Results for 'Refugees'

101 found
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  1. The Refugee Crisis & The Responsibility Of Intellectuals.Alex Sager - 2016 - The Critique.
    According to the UN, 65.3 million forcibly displaced people languish in camps and slums or making desperate journeys toward safety. The global community has not only failed to help many of these people; in many cases it has actively obstructed them from finding security and a new home for themselves and their families. Moral responsibilities to refugees are not exhausted by policies and actions. They also extend to how to think about the refugee crisis. Pundits, politicians, and political philosophers (...)
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  2. Refugees, Exiles, and Stoic Cosmopolitanism.William O. Stephens - 2018 - Journal of Religion and Society 16:73-91.
    The Roman imperial Stoics were familiar with exile. This paper argues that the Stoics’ view of being a refugee differed sharply from their view of what is owed to refugees. A Stoic adopts the perspective of a cosmopolitēs, a “citizen of the world,” a rational being everywhere at home in the universe. Virtue can be cultivated and practiced in any locale, so being a refugee is an “indifferent” that poses no obstacle to happiness. Other people are our fellow cosmic (...)
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  3. Refugees, Stoicism, and Cosmic Citizenship.William O. Stephens - 2020 - Pallas: Revue d'Etudes Antiques 112:289-307.
    The Roman imperial Stoics were familiar with exile. I argue that the Stoics’ view of being a refugee differed sharply from their view of what is owed to refugees. A Stoic adopts the perspective of a cosmopolitēs, a ‘citizen of the world’, a rational being everywhere at home in the universe. Virtue can be cultivated and practiced in any locale, so being a refugee is an ‘indifferent’ that poses no obstacle to happiness. But other people are our fellow cosmic (...)
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  4.  60
    Past and present experiences of "natality" in border crossing. An Arendtian reading of the agency and rights of refugees.Paolo Monti & Anna Granata - 2023 - J-Reading 2023 (1):97-110.
    Recent crises in Europe and beyond have renewed a longstanding debate on the status and treatment of refugees. Hannah Arendt famously questioned the limits of universalistic human rights discourse based on the widespread phenomena of statelessness and displacement that emerged during and after World War II. In this paper, we analyze recent patterns of inclusion and exclusion of refugees in Italy through the lens of Arendtian narrative and theorizing. We consider three cases of interaction between families, schools, and (...)
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  5.  15
    Those Fleeing States Destroyed by Climate Change Are Convention Refugees.Heather Alexander & Jonathan A. Simon - 2023 - Biblioteca Della Libertà 2023 (237):63-96.
    Multiple states are at risk of becoming uninhabitable due to climate change, forcing their populations to flee. While the 1951 Refugee Convention provides the gold standard of international protection, it is only applied to a limited subset of people fleeing their countries, those who suffer persecution, which most people fleeing climate change cannot establish. While many journalists and non-lawyers freely use the term “climate refugees,” governments, and courts, as well as UNHCR and many refugee experts, have excluded most climate (...)
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  6. Moral responsibilities towards refugees. Ethical Annotation #2.Jos Philips, Jacobi Suzanne, Samuel Mulkens, Natascha Rietdijk & Dick Timmer - 2023 - Ethical Annotation.
    Wars and crises worldwide force millions of people to flee and seek refuge, often outside their countries of origin. What moral responsibilities do states have towards refugees? In this Ethical Annotation, Dr Jos Philips and his co-authors zoom in on the responsibilities of EU countries. They consider arguments in favour of and against admitting refugees and argue that EU countries must do at least at much as they can do at little cost, and perhaps even more.
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  7. Refugee, Migrant and Human Rights Crisis in Africa: The Libyan Experience.Francisca Dr Ifedi & Kingsley Ezechi - 2019 - International Journal of Academic Multidisciplinary Research (IJAMR) 3 (5):8-15.
    Abstract: The refugee, migrant and human rights crisis ravaging the African continent through the Libyan coast is one that is self-inflicted, due in part and primarily so, a result of bad governance on the part of the African leaders who have not made the management and welfare of her citizens a primary and a going concern. Ethnic conflict and wars on resource control have also led to the forceful migration of some of these citizens from their homes. Thus, having been (...)
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  8. Determining the Number of Refugees to Be Resettled in the United States: An Ethical and Policy Analysis of Policy-Level Stakeholder Views.Rachel Fabi, Daniel Serwer, Namrita S. Singh, Govind Persad, Paul Spiegel & Leonard Rubenstein - 2021 - Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies 19 (2):142-156.
