Results for 'pharmakon'

7 found
Order:
  1. Difference, Dissemination, Opposition, Pharmakon.Khristos Nizamis - 2001 - In V. E. Taylor & C. E. Winquist (eds.), Encyclopedia of Postmodernism. Routledge. pp. 97-99, 103-104, 266-267, 279-281.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  72
    Societies of Disindividuated Hyper-Control: On the Question of a New Pharmakon[REVIEW]Ekin Erkan - 2019 - Rhizomes: Cultural Studies in Emerging Knowledge 35.
    Drawing on Adorno and Horkheimer's oft-quoted 1944 essay, “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception,” Bernard Stiegler’s The Age of Disruption affirms that the Frankfurt School duo scrupulously envisaged a “new kind of barbarism,” or an inversion of modernity’s Enlightenment project illustrated by our contemporary political semblance. Surveying the critical social fissures that index contemporary Western civil society—from 9/11 to the 2002 Nanterre massacre and the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting—Stiegler diagnoses that our epoch is plagued by the “absence of epoch,” (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  7
    Is There a Problem of Writing in Historiography? Plato and the Pharmakon of the Written Word.Natan Elgabsi - 2019 - Metodo. International Studies in Phenomenology and Philosophy 7 (2):225-264.
    This investigation concerns first what Jacques Derrida and Paul Ricœur consider to be «the question of writing» in Plato’s Phaedrus, and then whether their conception of a general philosophical problem of writing finds support in the dialogue. By contrast to their attempts to «determine» the «status» of writing as the general condition of knowledge, my investigation has two objections. (1) To show that Plato’s concern is not to define writing, but to reflect on what is involved in honest and dishonest (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  95
    Bi-Medial Plato, Derrida's Pharmakon.Francesco Tampoia - manuscript
    Only ten years since Derrida’s death, with critical detachment, is it possible to be in touch with him again, to start from the beginning of his philosophizing in company with Plato, and from this vantage point to re-read Dissemination? What really stands between Plato and Derrida? In the first page of Pharmacia Derrida writes: “We will take off here from the Phaedrus ... Only a blind or grossly insensitive reading, could indeed spread the rumour that Plato was simply condemning the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  76
    The Pharmacological Significance of Mechanical Intelligence and Artificial Stupidity.Adrian Mróz - 2019 - Kultura I Historia 36 (2):17-40.
    By drawing on the philosophy of Bernard Stiegler, the phenomena of mechanical (a.k.a. artificial, digital, or electronic) intelligence is explored in terms of its real significance as an ever-repeating threat of the reemergence of stupidity (as cowardice), which can be transformed into knowledge (pharmacological analysis of poisons and remedies) by practices of care, through the outlook of what researchers describe equivocally as “artificial stupidity”, which has been identified as a new direction in the future of computer science and machine problem (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  67
    Platonism, Spinoza and the History of Deconstruction.Gordon Hull - 2009 - In K. C. Baral & R. Radhakrishnan (eds.), Theory After Derrida: Essays in Critical Praxis. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. pp. 74.
    This paper revisits Derrida’s and Deleuze’s early discussions of “Platonism” in order to challenge the common claim that there is a fundamental divergence in their thought and to challenge one standard narrative about the history of deconstruction. According to that narrative, deconstruction should be understood as the successor to phenomenology. To complicate this story, I read Derrida’s “Plato’s Pharmacy” alongside Deleuze’s discussion of Platonism and simulacra at the end of Logic of Sense. Both discussions present Platonism as the effort to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Socrates' Graveyard.William Behun - 2010 - Semiotics:137-143.
    Statues, monuments, cenotaphs and markers litter the landscape of Plato’s Phaedrus. By drawing together these numerous references and examining the economy of these silent symbols, we can gain an insight into Plato’s project, especially as it relates to questions of narrative, speech and writing. While the examination of the myth of Theuth is familiar to scholars of both Plato and Derrida, what is often overlooked is the way in which writing and speech are represented in the text by monuments, which (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark