Switch to: Citations

References in:

Immunity and the Emergence of Individuality

In Philippe Huneman & Frédéric Bouchard (eds.), From Groups to Individuals. Evolution and Emerging Individuality. MIT Press. pp. 77 (2013)

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. The Limits of the Self: Immunology and Biological Identity.Thomas Pradeu - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    The Limits of the Self, will be essential reading for anyone interested in the definition of biological individuality and the understanding of the immune system.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • The Self Model and the Conception of Biological Identity in Immunology.Thomas Pradeu & Edgardo D. Carosella - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):235-252.
    The self/non-self model, first proposed by F.M. Burnet, has dominated immunology for 60 years now. According to this model, any foreign element will trigger an immune reaction in an organism, whereas endogenous elements will not, in normal circumstances, induce an immune reaction. In this paper we show that the self/non-self model is no longer an appropriate explanation of experimental data in immunology, and that this inadequacy may be rooted in an excessively strong metaphysical conception of biological identity. We suggest that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Symbiosis, Lateral Function Transfer and the (Many) Saplings of Life.Frédéric Bouchard - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):623-641.
    One of intuitions driving the acceptance of a neat structured tree of life is the assumption that organisms and the lineages they form have somewhat stable spatial and temporal boundaries. The phenomenon of symbiosis shows us that such ‘fixist’ assumptions does not correspond to how the natural world actually works. The implications of lateral gene transfer (LGT) have been discussed elsewhere; I wish to stress a related point. I will focus on lateral function transfer (LFT) and will argue, using examples (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • On the Transfer of Fitness From the Cell to the Multicellular Organism.Richard E. Michod - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (5):967-987.
    The fitness of any evolutionary unit can be understood in terms of its two basic components: fecundity (reproduction) and viability (survival). Trade-offs between these fitness components drive the evolution of life-history traits in extant multicellular organisms. We argue that these trade-offs gain special significance during the transition from unicellular to multicellular life. In particular, the evolution of germ–soma specialization and the emergence of individuality at the cell group (or organism) level are also consequences of trade-offs between the two basic fitness (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • What is an Organism? An Immunological Answer.Thomas Pradeu - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (2-3):247-267.
    The question “What is an organism?”, formerly considered as essential in biology, has now been increasingly replaced by a larger question, “What is a biological individual?”. On the grounds that i) individuation is theory-dependent, and ii) physiology does not offer a theory, biologists and philosophers of biology have claimed that it is the theory of evolution by natural selection which tells us what counts as a biological individual. Here I show that one physiological field, immunology, offers a theory, which makes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  • Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The book presents a new way of understanding Darwinism and evolution by natural selection, combining work in biology, philosophy, and other fields.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   155 citations  
  • On the Definition of a Criterion of Immunogenicity.Thomas Pradeu & Edgardo D. Carosella - 2006 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 103 (47):17858--17861.
    The main objective of immunology is to establish why and when an immune response occurs, that is, to determine a criterion of immunogenicity. According to the consensus view, the proper criterion of immunogenicity lies in the discrimination between self and nonself. Here we challenge this consensus by suggesting a simpler and more comprehensive criterion, the criterion of continuity. Moreover, we show that this criterion may be considered as an interpretation of the immune 'self'. We conclude that immunologists can continue to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Varieties of Living Things: Life at the Intersection of Lineage and Metabolism.John Dupré & Maureen A. O'Malley - 2009 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 1 (20130604).
    We address three fundamental questions: What does it mean for an entity to be living? What is the role of inter-organismic collaboration in evolution? What is a biological individual? Our central argument is that life arises when lineage-forming entities collaborate in metabolism. By conceiving of metabolism as a collaborative process performed by functional wholes, which are associations of a variety of lineage-forming entities, we avoid the standard tension between reproduction and metabolism in discussions of life – a tension particularly evident (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  • A Mixed Self: The Role of Symbiosis in Development.Thomas Pradeu - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (1):80-88.
    Since the 1950s, the common view of development has been internalist: development is seen as the result of the unfolding of potentialities already present in the egg cell. In this paper I show that this view is incorrect, because of the crucial influence of the environment on development. I focus on a fascinating example, that of the role played by symbioses in development, especially bacterial symbioses, a phenomenon found in virtually all organisms. I claim that we must consequently modify our (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • The Problem of Biological Individuality.Ellen Clarke - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (4):312-325.
