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John Gibson
University of Louisville
  1. Cognitivism and the Arts.John Gibson - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (4):573-589.
    Cognitivism in respect to the arts refers to a constellation of positions that share in common the idea that artworks often bear, in addition to aesthetic value, a significant kind of cognitive value. In this paper I concentrate on three things: (i) the challenge of understanding exactly what one must do if one wishes to defend a cognitivist view of the arts; (ii) common anti-cognitivist arguments; and (iii) promising recent attempts to defend cognitivism.
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  2. Lyric Self-Expression.Hannah H. Kim & John Gibson - 2021 - In Sonia Sedivy (ed.), Art, Representation and Make-Believe: The Philosophy of Kendall Walton.
    Philosophers ask just whose expression, if anyone’s, we hear in lyric poetry. Walton provides a novel possibility: it’s the reader who “uses” the poem (just as a speech giver uses a speech) who makes the language expressive. But worries arise once we consider poems in particular social or political settings, those which require a strong self-other distinction, or those with expressions that should not be disassociated from the subjects whose experience they draw from. One way to meet this challenge is (...)
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  3. Really Boring Art.Andreas Elpidorou & John Gibson - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    There is little question as to whether there is good boring art, though its existence raises a number of questions for both the philosophy of art and the philosophy of emotions. How can boredom ever be a desideratum of art? How can our standing commitments concerning the nature of aesthetic experience and artistic value accommodate the existence of boring art? How can being bored constitute an appropriate mode of engagement with a work of art as a work of art? More (...)
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  4. Between Truth and Triviality.John Gibson - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):224-237.
    A viable theory of literary humanism must do justice to the idea that literature offers cognitive rewards to the careful reader. There are, however, powerful arguments to the effect that literature is at best only capable of offering idle visions of a world already well known. In this essay I argue that there is a form of cognitive awareness left unmentioned in the traditional vocabulary of knowledge acquisition, a form of awareness literature is particularly capable of offering. Thus even if (...)
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  5. Literature and Knowledge.John Gibson - 2009 - In Richard Eldridge (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press.
    What is the relation between works of fiction and the acquisition of knowledge?
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  6. What Makes a Poem Philosophical?John Gibson - 2018 - In Karen Zumhagen-Yekplé & Michael LeMahieu (eds.), Wittgenstein and Modernism. Chicago, IL, USA: University of Chicago Press. pp. 130-152.
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  7. Empathy.John Gibson - 2015 - In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge. pp. 200-219.
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  8. Interpreting Words, Interpreting Worlds.John Gibson - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):439–450.
    It is often assumed that literary meaning is essentially linguistic in nature and that literary interpretation is therefore a purely linguistic affair. This essay identifies a variety of literary meaning that cannot be reduced to linguistic meaning. Meaning of this sort is generated not by a communicative act so much as through a creative one: the construction of a fictional world. The way in which a fictional world can bear meaning turns out to be strikingly unlike the way a sentence (...)
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  9. An Aesthetics of Insight.John Gibson - 2019 - In Beauty: New Essays in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Munich, Germany: pp. 277-306.
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  10. On the Ethical Character of Literature.John Gibson - 2018 - In Espen Hammer (ed.), Kafka's The Trial: Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 85-110.
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  11. Thick Narratives.John Gibson - 2011 - In John Gibson & Noel Carroll (eds.), Narrative, Emotion, and Insight. PSUP. pp. 69.
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  12. The Question of Poetic Meaning.John Gibson - 2011 - Nonsite (4).
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  13. Introduction: The Place of Poetry in Contemporary Aesthetics.John Gibson - 2015 - In The Philosophy of Poetry. Oxford University Press. pp. 1-16.
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  14. A Puzzle of Poetic Expression.John Gibson - 2016 - The Philosophers' Magazine 74 (3):56-62.
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  15. Narrative and the Literary Imagination.John Gibson - 2014 - In Allen Speight (ed.), Narrative, Philosophy & Life. Springer. pp. 135-50.
    This paper attempts to reconcile two apparently opposed ways of thinking about the imagination and its relationship to literature, one which casts it as essentially concerned with fiction-making and the other with culture-making. The literary imagination’s power to create fictions is what gives it its most obvious claim to “autonomy”, as Kant would have it: its freedom to venture out in often wild and spectacular excess of reality. The argument of this paper is that we can locate the literary imagination’s (...)
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  16. Skepticism and the Idea of an Other.John Gibson & Simona Bertacco - 2011 - In Bernie Rhei (ed.), Stanley Cavell and Literary Theory: Consequences of Skepticism. Continuum.
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  17. Interpretation, Literature and Meaning Skepticism.John Gibson - 2016 - In Dirk-Martin Grube (ed.), Meaning and Interpretation. Brill.
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  18. What Do Humanists Want?John Gibson - 2013 - In P. Hanna (ed.), Reality and Culture: Essays on the Philosophy of Bernard Harrison. Rodopi.
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  19. Zombie Philosophy.John Gibson - 2014 - In Edward P. Comentale & Aaron Jaffe (eds.), The Year's Work at the Zombie Research Center. Bloomington, IN, USA: pp. 416-436.
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  20. Representation and the Novel.John Gibson - 2013 - The Henry James Review 34 (3):220-231.
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  21. On (Not) Making Oneself Known.John Gibson - 2018 - In Tzachi Zamir (ed.), Shakespeare's Hamlet: Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford, UK: pp. 17-45.
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  22. Professor.John Gibson - forthcoming - In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. Routledge.
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  23. Interpretation, Sincerity and "Theory".John Gibson - 2010 - Contemporary Aesthetics 8.
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