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  1. The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy.Martha C. Nussbaum - 1987 - Phronesis 32 (1):101-131.
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  • Plato’s Parmenides: The Conversion of the Soul. [REVIEW]Mark L. Mcpherran - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):421.
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  • Unity and Logos: A Reading of Theaetetus 201c-210a.Mitchell Miller - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):87-111.
    A close reading of Socrates’ arguments against the proposed definition of knowledge as true opinion together with a logos (“account”). I examine the orienting implications of his apparently destructive dilemma defeating the so-called dream theory and of his apparently decisive arguments rejecting the notions of “account” as verbalization, as working through the parts of the whole of the definiendum, and as identifying what differentiates the definiendum from all else. Whereas the dilemma implies of the object of knowledge that it must (...)
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  • The Aesthetics of Mimesis: Ancient Texts and Modern Problems.Elizabeth Belfiore - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):235-239.
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  • The Art of Living: Socratic Reflections From Plato to Foucault.Alexander Nehamas - 1998 - University of California Press.
    For much of its history, philosophy was not merely a theoretical discipline but a way of life, an "art of living." This practical aspect of philosophy has been much less dominant in modernity than it was in ancient Greece and Rome, when philosophers of all stripes kept returning to Socrates as a model for living. The idea of philosophy as an art of living has survived in the works of such major modern authors as Montaigne, Nietzsche, and Foucault. Each of (...)
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  • Chorology: On Beginning in Plato's Timaeus.John Sallis - 1999 - Indiana University Press.
    "This excellent work... deserves the serious consideration of all who are interested in contemporary philosophy as well as those who concern themselves with ancient philosophy, especially Plato." —Review of Metaphysics In Chorology, John Sallis takes up one of the most enigmatic discourses in the history of philosophy. Plato's discourse on the chora—the chorology—forms the pivotal moment in the Timaeus. The implications of the chorology are momentous and communicate with many of the most decisive issues in contemporary philosophical discussions.
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  • The Greeks on Pleasure.J. C. B. Gosling & C. C. W. Taylor - 1982 - Oxford University Press.
    Provides a critical and analytical history of ancient Greek theories on the nature of pleasure, and of its value and rolein human lfie, from the ealriest times down to the period of Epicurus and the early Stoics.
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  • The Art of Living: Socratic Reflections From Plato to Foucault.Fred L. Rush - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (4):473-475.
    For much of its history, philosophy was not merely a theoretical discipline but a way of life, an "art of living." This practical aspect of philosophy has been much less dominant in modernity than it was in ancient Greece and Rome, when philosophers of all stripes kept returning to Socrates as a model for living. The idea of philosophy as an art of living has survived in the works of such major modern authors as Montaigne, Nietzsche, and Foucault. Each of (...)
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  • Questioning Platonism: Continental Interpretations of Plato.Drew A. Hyland - 2004 - State University of New York Press.
    Explores interpretations of Plato by Heidegger, Derrida, Irigaray, Cavarero, and Gadamer.
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  • The Socratic Paradox and its Enemies.Roslyn Weiss - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    In The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies, Roslyn Weiss argues that the Socratic paradoxes—no one does wrong willingly, virtue is knowledge, and all the virtues are one—are best understood as Socrates’ way of combating sophistic views: ...
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  • The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy.Paul B. Woodruff - 1989 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (1):205-210.
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  • "Unwritten Teachings" in the "Parmenides".Mitchell Miller - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (3):591 - 633.
    An examination on the one hand of Aristotle's report in Metaphysics A6 of Plato's teachings regarding the One, the dyad of the Great and the Small, and mathematical intermediates and on the other hand of key passages in Plato's Parmenides. I argue that we can find in those passages exhibitions of the teachings Aristotle reports and that these exhibitions help us to understand those teachings.
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  • The Philosopher in Plato’s Statesman. [REVIEW]U. S. - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (4):796-798.
    Miller begins by contrasting two ways of regarding Plato’s Statesman. According to "the standard view," this late work is more a treatise than a dialogue. Here Plato’s doctrinal intent clearly overwhelmed his flair for dramatic invention. His positive teaching is presented by a stranger; Socrates the questioner is given a minor role. According to Miller, on the other hand, the Statesman is no less than any other Platonic dialogue a unity whose form and content, dramatic situation and argument, communicative function (...)
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  • The General Account of Pleasure in Plato's Philebus.Thomas Tuozzo - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (4):495-513.
    The General Account of Pleasure in Plato's Philebus THOMAS M. TUOZZO 1. INTRODUCTION DOES PLATO IN THE Philebus present a single general account of pleasure, applicable to all of the kinds of pleasure he discusses in that dialogue? Gosling and Taylor think not;' Dorothea Frede has recently reasserted a version of the contrary, traditional view. 2 The traditional view, I shall argue in this essay, is correct: the Philebus does contain a general account of pleasure applicable to all pleasures. Nonetheless, (...)
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  • The Structure of the Plato Dialogue.Jonathan Ketchum - 1981 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Buffalo
    This dissertation is the documentation of a discovery that most of the Plato dialogues generally considered authentic are composed according to the dictates of one and the same structure. It is comprised of an introduction , and three main sections named the protrepsis, the incursion, and the exegesis. In addition, a principle of internal tripartition is in play, such that each main section excepting the incursion is subdivided into three sections, which in turn are again subdivided into three subsections, which (...)
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  • Platonic Provocations: Reflections on the Soul and the Good in the Republic.Mitchell Miller - 1985 - In Dominic O'Meara (ed.), Platonic Investigations. Catholic University of America Press. pp. 163-193.
    Reflections on the linkage between and the provocative force of problems in the analogy of city and soul, in the simile-bound characterization of the Good, and in the performative tension between what Plato has Socrates say about the philosopher's disinclination to descend into the city and what he has Socrates do in descending into the Piraeus to teach, with a closing recognition of the analogy between Socratic teaching and Platonic writing.
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