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  1. Carnapian and Tarskian Semantics.Pierre Wagner - 2017 - Synthese 194 (1):97-119.
    Many papers have been devoted to the semantic turn Carnap took in the late 1930s after Tarski had explained to him his method for defining truth and his work on the establishment of scientific semantics. Commentators have often argued that the major turn in Carnap’s approach to languages had already been taken in the Logical Syntax of Language, but they have usually assumed that Carnap was happy to subsequently follow Tarski and adopt Tarskian semantics. In this paper, it is argued (...)
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  • Desire Beyond Belief.Philip Pettit & Alan Hájek - 2004 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):77.
    David Lewis [1988; 1996] canvases an anti-Humean thesis about mental states: that the rational agent desires something to the extent that he or she believes it to be good. Lewis offers and refutes a decision-theoretic formulation of it, the 'Desire-as-Belief Thesis'. Other authors have since added further negative results in the spirit of Lewis's. We explore ways of being anti-Humean that evade all these negative results. We begin by providing background on evidential decision theory and on Lewis's negative results. We (...)
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  • Desire-as-Belief Revisited.Richard Bradley & Christian List - unknown
    On Hume’s account of motivation, beliefs and desires are very different kinds of propositional attitudes. Beliefs are cognitive attitudes, desires emotive ones. An agent’s belief in a proposition captures the weight he or she assigns to this proposition in his or her cognitive representation of the world. An agent’s desire for a proposition captures the degree to which he or she prefers its truth, motivating him or her to act accordingly. Although beliefs and desires are sometimes entangled, they play very (...)
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  • The Logical Syntax of Language.Rudolf Carnap - 1937 - London: K. Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co..
    Available for the first time in 20 years, here is the Rudolf Carnap's famous principle of tolerance by which everyone is free to mix and match the rules of ...
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  • Phenomenologie de la Perception.Aron Gurwitsch - 1950 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 10 (3):442-445.
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  • Aristotle.Joseph Ratner - 1924 - Journal of Philosophy 21 (13):357-361.
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  • The Logical Syntax of Language.E. N. - 1937 - Journal of Philosophy 34 (11):303.
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  • Foundations of the Social Sciences.Morton G. White - 1944 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 9 (4):100-101.
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  • Signs, Language, and Behavior.Max Black - 1947 - Philosophical Review 56 (2):203.
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  • The Foundations of Scientific Inference.William H. Baumer - 1966 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 29 (3):472-473.
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  • In Defense of Pure Reason: A Rationalist Account of a Priori Justification.Erik J. Olsson - 1998 - Erkenntnis 49 (2):243-249.
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  • Choice and Chance: An Introduction to Inductive Logic.David F. Siemens - 1966 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 41 (2):547.
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  • On the Justification of Induction.Hans Reichenbach - 1940 - Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):97-103.
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  • Hume, the BAD Paradox, and Value Realism.Graham Oddie - 2001 - Philo 4 (2):109-122.
    A recent slew of arguments, if sound, would demonstrate that realism about value involves a kind of paradox-I call it the BAD paradox.More precisely, they show that if there are genuine propositions about the good, then one could maintain harmony between one’s desires and one’s beliefs about the good only on pain of violating fundamental principles of decision theory. I show. however, the BAD paradox turns out to be a version of Newcomb’s problem, and that the cognitivist about value can (...)
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  • On Hans Reichenbach’s Inductivism.Maria Carla Galavotti - 2011 - Synthese 181 (1):95-111.
    One of the first to criticize the verifiability theory of meaning embraced by logical empiricists, Reichenbach ties the significance of scientific statements to their predictive character, which offers the condition for their testability. While identifying prediction as the task of scientific knowledge, Reichenbach assigns induction a pivotal role, and regards the theory of knowledge as a theory of prediction based on induction. Reichenbach’s inductivism is grounded on the frequency notion of probability, of which he prompts a more flexible version than (...)
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  • Desires, Beliefs and Conditional Desirability.H. Orri Stefánsson - 2014 - Synthese 191 (16):4019-4035.
    Does the desirability of a proposition depend on whether it is true? Not according to the Invariance assumption, held by several notable philosophers. The Invariance assumption plays an important role in David Lewis’ famous arguments against the so-called Desire-as-Belief thesis (DAB), an anti-Humean thesis according to which a rational agent desires a proposition exactly to the degree that she believes the proposition to be desirable. But the assumption is of interest independently of Lewis’ arguments, for instance since both Richard Jeffrey (...)
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  • The Logic of Probability.Bruno de Finetti - 1995 - Philosophical Studies 77 (1):181-190.
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  • Fifteen Arguments Against Hypothetical Frequentism.Alan Hájek - 2009 - Erkenntnis 70 (2):211-235.