    Darwin’s classic ‘Origin of Species’ (Darwin 1859) described forces of selection acting upon individuals, but there remains a great deal of controversy about what exactly the status and definition of a biological individual is. Recently some authors have argued that the individual is dispensable – that an inability to pin it down is not problematic because little rests on it anyway. The aim of this paper is to show that there is a real problem of biological individuality, and an urgent (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • A Twelve‐Step Program for Evolving Multicellularity and a Division of Labor.David L. Kirk - 2005 - Bioessays 27 (3):299-310.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • The Immune Self: Theory or Metaphor?Alfred I. Tauber - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is one of the first books in a new series that will publish the very best work in the philosophy of biology. The series will be non-sectarian in character, will extend across the broadest range of topics, and will be genuinely interdisciplinary. The Immune Self is a critical study of immunology from its origins at the end of the nineteenth century to its contemporary formulation. The book offers the first extended philosophical critique of immunology, in which the function of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • A Matter of Individuality.David L. Hull - 1978 - Philosophy of Science 45 (3):335-360.
    Biological species have been treated traditionally as spatiotemporally unrestricted classes. If they are to perform the function which they do in the evolutionary process, they must be spatiotemporally localized individuals, historical entities. Reinterpreting biological species as historical entities solves several important anomalies in biology, in philosophy of biology, and within philosophy itself. It also has important implications for any attempt to present an "evolutionary" analysis of science and for sciences such as anthropology which are devoted to the study of single (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   274 citations  
  • The Biological Notion of Individual.Robert A. Wilson & Matthew J. Barker - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Individuals are a prominent part of the biological world. Although biologists and philosophers of biology draw freely on the concept of an individual in articulating both widely accepted and more controversial claims, there has been little explicit work devoted to the biological notion of an individual itself. How should we think about biological individuals? What are the roles that biological individuals play in processes such as natural selection (are genes and groups also units of selection?), speciation (are species individuals?), and (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Biological Individuality: The Identity and Persistence of Living Entities.Jack Wilson - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (203):264-266.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • Evolution and the Levels of Selection.Samir Okasha - 2009 - Critica 41 (123):162-170.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   183 citations  
  • Immune System.Thomas Pradeu - 2009 - Science 325:393--393.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Immune Self: Theory or Metaphor?Alfred I. Tauber - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is one of the first books in a new series that will publish the very best work in the philosophy of biology. The series will be non-sectarian in character, will extend across the broadest range of topics, and will be genuinely interdisciplinary. The Immune Self is a critical study of immunology from its origins at the end of the nineteenth century to its contemporary formulation. The book offers the first extended philosophical critique of immunology, in which the function of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • The Major Transitions in Evolution.John Maynard Smith & Eors Szathmary - 1996 - Journal of the History of Biology 29 (1):151-152.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   170 citations  
  • Evolution and the Levels of Selection.Samir Okasha - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Does natural selection act primarily on individual organisms, on groups, on genes, or on whole species? The question of levels of selection - on which biologists and philosophers have long disagreed - is central to evolutionary theory and to the philosophy of biology. Samir Okasha's comprehensive analysis gives a clear account of the philosophical issues at stake in the current debate.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   104 citations  
  • Individuality and Selection.David L. Hull - 1980 - Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 11:311-332.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   139 citations  
  • Individuality and Adaptation Across Levels of Selection: How Shall We Name and Generalize the Unit of Darwinism?Stephen Jay Gould & Elisabeth A. Lloyd - 1999 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 96 (21):11904-09.
    Two major clarifications have greatly abetted the understanding and fruitful expansion of the theory of natural selection in recent years: the acknowledgment that interactors, not replicators, constitute the causal unit of selection; and the recognition that interactors are Darwinian individuals, and that such individuals exist with potency at several levels of organization (genes, organisms, demes, and species in particular), thus engendering a rich hierarchical theory of selection in contrast with Darwin’s own emphasis on the organismic level. But a piece of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations