Switch to: Citations

References in:

The metaphysics of forces

Dialectica 63 (4):555-589 (2009)

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Newtonian Forces.J. Wilson - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (2):173-205.
    Newtonian forces are pushes and pulls, possessing magnitude and direction, that are exerted (in the first instance) by objects, and which cause (in particular) motions. I defend Newtonian forces against the four best reasons for denying or doubting their existence. A running theme in my defense of forces will be the suggestion that Newtonian Mechanics is a special science, and as such has certain prima facie ontological rights and privileges, that may be maintained against various challenges.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Causal Powers, Forces, and Superdupervenience.Jessica M. Wilson - 2002 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 63 (1):53-77.
    Horgan (1993) proposed that "superdupervenience" - supervenience preserving physicalistic acceptability - is a matter of robust explanation. I argued against him (1999) that (as nearly all physicalist and emergentist accounts reflect) superdupervenience is a matter of Condition on Causal Powers (CCP): every causal power bestowed by the supervenient property is identical with a causal power bestowed by its base property. Here I show that CCP is, as it stands, unsatisfactory,for on the usual understandings of causal power bestowal, it is trivially (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • The Causal Argument Against Component Forces.Jessica Wilson - 2009 - Dialectica 63 (4):525-554.
    Do component forces exist in conjoined circumstances? Cartwright (1980) says no; Creary (1981) says yes. I'm inclined towards Cartwright's side in this matter, but find several problems with her argumentation. My primary aim here is to present a better, distinctly causal, argument against component forces: very roughly, I argue that the joint posit of component and resultant forces in conjoined circumstances gives rise to a threat of causal overdetermination, avoidance of which best proceeds via eliminativism about component forces. A secondary (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Causal Production as Interaction.Rognvaldur Ingthorsson - 2002 - Metaphysica 3 (1):87-119.
    The paper contains a novel realist account of causal production and the necessary connection between cause and effect. I argue that the asymmetric relation between causally connected events must be regarded as a product of a symmetric interaction between two or more entities. All the entities involved contribute to the producing, and so count as parts of the cause, and they all suffer a change, and so count as parts of the effect. Cause and effect, on this account, are two (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • How the Laws of Physics Lie.Nancy Cartwright - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
    In this sequence of philosophical essays about natural science, the author argues that fundamental explanatory laws, the deepest and most admired successes of modern physics, do not in fact describe regularities that exist in nature. Cartwright draws from many real-life examples to propound a novel distinction: that theoretical entities, and the complex and localized laws that describe them, can be interpreted realistically, but the simple unifying laws of basic theory cannot.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   403 citations  
  • The Existence of Forces.Brian Ellis - 1976 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 7 (2):171.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • The Existence of Forces.Brian Ellis - 1976 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 7 (2):171-185.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Unification, Explanation, and the Composition of Causes in Newtonian Mechanics.Malcolm R. Forster - 1988 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (1):55-101.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Is Motion Change of Location?Peter Forrest - 1984 - Analysis 44 (4):177 - 178.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Principles of Mathematics.Bertrand Russell - 1903 - Cambridge University Press.
    Published in 1903, this book was the first comprehensive treatise on the logical foundations of mathematics written in English. It sets forth, as far as possible without mathematical and logical symbolism, the grounds in favour of the view that mathematics and logic are identical. It proposes simply that what is commonly called mathematics are merely later deductions from logical premises. It provided the thesis for which _Principia Mathematica_ provided the detailed proof, and introduced the work of Frege to a wider (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   278 citations  
  • A Treatise of Human Nature: Being an Attempt to Introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning Into Moral Subjects.David Hume (ed.) - 1738 - Oxford University Press.
    A Treatise of Human Nature, David Hume's comprehensive attempt to base philosophy on a new, observationally grounded study of human nature, is one of the most important texts in Western philosophy. It is also the focal point of current attempts to understand 18th-century western philosophy. The Treatise addresses many of the most fundamental philosophical issues: causation, existence, freedom and necessity, and morality. The volume also includes Humes own abstract of the Treatise, a substantial introduction, extensive annotations, a glossary, a comprehensive (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   800 citations  
  • Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science.Immanuel Kant - 1970 - Cambridge University Press.
    Kant was centrally concerned with issues in the philosophy of natural science throughout his career. The Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science presents his most mature reflections on these themes in the context of both his 'critical' philosophy, presented in the Critique of Pure Reason, and the natural science of his time. This volume presents a new translation, by Michael Friedman, which is especially clear and accurate. There are explanatory notes indicating some of the main connections between the argument of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  • Ceteris Paribus Clauses, Closure Clauses and Falsifiability.Ingvar Johansson - 1980 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 11 (1):16-22.