    This is the sequel to my “Fifteen Arguments Against Finite Frequentism” ( Erkenntnis 1997), the second half of a long paper that attacks the two main forms of frequentism about probability. Hypothetical frequentism asserts: The probability of an attribute A in a reference class B is p iff the limit of the relative frequency of A ’s among the B ’s would be p if there were an infinite sequence of B ’s. I offer fifteen arguments against this analysis. I (...)
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  • Erwiderung Auf Die Vorstehenden Aufsätze Von E. Zilsel Und K. Duncker.Rudolf Carnap - 1932 - Erkenntnis 3 (1):177-188.
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  • Reliability Via Synthetic a Priori: Reichenbach’s Doctoral Thesis on Probability.Frederick Eberhardt - 2011 - Synthese 181 (1):125-136.
    Hans Reichenbach is well known for his limiting frequency view of probability, with his most thorough account given in The Theory of Probability in 1935/1949. Perhaps less known are Reichenbach's early views on probability and its epistemology. In his doctoral thesis from 1915, Reichenbach espouses a Kantian view of probability, where the convergence limit of an empirical frequency distribution is guaranteed to exist thanks to the synthetic a priori principle of lawful distribution. Reichenbach claims to have given a purely objective (...)
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  • Absolute Value as Belief.Steven Daskal - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 148 (2):221 - 229.
    In “Desire as Belief” and “Desire as Belief II,” David Lewis ( 1988 , 1996 ) considers the anti-Humean position that beliefs about the good require corresponding desires, which is his way of understanding the idea that beliefs about the good are capable of motivating behavior. He translates this anti-Humean claim into decision theoretic terms and demonstrates that it leads to absurdity and contradiction. As Ruth Weintraub ( 2007 ) has shown, Lewis’ argument goes awry at the outset. His decision (...)
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  • Reichenbach, Induction, and Discovery.Kevin T. Kelly - 1991 - Erkenntnis 35 (1-3):123 - 149.
    I have applied a fairly general, learning theoretic perspective to some questions raised by Reichenbach's positions on induction and discovery. This is appropriate in an examination of the significance of Reichenbach's work, since the learning-theoretic perspective is to some degree part of Reichenbach's reliabilist legacy. I have argued that Reichenbach's positivism and his infatuation with probabilities are both irrelevant to his views on induction, which are principally grounded in the notion of limiting reliability. I have suggested that limiting reliability is (...)
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  • Desire as Belief II.David K. Lewis - 1996 - Mind 105 (418):303-13.
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  • Desire as Belief.David K. Lewis - 1988 - Mind 97 (418):323-32.
    Argues for the humean theory of motivation on the grounds that rejecting it requires rejecting decision theory.
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  • Desire, Expectation, and Invariance.Richard Bradley & H. Orii Stefansson - 2016 - Mind 125 (499):691-725.
    The Desire-as-Belief thesis (DAB) states that any rational person desires a proposition exactly to the degree that she believes or expects the proposition to be good. Many people take David Lewis to have shown the thesis to be inconsistent with Bayesian decision theory. However, as we show, Lewis's argument was based on an Invariance condition that itself is inconsistent with the (standard formulation of the) version of Bayesian decision theory that he assumed in his arguments against DAB. The aim of (...)
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  • The Concept of Truth in Formalized Languages.Alfred Tarski - 1936 - In A. Tarski (ed.), Logic, Semantics, Metamathematics. Oxford University Press. pp. 152--278.
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  • Carnap and Twentieth-Century Thought: Explication as Enlightenment.A. W. Carus - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Rudolf Carnap is widely regarded as one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century. Born in Germany and later a US citizen, he was a founder of the philosophical movement known as Logical Empiricism. He was strongly influenced by a number of different philosophical traditions, and also by the German Youth Movement, the First World War, and radical socialism. This book places his central ideas in a broad cultural, political and intellectual context, showing how he synthesised many different (...)
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  • The Semantic Tradition From Kant to Carnap. To the Vienna Station.J. Alberto Coffa, Linda Wessels, Michael Dummett, Claire Ortiz Hill & Joan Weiner - 1995 - Synthese 105 (1):123-139.
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  • Probabilities of Conditionals and Conditional Probabilities II.David Lewis - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (4):581-589.
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  • Bruno de Finetti and the Logic of Conditional Events.Peter Milne - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (2):195-232.
    This article begins by outlining some of the history—beginning with brief remarks of Quine's—of work on conditional assertions and conditional events. The upshot of the historical narrative is that diverse works from various starting points have circled around a nexus of ideas without convincingly tying them together. Section 3 shows how ideas contained in a neglected article of de Finetti's lead to a unified treatment of the topics based on the identification of conditional events as the objects of conditional bets. (...)
