Results for 'Vaiśeṣika'

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Bibliography: Vaisesika in Asian Philosophy
  1. Is Cognition an Attribute of the Self or It Rather Belongs to the Body? Some Dialectical Considerations on Udbhaṭabhaṭṭa’s Position Against Nyāya and Vaiśeṣika.Krishna Del Toso - 2011 - Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):48.
    In this article an attempt is made to detect what could have been the dialectical reasons that impelled the Cār-vāka thinker Udbhatabhatta to revise and reformulate the classical materialistic concept of cognition. If indeed according to ancient Cārvākas cognition is an attribute entirely dependent on the physical body, for Udbhatabhatta cognition is an independent principle that, of course, needs the presence of a human body to manifest itself and for this very reason it is said to be a peculiarity of (...)
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  2.  22
    Review of ShashiPrabha Kumar, Categories, Creation and Cognition in Vaiśeṣika Philosophy. [REVIEW]Malcolm Keating - 2020 - Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics 43:139-141.
    As a guide to source material, the book will be useful to readers already somewhat familiar with Vaiśeṣika, and as a reference guide, the book’s lists of categories (padārthas) and other related concepts will also be handy for the same. However, the book is less satisfactory for readers wishing for a general introduction to the study of Vaiśeṣika, given its organization, coupled with its heavy use of untranslated Sanskrit and assumption that readers are already familiar with Indian philosophy. (...)
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  3. Nyāya-Vaiśesika Inherence, Buddhist Reduction, and Huayan Total Power.Nicholaos Jones - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):215-230.
    This paper elaborates upon various responses to the Problem of the One over the Many, in the service of two central goals. The first is to situate Huayan's mereology within the context of Buddhism's historical development, showing its continuity with a broader tradition of philosophizing about part-whole relations. The second goal is to highlight the way in which Huayan's mereology combines the virtues of the Nyāya-Vaisheshika and Indian Buddhist solutions to the Problem of the One over the Many while avoiding (...)
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  4. Consciousness and the Mind-Body Problem in Indian Philosophy.Christian Coseru - 2018 - In Rocco J. Gennaro (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Consciousness. New York: Routledge. pp. 92-104.
    This chapter considers the sheer amount of literature associated with the exploration of consciousness in Indian philosophy. It focuses on a range of methodological and conceptual issues, drawing on three main sources: the naturalist theories of mind of Nyaya and Vaisesika, the mainly phenomenological accounts of mental activity and consciousness of Abhidharma and Yogacara Buddhism, and the subjective transcendental theory of consciousness of Advaita Vedanta. The contributions of Indian philosophers to the study of consciousness are examined not simply as a (...)
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  5. Presuppositions of India's Philosophies.Karl H. Potter - 1963 - Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    A brief account of karma and transmigration is followed by an introduction to Indian ways of assessing arguments. The body of the work canvasses the systems of Nyaya Vaisesika, Buddhism, Jainism, Samkhya and Advaita Vedanta.
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  6. Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy.Balaganapathi Devarakonda - 2009 - Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered into six and three respectively. (...)
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  7. Abordaje Académico de la Lógica en la India, las escuelas Nyaya-Vaisesica contra el nihilismo budista.Alexander Valdenegro - 2010 - Dissertation, Universidad de la República
    "In the programs of Logic and History of Philosophy in the FHUCE study and introduction to logic is always done on the basis of Western classical Greek tradition, and its development is still exclusively through Western culture. This presentation aims to provide a path parallel to the West is the tradition of Nyaya-Vaisesika schools, which arise in the S. V B.C. like a response to the anti-Vedic Buddhist nihilism, and reached an important technical development at the beginning of S. II (...)
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