to issues as diverse as the authentic performance movement, the cultural integrity of ethnic music, and the implications (...)
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  • An Ontology of Art.Gregory Currie - 1989 - St. Martin's Press.
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  • The Property Theory of Musical Works.Philip Letts - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (1):57-69.
    The property theory of musical works says that each musical work is a property that is instantiated by its occurrences, that is, the work's performances and playings. The property theory provides ontological explanations very similar to those given by its popular cousin, the type/token theory of musical works, but it is both simpler and stronger. However, type/token theorists often dismiss the property theory. In this essay, I formulate a version of the property theory that identifies each type with a unique (...)
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  • Words.David Kaplan - 1990 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 64 (1):93-119.
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  • Art as Performance.David Davies - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (221):694-696.
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  • Indication, Abstraction, and Individuation.Jerrold Levinson - 2013 - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art and Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press. pp. 49.
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  • Platonism Vs. Nominalism in Contemporary Musical Ontology.Andrew Kania - 2013 - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art and Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press. pp. 197.
    In this essay I first outline contemporary Platonism about musical works – the theory that musical works are abstract objects. I then consider reasons to be suspicious of such a view, motivating a consideration of nominalist theories of musical works. I argue for two conclusions: first, that there are no compelling reasons to be a nominalist about musical works in particular, i.e. that nominalism about musical works rests on arguments for thoroughgoing nominalism, and, second, that if Platonism fails, fictionalism about (...)
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  • Repeatable Artwork Sentences and Generics.Shieva Kleinschmidt & Jacob Ross - 2013 - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art and Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press. pp. 125.
    We seem to talk about repeatable artworks, like symphonies, films, and novels, all the time. We say things like, "The Moonlight Sonata has three movements" and "Duck Soup makes me laugh". How are these sentences to be understood? We argue against the simple subject/predicate view, on which the subjects of the sentences refer to individuals and the sentences are true iff the referents of the subjects have the properties picked out by the predicates. We then consider two alternative responses that (...)
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  • Tape Composition: An Art Form in Search of its Metaphysics.Linda Ferguson - 1983 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (1):17-27.
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  • An Ontology of Art.Nicholas Wolterstorff - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (1):79-81.
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  • The Transfiguration of the Commonplace.Arthur C. Danto - 1974 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (2):139-148.
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  • Rhythm and Noise: An Aesthetics of Rock.John Fisher - 1999 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (4):467-469.
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  • Every Performance Is a Stage: Musical Stage Theory as a Novel Account for the Ontology of Musical Works.Caterina Moruzzi - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (3):341-351.
    This paper defends Musical Stage Theory as a novel account of the ontology of musical works. Its main claim is that a musical work is a performance. The significance of this argument is twofold. First, it demonstrates the availability of an alternative, and ontologically tenable, view to well-established positions in the current debate on musical metaphysics. Second, it shows how the revisionary approach of Musical Stage Theory actually provides a better account of the ontological status of musical works.
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  • Excess in Art: The Case of Oversinging.Jeanette Bicknell - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (1):83-92.
    “Oversinging” is singing that is excessive in one or more dimensions: too loud, too ornamented, too melismatic, too expressive, or employing too much vibrato. I begin with a characterization of oversinging and establish a context for discussion. Next I consider performances by Christina Aguilera and Michael Bolton as examples. In light of these examples, I consider how oversinging might be both aesthetically and morally problematic. Along the way I raise concerns about authenticity and sincerity. Finally, I consider a “paradox” of (...)
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  • All Play and No Work: An Ontology of Jazz.Andrew Kania - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):391-403.
    I argue for an ontology of jazz according to which it is a tradition of musical performances but no works of art. I proceed by rejecting three alternative proposals: (i) that jazz is a work performance tradition, (ii) that jazz performances are works of art in themselves, and (iii) that jazz recordings are works of art. I also note that the concept of a work of art involved (1) is nonevaluative, so to deny jazz works of art is not to (...)
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  • Talk About Music: From Wolterstorffian Ambiguity to Generics.Stefano Predelli - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (3):273-283.
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  • Making Tracks: The Ontology of Rock Music.Andrew Kania - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):401–414.
    I argue that the work of art in rock music is a track constructed in the studio, that tracks usually manifest songs, which can be performed live, and that a cover version is a track (successfully) intended to manifest the same song as some other track. This ontology reflects the way informed audiences talk about rock. It recognizes not only the centrality of recorded tracks to the tradition, as discussed by Theodore Gracyk, but also the value accorded to live performance (...)
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  • The Artist's Sanction in Contemporary Art.Sherri Irvin - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (4):315–326.
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  • Musical Materialism and the Inheritance Problem.Chris Tillman & J. Spencer - 2012 - Analysis 72 (2):252-259.
    Some hold that musical works are fusions of, or coincide with, their performances. But if performances contain wrong notes, won't works inherit that property? We say ‘no’.
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  • The Transfiguration of the Commonplace.Warren Quinn & Arthur C. Danto - 1983 - Philosophical Review 92 (3):481.
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  • Art and the Aesthetic: A N Institutional Analysis.Kendall L. Walton - 1977 - Philosophical Review 86 (1):97.
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  • Art as Performance. [REVIEW]A. Kania - 2005 - Mind 114 (453):137-141.
    A review of David Davies, _Art as Performance_ (Blackwell, 2004).
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  • Essence and Intrinsicality.David Denby - 2014 - In Robert M. Francescotti (ed.), Companion to Intrinsic Properties. De Gruyter. pp. 87-109.
    In the first half of this paper, I argue that essential properties are intrinsic and that this permits a modal analysis of essence that is immune the sort of objections raised by Fine. In the second half, I argue that intrinsic properties collectively have a certain structure and that this accounts for some observations about essences: that things are essentially determinate; that things often have properties within a certain range essentially; and that the essential properties of things are their core (...)
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  • Defending Musical Perdurantism.Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson - 2006 - British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):59-69.
    If musical works are abstract objects, which cannot enter into causal relations, then how can we refer to musical works or know anything about them? Worse, how can any of our musical experiences be experiences of musical works? It would be nice to be able to sidestep these questions altogether. One way to do that would be to take musical works to be concrete objects. In this paper, we defend a theory according to which musical works are concrete objects. In (...)
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  • Simples.Ned Markosian - 1998 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (2):213 – 228.
    Since the publication of Peter van Inwagen's book, Material Beings,1 there has been a growing body of philosophical literature on the topic of composition. The main question addressed in both van Inwagen's book and subsequent discussions of the topic is a question that van Inwagen calls "the Special Composition Question." The Special Composition Question is, roughly, the question Under what circumstances do several things compose, or add up to, or form, a single object? For the purposes of formulating a more (...)
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  • Words on Words.David Kaplan - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy 108 (9):504-529.
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  • On Words.John Hawthorne & Ernest Lepore - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy 108 (9):447-485.
    Under what conditions are two utterances utterances of the same word? What are words? That these questions have not received much attention is rather surprising: after all, philosophers and linguists frequently appeal to considerations about word and sentence identity in connection with a variety of puzzles and problems that are foundational to the very subject matter of philosophy of language and linguistics.1 Kaplan’s attention to words is thus to be applauded. And there is no doubt that his discussion contains many (...)
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