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  1. Hylomorphism and Functionalism.S. Marc Cohen - 1992 - In Martha Nussbaum & Amelie Rorty (eds.), Essays on Aristotle’s De Anima. Clarendon Press. pp. 57-73.
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  • Aristotle De Anima. [REVIEW]Christopher Shields - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):202-205.
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  • Ethics with Aristotle.Sarah Broadie - 1991 - Oxford University Press.
    In this incisive study Sarah Broadie gives an argued account of the main topics of Aristotle's ethics: eudaimonia, virtue, voluntary agency, practical reason, akrasia, pleasure, and the ethical status of theoria. She explores the sense of "eudaimonia," probes Aristotle's division of the soul and its virtues, and traces the ambiguities in "voluntary." Fresh light is shed on his comparison of practical wisdom with other kinds of knowledge, and a realistic account is developed of Aristototelian deliberation. The concept of pleasure as (...)
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  • Biological Matter and Perceptual Powers in Aristotle's de Anima.Theodore Scaltsas - 1996 - Topoi 15 (1):25-37.
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  • Aristotle: The Philosopher.J. L. Ackrill - 1981 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Rather than offering a mere lifeless summary of Aristotle's views, J.L. Ackrill aims in this book to convey the force and excitement of Aristotle's philosophical investigations, and show why contemporary philosophers still draw from him and return to him.
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  • Physiological Theory and the Doctrine of the Mean in Plato and Aristotle.Theodore James Tracy - 1969 - The Hague: Mouton.
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  • Aristotle’s “De Anima”: A Critical Commentary.Ronald Polansky - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's De Anima is the first systematic philosophical account of the soul, which serves to explain the functioning of all mortal living things. In his commentary, Ronald Polansky argues that the work is far more structured and systematic than previously supposed. He contends that Aristotle seeks a comprehensive understanding of the soul and its faculties. By closely tracing the unfolding of the many-layered argumentation and the way Aristotle fits his inquiry meticulously within his scheme of the sciences, Polansky answers questions (...)
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  • Aristotle: The Desire to Understand.Jonathan Lear - 1988 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a 1988 philosophical introduction to Aristotle, and Professor Lear starts where Aristotle himself starts. The first sentence of the Metaphysics states that all human beings by their nature desire to know. But what is it for us to be animated by this desire in this world? What is it for a creature to have a nature; what is our human nature; what must the world be like to be intelligible; and what must we be like to understand it (...)
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  • Aristotle on the Sense-Organs.T. K. Johansen - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers an important study of Aristotle's theory of the sense-organs. It aims to answer two questions central to Aristotle's psychology and biology: why does Aristotle think we have sense-organs, and why does he describe the sense-organs in the way he does? The author looks at all the Aristotelian evidence for the five senses and shows how pervasively Aristotle's accounts of the sense-organs are motivated by his interest in form and function. The book also engages with the celebrated problem (...)
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  • Aristotle on the Common Sense.Pavel Gregoric - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    I. The framework. 1, Aristotle's project and methods. 2, The perceptual capacity of the soul. 3, The sensory apparatus. 4, The common sense and the related capacities -- II. The terminology. 1, Overlooked occurrences of the phrase 'common sense'. 2, De anima III.1 425a27. 3, De partibus animalium IV.10 686a31. 4, De memoria et reminiscentia 1 450a10. 5, De anima III.7 431b5. 6, Conclusions on the terminology -- III. Functions of the common sense. 1, Simultaneous perception and cross-modal binding. 2, (...)
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  • Aristotle on Perception.Stephen Everson - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Everson presents a comprehensive new study of Aristotle's account of perception and related mental capacities. Recent debate about Aristotle's theory of mind has focused on this account, which is Aristotle's most sustained and detailed attempt to describe and explain the behavior of living things. Everson places this account in the context of Aristotle's natural science as a whole, showing how Aristotle applies the explanatory tools he developed in other works to the study of perceptual cognition.
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  • The Central Doctrine of the Mean.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2006 - In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 96--115.
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  • Aristotle on Sense Perception.Thomas J. Slakey - 1961 - Philosophical Review 70 (4):470-484.
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  • Aristotle's Mark of Sentience.Alain Ducharme - 2014 - Apeiron 47 (3):293-309.
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  • Aristotle’s Mark of Sentience.Alain Ducharme - 2014 - Apeiron 47 (3):293-309.
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  • Aristotle on Perception: The Dual-Logos Theory.David Bradshaw - 1997 - Apeiron 30 (2):143 - 161.
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  • Aristotle on Perceptual Discrimination.Mika Perälä - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (3):257-292.
    _ Source: _Volume 63, Issue 3, pp 257 - 292 It is commonly assumed that Aristotle defines a sense by reference to its ability to perceive the items that are proper to that sense, and that he explains perceptions of unities of these items, and discriminations between them, by reference to what is called the ‘common sense’. This paper argues in contrast that Aristotle defines a sense by reference, not only to its ability to perceive the proper items, but also (...)
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  • Aristotle on Odour and Smell.Mark A. Johnstone - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:143-83.
    The sense of smell occupies a peculiar intermediate position within Aristotle's theory of sense perception: odours, like colours and sounds, are perceived at a distance through an external medium of air or water; yet in their nature they are intimately related to flavours, the proper objects of taste, which for Aristotle is a form of touch. In this paper, I examine Aristotle's claims about odour and smell, especially in De Anima II.9 and De Sensu 5, to see what light they (...)