    Through engagement with key informants and review of ethical theories applicable to refugee policy, this paper examines the ethical and policy considerations that policy-level stakeholders believe should factor into setting the refugee resettlement ceiling. We find that the ceiling traditionally has been influenced by policy goals, underlying values, and practical considerations. These factors map onto several ethical approaches to resettlement. There is significant alignment between U.S. policy interests and ethical obligations toward refugees. We argue that the refugee ceiling should (...)
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  9. Refugees, Development and Autocracies: On What Repairs the State System's Legitimacy.Felix Bender - 2021 - Ethical Perspectives 28 (3):356-361.
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  10. Righting domestic wrongs with refugee policy.Matthew Lindauer - 2024 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 27 (2):206-223.
    Discriminatory attitudes towards Muslim refugees are common in liberal democracies, and Muslim citizens of these countries experience high rates of discrimination and social exclusion. Uniting these two facts is the well-known phenomenon of Islamophobia. But the implications of overlapping discrimination against citizens and non-citizens have not been given sustained attention in the ethics of immigration literature. In this paper, I argue that liberal societies have not only duties to discontinue refugee policies that discriminate against social groups like Muslims, but (...)
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  11. Our Responsibilities to Refugees.David Miller - 2019 - Proceedings of the 2018 ZiF Workshop “Studying Migration Policies at the Interface Between Empirical Research and Normative Analysisandquot;.
    The paper explores the basis of the responsibilities we owe to refugees. That we have such responsibilities is a very widely shared intuition: the need of those fleeing from persecution seems to call out for a response on our part. But what exactly are our obligations to such people? Who are they owed to and why do we have them? The paper argues in favour of a human rights approach to refugee protection that includes the requirement of the implementation (...)
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  12. An institutional right of refugee return.Andy Lamey - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (4):948-964.
    Calls to recognize a right of return are a recurring feature of refugee crises. Particularly when such crises become long-term, advocates of displaced people insist that they be allowed to return to their country of origin. I argue that this right is best understood as the right of refugees to return, not to a prior territory, but to a prior political status. This status is one that sees not just any state, but a refugee's state of origin, take responsibility (...)
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  13. Why Haitian Refugee Patients Need Trauma-Informed Care.Woodger G. Faugas - 2022 - Synapse 66 (8).
    Owing to its grappling with a motley of intricate socioeconomic, as well as medico-legal, crises, Haiti has found itself bereft of some of its people, many of whom have had to leave the Caribbean country in search of improved lives elsewhere. Receiving some of the Haitian refugees fleeing abject poverty, unemployment, and other harms and barriers has been the United States, one of Haiti's northern neighbors and a country that has played an outcome-determinative, if not outsized, role in steering (...)
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  14. Non-Human Climate Refugees: The Role that Urban Communities Should Play in Ensuring Ecological Resilience.Samantha Noll - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (2):119-134.
    Urban residents have the potential to play a key role in helping to facilitate ecological resilience of wilderness areas and ecosystems beyond the city by helping ensure the migration of nonhuman climate refugee populations. Three ethical frameworks related to this issue could determine whether we have an ethical duty to help nonhuman climate refugee populations: ethical individualism, ethical holism, and species ethics. Using each of these frameworks could support the stronger view that policy makers and members of the public have (...)
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  15.  95
    Building a Fair Future: Transforming Immigration Policy for Refugees and Families.Matthew J. Lister - 2024 - In Matteo Bonotti & Narelle Miragliotta (eds.), Australian Politics at a Crossroads: Prospects for Change. Routledge. pp. 149-16`.
    In this chapter I focus on two problems facing immigration systems around the world, and Australia in particular. The topics addressed are chosen because each one involves important fundamental rights and because significant improvement in these areas is possible even if each state acts alone, without significant coordination with others. First, I examine refugee programmes, focussing specifically on the ‘two- tier’ refugee programmes pioneered by Australia with the introduction of Temporary Protection Visas by the Howard Government in 1999. Next, I (...)
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  16. Forced Labour and Access to Education of Rohingya Refugee Children in Bangladesh: Beyond a Humanitarian Crisis.Md Mahmudul Hoque - 2021 - Journal of Modern Slavery 6 (3):19-33.
    Rohingya refugee children in Bangladesh are forced into labour both inside and outside the camps for a wide range of reasons. This article examines this situation in relation to the access to education for those children living in the camps in Cox’s Bazar. Being informed by several perspectives concerning child labour and access to schooling in developing country contexts, this research work has adopted a qualitative approach to study various factors working behind this pressing issue. After collecting data by means (...)
