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  1. The Fragility of Goodness.Martha Nussbaum - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (7):376-383.
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  • Plato or Protagoras?F. C. S. Schiller - 1908 - Blackwell.
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  • Protagoras on Human Nature, Wisdom, and the Good: The Great Speech and the Hedonism of Plato’s Protagoras.Marina Berzins Mccoy - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):21-39.
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  • Good and Pleasure in the Protagoras.Panos Dimas - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):253-284.
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  • The Strength of Knowledge in Plato’s Protagoras.Justin Clark - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):237-255.
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  • Plato and the Other Companions of Sokrates.George Grote - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Best known for his influential History of Greece, the historian and politician George Grote wrote this account of Plato's dialogues as a philosophical supplement to the History. First published in 1865 and written in dialogic form, Grote's account of Plato's works includes substantial footnotes and marginalia. This first volume focuses on Plato's early and transitional dialogues, all of which feature Socrates. It also includes a preface to the whole project which discusses the meaning and importance of philosophy itself, and extensive (...)
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  • A Commentary on Plato's Protagoras.L. GOLDBERG - 1983 - Peter Lang.
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  • A History of Greek Philosophy: Volume 5, The Later Plato and the Academy.W. K. C. Guthrie - 1962 - Cambridge University Press.
    All volumes of Professor Guthrie's great history of Greek philosophy have won their due acclaim. The most striking merits of Guthrie's work are his mastery of a tremendous range of ancient literature and modern scholarship, his fairness and balance of judgement and the lucidity and precision of his English prose. He has achieved clarity and comprehensiveness.
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  • The Texts of Early Greek Philosophy: The Complete Fragments and Selected Testimonies of the Major Presocratics.Daniel W. Graham (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Part I : cosmologists and ontologists. The sixth century BC ; The fifth century BC -- Part II : Sophists. Protagoras ; Gorgias ; Antiphon ; Prodicus ; Anonymous texts -- Appendix. Pythagoras.
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  • An Examination of Plato's Doctrines: Plato on Man and Society.I. M. CROMBIE - 1962 - New York: Humanities Press.
    ... all probability, Plato's own statement; made indeed to be read by friends in Syracuse in explanation of the role he had played ...
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  • Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life.Daniel Russell - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Daniel Russell develops a fresh and original view of pleasure and its pivotal role in Plato's treatment of value, happiness, and human psychology. This is the first full-length discussion of the topic for fifty years, and Russell shows its relevance to contemporary debates in moral philosophy and philosophical psychology. Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life will make fascinating reading for ancient specialists and for a wide range of philosophers.
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  • Plato’s Ethics.Terence Irwin - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    This exceptional book examines and explains Plato's answer to the normative question, "How ought we to live?" It discusses Plato's conception of the virtues; his views about the connection between the virtues and happiness; and the account of reason, desire, and motivation that underlies his arguments about the virtues. Plato's answer to the epistemological question, "How can we know how we ought to live?" is also discussed. His views on knowledge, belief, and inquiry, and his theory of Forms, are examined, (...)
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  • Plato and the Other Companions of Sokrates.George Grote - 1865 - New York: B. Franklin.
    Volume: 4 Publisher: London J. Murray Publication date: 1888 Subjects: Plato Socrates Philosophy, Ancient Notes: This is an OCR reprint.
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  • Plato: Complete Works.J. Cooper (ed.) - 1997 - Hackett.
    Outstanding translations by leading contemporary scholars--many commissioned especially for this volume--are presented here in the first single edition to include the entire surviving corpus of works attributed to Plato in antiquity. In his introductory essay, John Cooper explains the presentation of these works, discusses questions concerning the chronology of their composition, comments on the dialogue form in which Plato wrote, and offers guidance on approaching the reading and study of Plato's works. Also included are concise introductions by Cooper and Hutchinson (...)
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  • Plato: Protagoras.Paul Woodruff & C. C. W. Taylor - 1978 - Philosophical Review 87 (2):325.
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  • Plato's Protagoras and Explanations of Weakness.Gerasimos Santas - 1966 - Philosophical Review 75 (1):3-33.
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  • Plato: The Man and His Work.Glenn R. Morrow & A. E. Taylor - 1927 - Philosophical Review 36 (5):488.
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  • The Socratic Paradox and its Enemies.Roslyn Weiss - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    In The Socratic Paradox and Its Enemies, Roslyn Weiss argues that the Socratic paradoxes—no one does wrong willingly, virtue is knowledge, and all the virtues are one—are best understood as Socrates’ way of combating sophistic views: ...
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  • Plato's Refutation of Protagoras in the Theaetetus.Gail Fine - 1998 - Apeiron 31 (3):201-34.
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  • Ruling Oneself: Platonic Hedonism and the Quality of Citizenship.R. K. Bentley - 2003 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 20 (1-2):85-107.
    In this paper, I examine how the idea of self-rule is dramatised and articulated in the Protagoras and the Gorgias with respect to the apparently different treatments of hedonism. Looking at the former dialogue, I describe how the hedonist premise develops from a dramatic image of disorder, specifically the absence of self-rule. I then consider whether the evidence from that dialogue has any bearing on the Gorgias’ discussion of hedonism. I conclude that the Socratic rejection of hedonism in that text (...)
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  • Introduction.Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede - 2009 - In Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 1-20.
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  • The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy.Paul B. Woodruff - 1989 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (1):205-210.
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  • Socrates and Hedonism: Protagoras 351b-358d.Donald J. Zeyl - 1980 - Phronesis 25 (3):250-269.