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  • Choices: An Introduction to Decision Theory.Michael Resnik - 1987 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
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  • Foundations and Applications of Inductive Probability.Roger D. Rosenkrantz - 1981 - Ridgeview Press.
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  • A Reconsideration of the Problem of Induction.Laurence Bonjour - 1986 - Philosophical Topics 14 (1):93-124.
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  • Introduction to the Reading of Hegel: Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit.Alexandre Kojève - 1969 - Cornell University Press.
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  • .J. Wolenski - 1994
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  • VII.—Universal Jargon and Terminology.Otto Neurath - 1940 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 41 (1):127-148.
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  • The Unity of Science.Rudolf Carnap & Max Black - 1934 - London: K. Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co..
    As a leading member of the Vienna Circle, Rudolph Carnap's aim was to bring about a "unified science" by applying a method of logical analysis to the empirical data of all the sciences. This work, first published in English in 1934, endeavors to work out a way in which the observation statements required for verification are not private to the observer. The work shows the strong influence of Wittgenstein, Russell, and Frege.
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  • Aristotle and the Mind-Body Problem.Robert Heinaman - 1990 - Phronesis 35 (1):83-102.
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  • Corporealized and Disembodied Minds: A Phenomenological View of the Body in Melancholia and Schizophrenia.Thomas Fuchs - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):95-107.
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  • On the Character of Philosophic Problems.Rudolf Carnap - 1934 - Philosophy of Science 1 (1):5-19.
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  • Harmony, Purity, Truth.Graham Oddie - 1994 - Mind 103 (412):451-472.
    David Lewis has argued against the thesis he calls "Desire as Belief", claiming it is incompatible with the fundamentals of evidential decision theory. I show that the argument is unsound, and demonstrate that a version of desire as belief is compatible with a version of causal decision theory.
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  • Desire as Belief, Lewis Notwithstanding.Ruth Weintraub - 2007 - Analysis 67 (2):116-122.
    In two curiously neglected papers, David Lewis claims to reduce to absurdity the supposition (commonly labeled DAB) that (some) desires are belief-like. My aim in this paper is to explain the significance of this claim and rebut the proof.
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  • David Hume, David Lewis, and Decision Theory.Alex Byrne & Alan Hájek - 1997 - Mind 106 (423):411-728.
    David Lewis claims that a simple sort of anti-Humeanism-that the rational agent desires something to the extent he believes it to be good-can be given a decision-theoretic formulation, which Lewis calls 'Desire as Belief' (DAB). Given the (widely held) assumption that Jeffrey conditionalising is a rationally permissible way to change one's mind in the face of new evidence, Lewis proves that DAB leads to absurdity. Thus, according to Lewis, the simple form of anti-Humeanism stands refuted. In this paper we investigate (...)
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  • Defending Desire-as-Belief.Huw Price - 1989 - Mind 98 (January):119-27.
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  • On the Relations of Universals and Particulars.Bertrand Russell - 1911 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 12:1-24.
    The purpose of the following, paper is to consider whether there is a fundamenital division of the objects with which metaphysics is concerned into two classes, universals and particulars, or whetlher there is any method of overcoming this dualism. My own opinion is that the dualism is ultimate; on the other hand, many men with whom, in the main, I am in close agreement, hold that it is not ultimate. I do not feel the grounds in favour of its ultimate (...)
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  • Desire, Belief and Expectation.John Broome - 1991 - Mind 100 (2):265-267.
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  • Alfred Tarski and the “Concept of Truth in Formalized Languages”.Monika Gruber - 2016 - Springer Verlag.
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  • How the Cold War Transformed Philosophy of Science: To the Icy Slopes of Logic.George A. Reisch - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    This intriguing and ground-breaking book is the first in-depth study of the development of philosophy of science in the United States during the Cold War. It documents the political vitality of logical empiricism and Otto Neurath's Unity of Science Movement when these projects emigrated to the US in the 1930s and follows their de-politicization by a convergence of intellectual, cultural and political forces in the 1950s. Students of logical empiricism and the Vienna Circle treat these as strictly intellectual non-political projects. (...)
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  • The Semantic Tradition From Kant to Carnap: To the Vienna Station.Alberto Coffa - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    This major publication is a history of the semantic tradition in philosophy from the early nineteenth century through its incarnation in the work of the Vienna Circle, the group of logical positivists that emerged in the years 1925-1935 in Vienna who were characterised by a strong commitment to empiricism, a high regard for science, and a conviction that modern logic is the primary tool of analytic philosophy. In the first part of the book, Alberto Coffa traces the roots of logical (...)
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  • Charles S. Peirce, Pioneer of Modern Empiricism.Ernest Nagel - 1940 - Philosophy of Science 7 (1):69-80.
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