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  17. International Migrants and Refugees in Cape Town’s Informal Economy.Godfrey Tawodzera, Abel Chikanda, Jonathan Crush & Robertson K. Tengeh - 2015 - Waterloo, ON, Canada: Southern African Migration Programme.
    Attacks on migrant and refugee entrepreneurs and their properties by South African rivals and ordinary citizens have become a common phenomenon throughout the country, including the city of Cape Town. Business robberies often result in deaths or serious injuries. The Somali Community Board has noted that over 400 Somali refugees, many of them informal traders, were murdered in South Africa between early 2002 and mid-2010. The police are frequently accused by migrants of fomenting or turning a blind eye to (...)
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  18. Adaptive reuse of abandoned buildings for refugees: lessons from European context.Haniye Razavivand & Asma Mehan - 2018 - Suspended Living in Temporary Space: Emergencies in the Mediterranean Region.
    The ongoing refugee crisis is described as the most important concern since the Second World War, which has caused a great displacement of people. Many of these immigrants have been departing towards Mediterranean countries, as first-line states, seeking for a chance to enter Europe. This situation has created a challenging condition for many refugee accepting cities as well as for the migrants to get integrated within the new society. This fact has had a great influence on the sustainability condition while (...)
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  19. The Challenge of Educating Refugee Children to Avoid Creating Tomorrow’s Extremists.Stephan Urs Breu - 2019 - In Craig Paterson & Stephan U. Breu (eds.), Law, Ethics and Society: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Miami, Florida, USA: JHPU Press. pp. 55 - 66.
    An estimated 65 million people have been forced to flee their homelands in the last few years. Average length of displacement for a refugee is now estimated at 17 years. A whole generation of young people are forced to spend their whole youth in refugee camps and can only be educated there. On the other side the international community is strongly underfinancing any education efforts by aid agencies and international organizations. So, it is common that classes have as many as (...)
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  20. Transitional Justice and the Right of Return of the Palestinian Refugees.Nadim N. Rouhana & Yoav Peled - 2004 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 5 (2):317-332.
    All efforts undertaken so far to establish peace between Israel and the Palestinians have failed to seriously address the right of return of the Palestinian refugees. This failure stemmed from a conviction that the question of historical justice in general had to be avoided. Since justice is a subjective construct, it was argued, allowing it to become a subject of negotiation would only perpetuate the conflict. However, the experience of these peace efforts has shown that without solving the problem (...)
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  21. The Religious Response to Migration and Refugee Crises in Cross River State, Nigeria.Emmanuel Williams Udoh - 2018 - FAHSANU Journal 1 (2).
    The movement of people from one country to another in search of greener pasture, peaceful settlement and so on, has become very rampant in the world today. These same reasons have triggered internal migrations as well. Lives have been lost in the bid to circumvent immigration laws of countries by immigrants. The current spate of wars, political crises, natural disasters and hunger has led to increase in illegal migration in the world. Nigeria is not left out. We hear of boundary (...)
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  22. Doing and Allowing Harm to Refugees.Bradley Hillier-Smith - 2020 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 18 (3).
    Most theorists working on moral obligations to refugees conceive of western states as innocent bystanders with duties to aid refugees if they can do so at little cost to themselves. This paper challenges this dominant theoretical framing of global displacement by highlighting for the first time certain practices of western states in response to refugee flows such as border violence, detention, encampment and containment which may make us question whether states who engage in such practices are indeed innocent. (...)
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  23. Does a State’s Right to Control Borders Justify Harming Refugees?Bradley Hillier-Smith - forthcoming - Moral Philosophy and Politics.
    Certain states in the Global North have responded to refugees seeking safety on their territories through harmful practices of border violence, detention, encampment and containment that serve to prevent and deter refugee arrivals. These practices are ostensibly justified through an appeal to a right to control borders. This paper therefore assesses whether these harmful practices can indeed be morally justified by a state’s right to control borders. It analyses whether Christopher Heath Wellman’s account of a state’s right to freedom (...)
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  24. The Idealised Subject of Freedom and the Refugee.Shahin Nasiri (ed.) - 2023 - London: Routledge.
    As with terms such as “human rights”, “democracy”, and “equality”, the notion of “freedom” has an emblematic character with highly normative overtones. After the declaration of universal human rights, one might argue that freedom is – at least formally – a universal entitlement belonging to every human being. However, this universalist structure is built upon a conflictual foundation, as the juridico-political meaning of freedom is determined by the boundaries of national citizenship, statehood, and territorial sovereignty. This chapter examines refugeehood as (...)
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  25. The United States is Obligated to Take All Refugees of a Kind.Stan Lovelace - manuscript
    A Hobbesian Realist position concerning Nation States and their generative grounds in the Social Contract obligates the United States to accept any and all refugees of conflict who are willing to recognize the sovereign power of the United States by submitting to citizenship requirements determined by the United States.
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  26. Direct and structural injustice against refugees.Bradley Hillier-Smith - 2023 - Journal of Social Philosophy 54 (2):262-284.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  27. softening Australia's Position on Refugees.Peter Bowden - 2016 - Http://Onlineopinion.Com.Au/View.Asp?Article=18555.
    This article argues that the many reasons for softening Australia’s position on refugees are idealistic, humanitarian, legal, practical and economic .The idealistic reasons are that Australia, already with a high percentage of its people with an immigrant background , could demonstrate the ability of the many different races of world to live together without excessive conflict.
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  28. A Use of Nozick’s Notion of Catastrophe: The Distributive Justice Problem of Environmental Refugees.Justin P. Holt - 2021 - Academia Letters 1061 (1061):1-5.
    This paper will focus on the problem of environmental refugees related to environmental decay and resource loss. Robert Nozick’s distributive justice theory will be used as a theoretical framework to analyze the problem of environmental refugees. The restrictive nature of Nozick’s theory of distribution is rather practical since it meets with many of the current mores regarding wealth accumulation, desert, and aspirations for inheritance. Given our current reluctance to redistribute to prevent the effects of environmental decay, and to (...)
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  29. BORDERS: The attitudes of students at the University of Split on immigration, immigrants, and refugees.Marita Brčić Kuljiš, Toni Popović, Renata Relja & Anita Lunic - 2021 - Split: Sveučilište u Splitu, Filozofski fakultet.
    Migration has, in recent years, been one of the most current topics both in Croatia and worldwide. We have witnessed increased emigration (i.e. out-migration) of Croatian citizens, as well as attempts to cross the Croatian state border by citizens of other countries. This book focuses on migration in the context of the so-called migrant and refugee crisis, which is considered from a philosophical and sociological perspective. Any gender-specific terms, irrespective of the gender in which they are used here, refer equally (...)
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  30. SOCIAL RECEPTION AND INCLUSION OF REFUGEES FROM UKRAINE.Jakub Isański, Marek Nowak, Michał A. Michalski, Victoria Sereda & Hanna Vakhitova - manuscript
    Our research aimed to study the ongoing phenomena of cross-border displacement of the Ukrainian population resulting from the Russian aggression that started on the 24th of February 2022. In the first stage of this research, we managed to get the opinions of over 500 refugees with a focus on their needs, concerns, plans, and expectations. Collected data also allowed a reconstruction of social-demographic profiles of fleeing Ukrainian refugees. The preliminary outcomes are presented in the report.
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  31.  65
    Analyzing the Transformation of The Concept of "Mobility" Depending on Refugee Problems via Design Competitions.Serkan Can Hatıpoğlu - 2019 - Livenarch Vi: Replacing Architecture 3:963-975.
    Interaction with the environment occurs in the perception of movement. Movement is the basic concept of mobility. Development and diversification (i.e., faster transportations, new technological access, etc.) of movement concepts may contribute modern people to become independent of any place. Nomadic cultures constitute the basic principles of mobile architecture with light, portable materials and flexible constructions. In the industrial age, futurist manifesto announced machine-housing concepts. The mechanized perception of the spaces prepared ground for mobilization. Mobility, as a source of independence (...)
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  32. Rethinking freedom from the perspective of refugees: Lived experiences of (un)freedom in Europe’s border zones.Nasiri Shahin - 2023 - Dissertation, University of Amsterdam
    In mainstream political discourse, refugeehood is increasingly being associated with victimhood, powerlessness, abnormality, and political crises. On the one hand, refugees are, often, viewed as voiceless victims who should be offered protection and assistance on humanitarian grounds under exceptional circumstances. On the other hand, they are, increasingly, being portrayed as enemy-like strangers who pose a threat to the borders, stability of receiving states, and the well-being of their citizens. This prevailing framework fundamentally disregards refugees’ political subjectivity and ignores (...)
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  33. Structural Injustice and Socially Undocumented Oppression: Changing Tides in Refugee and Immigration Ethics. [REVIEW]Lukas Schmid - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (4):1047-1052.