    Summary The article argues thatceteris paribus clauses have to be separated from another type of clauses called closure clauses. The former are associated with laws and theories, the latter with test situations of a particular kind. It is also argued that closure clauses, but notceteris paribus clauses, make Popper's falsifiability principle untenable. In that way, it also resolves the quarrel between Popper and Lakatos aboutceteris paribus clauses and falsifiability by saying that both are partly wrong and partly right.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.Isaac Newton - 1999 - University of California Press.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   72 citations  
  • Relations Through Thick and Thin.Kevin Mulligan - 1998 - Erkenntnis 48 (2-3):325 - 353.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • A Materialist Theory of the Mind.D. M. Armstrong - 1968 - Routledge.
    Breaking new ground in the debate about the relation of mind and body, David Armstrong's classic text - first published in 1968 - remains the most compelling and comprehensive statement of the view that the mind is material or physical. In the preface to this new edition, the author reflects on the book's impact and considers it in the light of subsequent developments. He also provides a bibliography of all the key writings to have appeared in the materialist debate.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   454 citations  
  • Powers: A Study in Metaphysics.George Molnar - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    George Molnar came to see that the solution to a number of the problems in contemporary philosophy lay in the development of an alternative to Hume's metaphysics, with real causal powers at its center. Molnar's eagerly anticipated book setting out his theory of powers was almost complete when he died, and has been prepared for publication by Stephen Mumford, who provides a context-setting introduction.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   98 citations  
  • Matter, Motion, and Humean Supervenience.Denis Robinson - 1989 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (4):394 – 409.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Science and Necessity.John Bigelow & Robert Pargetter - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book espouses an innovative theory of scientific realism in which due weight is given to mathematics and logic. The authors argue that mathematics can be understood realistically if it is seen to be the study of universals, of properties and relations, of patterns and structures, the kinds of things which can be in several places at once. Taking this kind of scientific platonism as their point of departure, they show how the theory of universals can account for probability, laws (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Space-Time Relationism in Newtonian and Relativistic Physics.Dennis Dieks - 2000 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (1):5 – 17.
    I argue that there is natural relationist interpretation of Newtonian and relativistic non-quantum physics. Although relationist, this interpretation does not fall prey to the traditional objections based on the existence of inertial effects.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Forces and Fields: The Concept of Action at a Distance in the History of Physics.Mary B. Hesse - 1961 - Dover Publications.
    This history of physics focuses on the question, "How do bodies act on one another across space?" The variety of answers illustrates the function of fundamental analogies or models in physics as well as the role of so-called unobservable entities. Forces and Fields presents an in-depth look at the science of ancient Greece, and it examines the influence of antique philosophy on seventeenth-century thought. Additional topics embrace many elements of modern physics--the empirical basis of quantum mechanics, wave-particle duality and the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Humean Supervenience Debugged.David Lewis - 1994 - Mind 103 (412):473--490.
    Tn this paper I explore and to an extent defend HS. The main philosophical challenges to HS come from philosophical views that say that nomic concepts-laws, chance, and causation-denote features of the world that fail to supervene on non-nomic features. Lewis rejects these views and has labored mightily to construct HS accounts of nomic concepts. His account of laws is fundamental to his program, since his accounts of the other nomic notions rely on it. Recently, a number of philosophers have (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   265 citations  
  • In Defense of the Existence of States of Motion.Michael Tooley - 1988 - Philosophical Topics 16 (1):225-254.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  • Realism and Causation.Galen Strawson - 1987 - Philosophical Quarterly 37 (148):253-277.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Concepts of Force.Max Jammer - 1957 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20 (1):132-132.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • The Metaphysics of Impenetrability: Euler's Conception of Force.Stephen Gaukroger - 1982 - British Journal for the History of Science 15 (2):132-154.
    In this paper I want to examine in some detail one eighteenth-century attempt to restructure the foundations of mechanics, that of Leonhard Euler. It is now generally recognized that the idea, due to Mach, that all that happened in the eighteenth century was the elaboration of a deductive and mathematical mechanics on the basis of Newton's Laws is misleading at best. Newton's Principia needed much more than a reformulation in analytic terms if it was to provide the basis for the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A World of States of Affairs.John Heil & D. M. Armstrong - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (1):115.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   116 citations  
  • Forces.John Bigelow, Brian Ellis & Robert Pargetter - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (4):614-630.
    Traditionally, forces are causes of a special sort. Forces have been conceived to be the direct or immediate causes of things. Other sorts of causes act indirectly by producing forces which are transmitted in various ways to produce various effects. However, forces are supposed to act directly without the mediation of anything else. But forces, so conceived, appear to be occult. They are mysterious, because we have no clear conception of what they are, as opposed to what they are postulated (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Causation as Simultaneous and Continuous.Michael Huemer & Ben Kovitz - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):556–565.
    We propose that all actual causes are simultaneous with their direct effects, as illustrated by both everyday examples and the laws of physics. We contrast this view with the sequential conception of causation, according to which causes must occur prior to their effects. The key difference between the two views of causation lies in differing assumptions about the mathematical structure of time.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • III. The Concept of Force.P. Foulkes - 1952 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):130 – 132.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Concept of Force.P. Foulkes - 1951 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 29 (3):175 – 180.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Papers in Metaphysics and Epistemology.David Lewis - 1999 - Cambridge: Uk ;Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is devoted to Lewis's work in metaphysics and epistemology. Topics covered include properties, ontology, possibility, truthmaking, probability, the mind-body problem, vision, belief, and knowledge. The purpose of this collection, and the volumes that precede and follow it, is to disseminate more widely the work of an eminent and influential contemporary philosopher. The volume will serve as a useful work of reference for teachers and students of philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   116 citations  
  • The Scientific Image.C. Van Fraassen Bas - 1980 - Oxford University Press.