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  • A History of Greek Philosophy.K. W. Harrington - 1978 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (3):431-433.
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  • The Ridiculousness of Being Overcome by Pleasure: Protagoras 352b1–358d4.''.David Wolfsdorf - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 31:113-36.
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  • Knowledge and Hedonism in Plato's Protagoras.M. Dyson - 1976 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 96:32-45.
    The argument in theProtagoraswhich starts with an analysis of giving in to pleasure in terms of ignorance, and leads into a demonstration that courage is knowledge, is certainly one of the most brilliant in Plato and equally certainly one of the trickiest. My discussion deals mainly with three problems: Precisely what absurdity is detected in the popular account of moral weakness, and where is it located in the text? On the basis of largely formal considerations I believe that the absurdity (...)
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  • Consistency and Akrasia in Plato's Protagoras.Raphael Woolf - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (3):224-252.
    Relatively little attention has been paid to Socrates' argument against akrasia in Plato's "Protagoras" as an example of Socratic method. Yet seen from this perspective the argument has some rather unusual features: in particular, the presence of an impersonal interlocutor ("the many") and the absence of the crisp and explicit argumentation that is typical of Socratic elenchus. I want to suggest that these features are problematic, considerably more so than has sometimes been supposed, and to offer a reading of the (...)
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  • Plato’s Moral Theory: The Early and Middle Dialogues.John Robertson - 1981 - Noûs 15 (2):219-225.
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  • Plato’s Ethics.Nicholas White - 1995 - Ethics 107 (1):146-149.
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  • A History of Greek Philosophy.W. K. C. Guthrie - 1969 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 27 (2):214-216.
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  • Plato: The Man and His Work.A. E. Taylor - 1927 - Mind 36 (141):87-98.
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  • Hedonism in Plato's Protagoras.R. Hackforth - 1928 - Classical Quarterly 22 (1):39-42.
    Perhaps the most important contribution to the history of Greek philosophy that has been made during the last twenty years is to be found in the work under-taken by Professors Burnet and A. E. Taylor in reconstructing the personality of the historical Socrates. There is, by this time, fairly general agreement that it is not to Xenophon's Memorabilia but to Plato's dialogues that we must go if we are to attempt to understand what Socrates meant for his own age and (...)
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  • The Structural Unity of the Protagoras.G. M. A. Grube - 1933 - Classical Quarterly 27 (3-4):203-.
    To speak of ‘the real subject’ or ‘the primary aim’ of a Platonic dialogue usually means to magnify one aspect of it at the expense of other aspects as important. Such is not my intention. It is quite clear, however, without prejudice to the philosophic value of any of the topics discussed, that the Protagoras is an attack upon the sophists as represented by Protagoras, the greatest of them. Hippias and Prodicus are present and some of the great man's glory (...)
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  • The Structural Unity of the Protagoras.G. M. A. Grube - 1933 - Classical Quarterly 27 (3-4):203-207.
    To speak of ‘the real subject’ or ‘the primary aim’ of a Platonic dialogue usually means to magnify one aspect of it at the expense of other aspects as important. Such is not my intention. It is quite clear, however, without prejudice to the philosophic value of any of the topics discussed, that the Protagoras is an attack upon the sophists as represented by Protagoras, the greatest of them. Hippias and Prodicus are present and some of the great man's glory (...)
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  • Protagoras' Doctrine of Justice and Virtue in the ‘Protagoras’ of Plato.G. B. Kerferd - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:42-45.
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  • Courage in Plato's "Protagoras".Roger Duncan - 1978 - Phronesis 23 (3):216 - 228.
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  • Socrates and Hedonism: Protagoras 351b-358d.Donald J. Zeyl - 1980 - Phronesis 25 (3):250 - 269.
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  • The Hedonism in Plato's Protagoras.J. P. Sullivan - 1961 - Phronesis 6 (1):10 - 28.
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  • The Hedonism in Plato's Protagoras.J. P. Sullivan - 1961 - Phronesis 6 (1):10-28.
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  • Plato or Protagoras?F. C. S. Schiller - 1908 - Mind 17 (4):518-526.
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  • Hedonism in the Protagoras.Alexander Sesonske - 1963 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 1 (1):73-79.
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  • Plato: Protagoras.C. C. W. Taylor - 1978 - Mind 87 (346):276-277.
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  • Heracleitean Flux in Plato's "Theaetetus".Naomi Reshotko - 1994 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (2):139 - 161.
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  • Ruling Oneself: Platonic Hedonism and the Quality of Citizenship.R. K. Bentley - 2003 - Polis 20 (1-2):85-107.
    In this paper, I examine how the idea of self-rule is dramatised and articulated in the Protagoras and the Gorgias with respect to the apparently different treatments of hedonism. Looking at the former dialogue, I describe how the hedonist premise develops from a dramatic image of disorder, specifically the absence of self-rule. I then consider whether the evidence from that dialogue has any bearing on the Gorgias' discussion of hedonism. I conclude that the Socratic rejection of hedonism in that text (...)
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  • Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life.Richard D. Parry - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):688-689.
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  • The Hedonic Calculus in the Protagoras and the Phaedo.Roslyn Weiss - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (4):511-529.
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  • Introduction.Myles Burnyeat - 2009 - In BernardHG Williams (ed.), The Sense of the Past: Essays in the History of Philosophy. Princeton University Press.
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  • Plato's Moral Theory.Terence Irwin - 1979 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 33 (2):311-313.
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  • Plato: Gorgias.I. G. Kidd & E. R. Dodds - 1961 - Philosophical Quarterly 11 (42):79.
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