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Nicholas H Smith
University of Connecticut
  1.  57
    Three normative models of work.Nicholas H. Smith - 2012 - In Nicholas H. Smith & Jean-Philippe Deranty (eds.), New Philosophies of Labour: Work and the Social Bond. Brill. pp. 181-206.
    I suggest that the post-Hegelian tradition presents us with three contrasting normative models of work. According to the first model, the core norms of work are those of means-ends rationality. In this model, the modern world of work is constitutively a matter of deploying the most effective means to bring about given ends. The rational kernel of modern work, the core norm that has shaped its development, is on this view instrumental reason, and this very same normative core, in the (...)
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  2.  38
    social freedom as the purpose of the modern university.Nicholas H. Smith & Shane O'Neill - 2022 - Philosophy and Theory in Higher Education 4 (1):1-23.
    What is the fundamental purpose that justifies the existence of the modern university? The answer proposed in this essay is the promotion of social freedom. The essay begins by distinguishing social freedom from negative freedom and reflective freedom along the lines proposed by other theorists of social freedom, such as Frederick Neuhouser and Axel Honneth. After noting the need for a more developed account of the university than has so far been provided by these other theorists, the essay analyses the (...)
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  3. Basic income, social freedom and the fabric of justice.Nicholas H. Smith - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (6).
    This paper examines the justice of unconditional basic income (UBI) through the lens of the Hegel-inspired recognition-theory of justice. As explained in the first part of the paper, this theory takes everyday social roles to be the primary subject-matter of the theory of justice, and it takes justice in these roles to be a matter of the kind of freedom that is available through their performance, namely ‘social’ freedom. The paper then identifies the key criteria of social freedom. The extent (...)
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  4.  50
    Die Armut unserer Freiheit. Axel Honneth Suhrkamp Verlag, 2020. [REVIEW]Nicholas H. Smith - 2022 - Constellations (Online first):507-509.
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  5. Work as a Realm of Social Freedom.Nicholas H. Smith - 2022 - In K. Breen and J.-P. Deranty (ed.), The Politics and Ethics of Contemporary Work. New York, NY, USA: pp. 16-31.
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  6.  66
    Expressivism in Brandom and Taylor.Nicholas H. Smith - 2010 - In James Williams, James Chase, Jack Reynolds & Edwin Mares (eds.), Postanalytic and Metacontinental: Crossing Philosophical Divides. Continuum. pp. 145--156.
    I begin by picking up on Brandom’s suggestion that expressivism follows American pragmatism in seeking to advance the cause of the Enlightenment. This provides us with a first point of contrast with Taylor’s understanding of expressivism, since Taylor takes expressivism to be inseparably bound up with the Romantic critique of the Enlightenment and as fundamentally opposed to Enlightenment naturalism. I then distinguish two features of what we ordinarily mean by the term ‘expression’, one of which provides an intuitive basis for (...)
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  7.  13
    Taylor and Liberal Naturalism.Nicholas H. Smith - 2022 - In The Handbook of Liberal Naturalism. pp. Ch 19.
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  8. Hermeneutics and Critical Theory.Nicholas H. Smith - 2015 - In J. Malpas and H. Gander (ed.), Routledge Companion to Philosophical Hermeneutics. London, UK: pp. 600-611.
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  9. Arendt's anti-humanism of labour.Nicholas H. Smith - 2019 - European Journal of Social Theory 2 (22):175-190.
    The aim of this article is to situate Arendt’s account of labour as a critical response to humanisms of labour, or put otherwise, to situate it as an anti-humanism of labour. It compares Arendt’s account of labour with that of the most prominent humanist theorist of labour at the time of the composition of The Human Condition: Georges Friedmann. Arendt’s and Friedmann’s accounts of labour are compared specifically with respect to the range of capacities, social relations, and possibilities of fulfilment (...)
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  10.  28
    A Culture of Egotism: Rorty and Higher Education.Tracy Llanera & Nicholas H. Smith - 2021 - In A. Mahon (ed.), The Promise of the University: Reclaiming Humanity, Humility and Hope. Singapore: pp. 55-66.
    This chapter takes a critical look at universities from the perspective of the neopragmatist philosophy of education outlined by Richard Rorty. The chapter begins with a discussion of Rorty’s view of the ends that educational institutions properly serve in a liberal democracy. It then considers the kind of culture that Rorty takes to be conducive to those ends and the kind that is antithetical to them. Rorty sometimes characterizes the latter as a culture of ‘egotism’. After describing the main aspects (...)
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  11.  7
    A Philosopher Looks at Work by Raymond Geuss. [REVIEW]Nicholas H. Smith - 2021 - Australian Book Review 437:55.
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  12.  61
    Work as a sphere of norms, paradoxes, and ideologies of recognition.Nicholas H. Smith - 2012 - In Shane O'Neill & Nicholas H. Smith (eds.), Recognition Theory as Social Research: Investigating the Dynamics of Social Conflict. Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 87-108.
    An analysis of how the sphere of work can be considered to instantiate norms of recognition, even when those norms give rise to paradoxes and ideologies surrounding how work ought to be done and the goods at stake in it.
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  13.  82
    Recognition, culture and economy : Honneth’s debate with Fraser.Nicholas H. Smith - 2011 - In Danielle Petherbridge (ed.), Axel Honneth: Critical Essays with a Reply by Axel Honneth. Leiden: Brill. pp. 321-344.
    Although the contrast between ‘economy’ and culture’ that structures the Fraser-Honneth debate derives ultimately from Weber, it has a more proximate ancestry in Habermas’ work. I begin by glancing back at Habermas’ formulation, not just because its background role in shaping the current debate has not been properly acknowledged (though I believe that is the case), but because Fraser and Honneth’s original responses to it provide a nice segue into their current positions. After briefly reviewing what those responses were, I (...)
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  14.  89
    Introduction : a recognition-theoretical research programme in the social sciences.Nicholas H. Smith - 2012 - In Shane O'Neill & Nicholas H. Smith (eds.), Recognition Theory as Social Research: Investigating the Dynamics of Social Conflict. Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 1-18.
    A summary of the main features of a 'recognition-theoretic' research program in the social sciences and a brief account of how it promises to advance on rival research programs in the social sciences.
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  15.  38
    Language, work and hermeneutics.Nicholas H. Smith - 2011 - In Gadamer’s Hermeneutics and the Art of Conversation. LIT Verlag. pp. 201-220.
    The essay reflects on Gadamer’s ambiguous legacy for the philosophy of work. On the one hand, there are times when Gadamer reproduces the problematic distinction between language and labor which short-circuits the very idea of a hermeneutics of work. This is particularly evident in Gadamer’s reflections on technique and craftsmanship in the central sections of Truth and Method, as well as in his descriptions of the “art” of dialogue and the tasks of hermeneutics that separate them emphatically them from the (...)
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