    In this review essay, I discuss two recent works in refugee and migration ethics, Serena Parekh’s No Refuge: Ethics and the Global Refugee Crisis and Amy Reed-Sandoval’s Socially Undocumented: Identity and Immigration Justice. I find that their methodological ambitions overlap significantly and that their arguments represent welcome and largely successful examinations of generally neglected issues. I also explain how both approaches could fruitfully learn from each other, and argue that they lay pioneering groundwork for future work to continue the analysis (...)
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  34. The humanitarian assistance dilemma explained: the implications of the refugee crisis in Tanzania in 1994.Wen Chin Lung Ruamps - 2019 - Global Change, Peace and Security 31 (3):323-340.
    Despite the good intention of humanitarian agencies, humanitarian assistance and relief aid exacerbated the humanitarian crisis in Tanzania during 1994. In the case of Tanzania, humanitarian assistance relieved belligerents’ burden of sustaining conflicts, created safe spaces for armed combatants, undermined local economies, bestowed legitimacy upon belligerents, and fed armed combatants. This situation hence posed the typical humanitarian assistance dilemma for humanitarian agencies. While most scholars and aid practitioners suggest that humanitarian agencies should withdraw their assistance in these contexts given aid’s (...)
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  35. A liberal theory of asylum.Andy Lamey - 2012 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (3):235-257.
    Hannah Arendt argued that refugees pose a major problem for liberalism. Most liberal theorists endorse the idea of human rights. At the same time, liberalism takes the existence of sovereign states for granted. When large numbers of people petition a liberal state for asylum, Arendt argued, these two commitments will come into conflict. An unwavering respect for human rights would mean that no refugee is ever turned away. Being sovereign, however, allows states to control their borders. States supposedly committed (...)
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  36. Philosophical Foundations for Complementary Protection.Matthew J. Lister - 2019 - In David Miller & Christine Straehle (eds.), The Political Philosophy of Refuge. Cambridge University Press. pp. 211-231.
    A Significant percentage of the people outside their country of citizenship or residence who are unable to meet their basic needs on their own, and need international protection, do not fall under the definition set out in the UN Refugee Convention. This has led many - both academic commentators and activists - to call for a new, expanded refugee definition, preferably backed up by a new, binding, international convention. In earlier work I have resisted this call, arguing that there is (...)
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  37. Climate change and displacement: Towards a pluralist approach.Jamie Draper - 2024 - European Journal of Political Theory 23 (1):44-64.
    This paper sets out a research agenda for a political theory of climate displacement, by critically examining one prominent proposal—the idea of a normative status for ‘climate refugees’—and by proposing an alternative. Drawing on empirical work on climate displacement, I show that the concept of the climate refugee obscures the complexity and heterogeneity of climate displacement. I argue that, because of this complexity and heterogeneity, approaches to climate displacement that put the concept of the climate refugee at their centre (...)
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  38. Laments of an Immigrant Ashore.Suleman Lazarus - 2021 - Lothlorien Poetry Journal 4:1-2.
    The poem gives a voice to many refugees who died crossing borders and many more asylum seekers who will lose their lives crossing international borders.
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  39. Can There be a Right of Return?Andy Lamey - 2020 - Journal of Refugee Studies 33:1-12.
    During long-term refugee displacements, it is common for the refugees’ country of origin to be called on to recognize a right of return. A long-standing tradition of philosophical theorizing is sceptical of such a right. Howard Adelman and Elazar Barkan are contemporary proponents of this view. They argue that, in many cases, it is not feasible for entire refugee populations to return home, and so the notion of a right of return is no right at all. We can call (...)
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  40. Virtue after Foucault: On refuge and integration in Western Europe.Muhammad Ali Nasir - 2023 - European Journal of Political Theory 22 (1).
    I suggest that virtue ethics can learn from Foucault’s critical observations on biopolitics and governmentality, which identify how a good cannot be disassociated from power and freedom. I chart a way through which virtue ethics internalizes this critical point. I argue that this helps address concerns that both virtue ethics and the critical scholarship inspired by Foucault otherwise ignore. I apply virtue ethics to the contexts of refugee arrival, asylum procedure, and immigrant integration in Western Europe; I then see how (...)
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  41. Sanctuary After Asylum: Addressing a Gap in The Political Theory of Refuge.Samuel Ritholtz & Rebecca Buxton - forthcoming - American Political Science Review.
    This research note argues that political theorists of refuge ought to consider the experiences of refugees after they have received asylum in the Global North. Currently, much of the literature concerning the duties of states towards refugees implicitly adopts a blanket approach, rather than considering how varied identities may affect the remedies available to displaced people. Given the prevalence of racism, xenophobia, and homophobia in the Global North, and the growing norm of dissident persecution in foreign territory, protection (...)
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  42. Nous autres réfugiés. Hannah Arendt. París: Allia, 2019, 43 pp. [REVIEW]Facundo Bey - 2022 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 37:297-303.
    Nous autres réfugiés [We refugees], is the title of a brief but disruptive essay that in January 1943, at 37 years old, Hannah Arendt [1906-1975] published in the American Jewish magazine The Menorah Journal (Arendt, 1943). The article —which has an obvious autobiographical connotation, although how much existential reflection that is positioned from the point of the refugee's point of view cannot be reduced solely to this dimension—was posthumously reprinted in The Jew as Pariah, edited by Ron H. Feldman (...)
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  43. Global justice: an anti-collectivist and pro-causal ethic.James Franklin - 2012 - Solidarity 2 (1).
    Both philosophical and practical analyses of global justice issues have been vitiated by two errors: a too-high emphasis on the supposed duties of collectives to act, and a too-low emphasis on the analysis of causes and risks. Concentrating instead on the duties of individual actors and analysing what they can really achieve reconfigures the field. It diverts attention from individual problems such as poverty or refugees or questions on what states should do. Instead it shows that there are different (...)
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  44. What Do We Owe The Forcibly Displaced? [REVIEW]José Jorge Mendoza - 2018 - Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric 11 (1).
    This is a review of Serena Parekh's book: Refugees and the Ethics of Forced Displacement.
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  45. An unstable environment: The economic case for getting asylum decisions right first time.Marie Oldfield - 2022 - Pro Bono Economics 1 (1).
    Marie Oldfield, Pro Bono Economics & Refugee Council. Over half the total applications for asylum the UK receives each year are initially rejected, yet nearly a third of these initial rejections are subsequently overturned on appeal. This process that fails to get decisions right first time imposes significant costs, not just on the applicants themselves, but also more widely on UK taxpayers. Asylum seekers are not entitled to welfare benefits nor employment except in some limited cases, and are often placed (...)
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  46. Towards the ethical publication of country of origin information (COI) in the asylum process.Nikita Aggarwal & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (2):247-257.
    This article addresses the question of how ‘Country of Origin Information’ reports—that is, research developed and used to support decision-making in the asylum process—can be published in an ethical manner. The article focuses on the risk that published COI reports could be misused and thereby harm the subjects of the reports and/or those involved in their development. It supports a situational approach to assessing data ethics when publishing COI reports, whereby COI service providers must weigh up the benefits and harms (...)
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  47. Review of Strangers in our Midst. [REVIEW]Göran Collste - forthcoming - Ethical Perspectives 2017.
    The refugee question is without doubt the most controversial political issue in today’s Europe. There is a crucial need for philosophical analyses of the migration question and the moral dilemmas it creates, and it is thus timely that David Miller, one of the leading political philosophers, publish a book on this topic. Often, Miller backs up his argument by referring to views of the “general public”. Of course it is a relevant aspect if, say, a large number of immigrants will (...)
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  48.  51
    US Erosion of the Right to Asylum.Damian Williams - forthcoming - Forthcoming.
    Under the UDHR, all persons have the right to "seek and to enjoy . . . asylum from persecution." From this designation as fundamental followed codification of the right in the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol Relating (collectively 'the Convention'), the "centrepiece" of treaties and customary norms that make up international refugee law. It defines and regulates the status and rights of refugees; its purpose is to safeguard the basic rights of (...)
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  49. The Irreplaceability of Place: What We Lose When We Lose Our Homeland.John Madock - 2021 - Biblioteca Della Libertà 232 (56):83-98.
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  50. The Iranian Architects in Exile: Hossein Amanat.Asma Mehan - 2023 - In Sofia Celli (ed.), Architects in Exile: Stories of New Spatial Experience. Thymos Book. pp. 24-26.
    Collective imagination has traditionally associated architecture with political and economic power. As a result, when quoting Edward Said: «Modern Western culture is, in large part, the work of exiles, émigrés, refugees», the last people we typically consider are exiled architects. But is the heritage left by exiled architects truly insignificant? Can we find expressions of their spiritual quest, new life experiences, nostalgic feelings, and aesthetic shocks in their works? When does Modernism cease to be a universal language and instead (...)
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