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  • Aristotle on What Is Done in Perceiving.Theodor Ebert - 1983 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 37 (2):181 - 198.
    The paper discusses the active part in the process of perceiving, usually expressed by the Greek word krinein. It is argued that krinein in one of its uses means "to judge" in the sense of judging a case, i. e. deciding it. It is not used for making statements. A second meaning of the Greek word is that of discerning or discriminating, and it is this meaning that plays a central part in Aristotle's theory of perception.
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  • Aristotle on the Sense of Touch.Cynthia Freeland - 1979 - In Martha Craven Nussbaum & Amélie Rorty (eds.), Essays on Aristotle's de Anima. Oxford University Press. pp. 227--248.
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  • Aristotelian Perceptions.A. W. Price - 1996 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):285-309.
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  • Material Alteration and Cognitive Activity in Aristotle's De Anima.John Sisko - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (2):138-157.
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  • Sense Organs and the Activity of Sensation in Aristotle.Joseph Magee - 2000 - Phronesis 45 (4):306 - 330.
    Amid the ongoing debate over the proper interpretation of Aristotle's theory of sense perception in the "De Anima," Steven Everson has recently presented a well-documented and ambitious treatment of the issue, arguing in favor of Richard Sorabji's controversial position that sense organs literally take on the qualities of their proper objects. Against the interpretation of M. F. Burnyeat, Everson and others make a compelling case the Aristotelian account of sensation requires some physical process to occur in sense organs. A detailed (...)
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  • Aristotle on Why Plants Cannot Perceive.Damian Murphy - 2005 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxix: Winter 2005. Oxford University Press.
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  • Is an Aristotelian Philosophy of Mind Still Credible? (A Draft).Myles Burnyeat - 1992 - In Martha C. Nussbaum & Amelie Oksenberg Rorty (eds.), Essays on Aristotle’s de Anima. Clarendon Press. pp. 15-26.
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  • Material Alteration and Cognitive Activity in Aristotle's "De Anima".John E. Sisko - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (2):138 - 157.
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  • The Spirit and the Letter: Aristotle on Perception.Victor Caston - 2004 - In Ricardo Salles (ed.), Metaphysics, Soul and Ethics: Themes From the Work of Richard Sorabji. Oxford University Press. pp. 245-320.
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  • Body and Soul in Aristotle: Richard Sorabji.Richard Sorabji - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (187):63-89.
    Interpretations of Aristotle's account of the relation between body and soul have been widely divergent. At one extreme, Thomas Slakey has said that in the De Anima ‘Aristotle tries to explain perception simply as an event in the sense-organs’. Wallace Matson has generalized the point. Of the Greeks in general he says, ‘Mind–body identity was taken for granted.… Indeed, in the whole classical corpus there exists no denial of the view that sensing is a bodily process throughout’. At the opposite (...)
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  • Alteration and Quasi-Alteration: A Critical Notice of Stephen Everson, Aristotle on Perception'.John E. Sisko - 1998 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 16:331-52.
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  • Aristotle de Anima.R. D. Hicks - 1908 - Mind 17 (68):535-548.
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  • Body and Soul in Aristotle.Richard Sorabji - 1993 - In Michael Durrant & Aristotle (eds.), Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 63-.
    Interpretations of Aristotle's account of the relation between body and soul have been widely divergent. At one extreme, Thomas Slakey has said that in the De Anima ‘Aristotle tries to explain perception simply as an event in the sense-organs’. Wallace Matson has generalized the point. Of the Greeks in general he says, ‘Mind–body identity was taken for granted.… Indeed, in the whole classical corpus there exists no denial of the view that sensing is a bodily process throughout’. At the opposite (...)
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  • Aristotle’s Mark of Sentience. Alainducharme - 2014 - Apeiron 47 (3):293-309.
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  • Aristotle on Sensory Processes and Intentionality: A Reply to Burnyeat.Richard Sorabji - 2001 - In Dominik Perler (ed.), Ancient and Medieval Theories of Intentionality. Brill. pp. 49-61.
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  • In Defense of Inner Sense: Aristotle on Perceiving That One Sees.Thomas K. Johansen - 2005 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 21:235-276.
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  • Ancient and Medieval Theories of Intentionality.Myles Burnyeat, Richard Gaskin, Joël Biard, Peter Simons, Victor Caston, Richard Sorabji, Christof Rapp, Hermann Weidemann, Dorothea Frede, Claude Panaccio, Elizabeth Karger, Robert Pasnau & Cyrille Michon - 2001 - Brill.
    This volume, including sixteen contributions, analyses ancient and medieval theories of intentionality in various contexts: perception, imagination, and intellectual thinking. It sheds new light on classical theories and examines neglected sources, both Greek and Latin.
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  • Theories, Technologies, Instrumentalities of Color: Anthropological and Historiographic Perspectives.Debi Roberson, Ian Davies, Jules Davidoff, Arnold Henselmans, Don Dedrick, Alan Costall, Angus Gellatly, Paul Whittle, Patrick Heelan, Rainer Mausfeld, Jaap van Brakel, Thomas Johansen, Hans Kraml, Joseph Wachelder, Friedrich Steinle & Ton Derksen - 2002 - Upa.
    Theories, Technologies, Instrumentalities of Color is the outcome of a workshop, held in Leuven, Belgium, in May 2000.
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