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Ricardo Sousa Silvestre
Federal University of Campina Grande
  1. Karma Theory, Determinism, Fatalism and Freedom of Will.Ricardo Sousa Silvestre - 2017 - Logica Universalis 11 (1):35-60.
    The so-called theory of karma is one of the distinguishing aspects of Hinduism and other non-Hindu south-Asian traditions. At the same time that the theory can be seen as closely connected with the freedom of will and action that we humans supposedly have, it has many times been said to be determinist and fatalist. The purpose of this paper is to analyze in some deepness the relations that are between the theory of karma on one side and determinism, fatalism and (...)
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  2.  40
    Handbook of the First World Congress on Logic and Religion.Ricardo Sousa Silvestre & Jean-Yves Beziau (eds.) - 2015 - Campina Grande, PB, Brasil: EDUFCG.
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  3.  53
    Logic and the Concept of God.Stanisław Krajewski & Ricardo Sousa Silvestre - 2019 - Journal of Applied Logics 6 (6):999-1005.
    Several important philosophical questions might be posed about God. The most common one, perhaps, is: Does God exist? This is an ontological question. A traditional way to deal with it is through argumentation. Arguments for and against the existence of God have been proposed and subjected to logical analysis in different periods of the history of philosophy. One of the most famous arguments in the history of philosophy, the ontological argument, first proposed by Anselm in his seminal work, the Proslogion, (...)
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  4.  32
    Some Thoughts on the Logical Aspects of the Problem of Evil.Ricardo Sousa Silvestre - forthcoming - In Ricardo Sousa Silvestre, Benedikt Paul Göcke, Jean-Yves Beziau & Purushottama Bilimoria (eds.), Beyond Faith and Rationality: Essays on Logic, Religion and Philosophy. Berlin, Germany: Springer.
    My purpose in this chapter is to take seriously the idea that problem of evil is an incompatibility between the proposition that the world was created and is ruled by an omnipotent, omniscient and unlimitedly good being and one that says that there is evil and suffering in our world. Besides being in accordance with much of the literature on the problem of evil, this idea takes the problem at face value, that is to say, it sees it as a (...)
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