    In this book van Fraassen develops an alternative to scientific realism by constructing and evaluating three mutually reinforcing theories.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   278 citations  
  • Scientific Essentialism.Brian Ellis - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Scientific Essentialism defends the view that the fundamental laws of nature depend on the essential properties of the things on which they are said to operate, and are therefore not independent of them. These laws are not imposed upon the world by God, the forces of nature or anything else, but rather are immanent in the world. Ellis argues that ours is a dynamic world consisting of more or less transient objects which are constantly interacting with each other, and whose (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   144 citations  
  • The Shapes of Incongruent Counterparts.Josh Parsons - manuscript
    Paper begins: I have two gloves, a left glove and a right glove. I can fit the left glove onto my left hand, but not the right glove. Why? Because the right glove is the wrong shape to go on my left hand. So the two gloves are different shapes….
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Physical Basis of Predication.Andrew Newman - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book about metaphysics the author defends a realistic view of universals, characterizing the notion of universal by considering language and logic, the idea of possibility, hierarchies of universals, and causation. He argues that neither language nor logic is a reliable guide to the nature of reality and that basic universals are the fundamental type of universal and are central to causation. All assertions and predications about the natural world are ultimately founded on these basic universals. A distinction is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Scientific Thought.C. D. Broad - 1923 - Routledge and Kegan Paul.
    First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   85 citations  
  • Right, Left, and the Fourth Dimension.James van Cleve - 1987 - Philosophical Review 96 (1):33-68.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Converse Relations.Timothy Williamson - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (2):249-262.
    The full-text of this article is not currently available in ORA, but you may be able to access the article via the publisher copy link on this record page. N.B. Prof Williamson is now based at the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Oxford.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • A World of States of Affairs.D. M. Armstrong - 1993 - Philosophical Perspectives 7 (3):429-440.
    In this important study D. M. Armstrong offers a comprehensive system of analytical metaphysics that synthesises but also develops his thinking over the last twenty years. Armstrong's analysis, which acknowledges the 'logical atomism' of Russell and Wittgenstein, makes facts the fundamental constituents of the world, examining properties, relations, numbers, classes, possibility and necessity, dispositions, causes and laws. All these, it is argued, find their place and can be understood inside a scheme of states of affairs. This is a comprehensive and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   333 citations  
  • Causation and Universals.Evan Fales - 1990 - Routledge.
    The world contains objective causal relations and universals, both of which are intimately connected. If these claims are true, they must have far-reaching consequences, breathing new life into the theory of empirical knowledge and reinforcing epistemological realism. Without causes and universals, Professor Fales argues, realism is defeated, and idealism or scepticism wins. Fales begins with a detailed analysis of David Hume's argument that we have no direct experience of necessary connections between events, concluding that Hume was mistaken on this fundamental (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   96 citations  
  • Philosophical Papers.David K. Lewis - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
    This is the second volume of philosophical essays by one of the most innovative and influential philosophers now writing in English. Containing thirteen papers in all, the book includes both new essays and previously published papers, some of them with extensive new postscripts reflecting Lewis's current thinking. The papers in Volume II focus on causation and several other closely related topics, including counterfactual and indicative conditionals, the direction of time, subjective and objective probability, causation, explanation, perception, free will, and rational (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   320 citations  
  • Ceteris Paribus Clauses, Closure Clauses and Falsifiability.Ingvar Johansson - 1980 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 11 (1):16-22.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Vectors and Change.John Bigelow & Robert Pargetter - 1989 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (3):289-306.
    Vectors, we will argue, are not just mathematical abstractions. They are also physical properties--universals. What make them distinctive are the rich and varied essences of these universals, and the complex pattern of internal relations which hold amongst them.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Perception and Cognition.John Heil - 1983 - University of California Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   131 citations  
  • A Theory of Universals. Universals and Scientific Realism Volume Ii.David Malet Armstrong - 1978 - Cambridge University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   72 citations  
  • The Concept of Force.P. Foulkes - 1952 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 30:130.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • One Wave or Three? A Problem for Realism.Neil A. Sheldon - 1985 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (4):431-436.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Principles of Mechanics Presented in a New Form.Heinrich Hertz, D. E. Jones & J. T. Walley - 1957 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 8 (31):257-258.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Converse Relations, Vectors, And Three Theses From Armstrong.Andrew Newman - 2002 - Metaphysica 3 (2).
    The second thesis from Armstrong is that a relation and its converse are identical, so that the instantiation of the converse relation represents no increase in being. This is the identity thesis for converse relations. In the context of Armstrong’s notion of..
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations