Contents
9 found
Order:
  1. Demonstration and Necessity: A short note on Metaphysics 1015b6-9.Lucas Angioni - 2023 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 33 (33):1-24.
    I discuss a short string of five sentences in Metaphysics V.5, 1015b6-9 relating demonstration to necessity. My proposal is that Aristotle focuses his attention on the demonstration as a demonstration. Other interpretations reduce the necessity in question to the modality of the component sentences of the demonstrations (the conclusion and the premises). My view does not deny that the modality of the component sentences is important, but takes seriously the idea that a demonstration itself should be understood as necessary—as not (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Fatalism and False Futures in De Interpretatione 9.Jason W. Carter - 2022 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 63:49-88.
    In De interpretatione 9, Aristotle argues against the fatalist view that if statements about future contingent singular events (e.g. ‘There will be a sea battle tomorrow,’ ‘There will not be a sea battle tomorrow’) are already true or false, then the events to which those statements refer will necessarily occur or necessarily not occur. Scholars have generally held that, to refute this argument, Aristotle allows that future contingent statements are exempt from either the principle of bivalence, or the law of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Aristóteles e a necessidade do conhecimento científico.Lucas Angioni - 2020 - Discurso 50 (2):193-238.
    I discuss the exact meaning of the thesis according to which the object of scientific knowledge is necessary. The thesis is expressed by Aristotle in the Posterior Analytics, in his definition of scientific knowledge. The traditional interpretation understands this definition as depending on two parallel and independent requirements, the causality requirement and the necessity requirement. Against this interpretation, I try to show, through the examination of several passages that refer to the definition of scientific knowledge, that the necessity requirement specifies (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4. Aristotle’s Modal Syllogistic. [REVIEW]Lucas Angioni - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (1):211-216.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Aristotle’s Definition of Scientific Knowledge.Lucas Angioni - 2016 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 19 (1):79-104.
    In Posterior Analytics 71b9 12, we find Aristotle’s definition of scientific knowledge. The definiens is taken to have only two informative parts: scientific knowledge must be knowledge of the cause and its object must be necessary. However, there is also a contrast between the definiendum and a sophistic way of knowing, which is marked by the expression “kata sumbebekos”. Not much attention has been paid to this contrast. In this paper, I discuss Aristotle’s definition paying due attention to this contrast (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  6. Aristotle on Necessary Principles and on Explaining X through X’s essence.Lucas Angioni - 2014 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 7 (2):88-112.
    I discuss what Aristotle means when he say that scientific demonstration must proceed from necessary principles. I argue that, for Aristotle, scientific demonstration should not be reduced to sound deduction with necessary premises. Scientific demonstration ultimately depends on the fully appropriate explanatory factor for a given explanandum. This explanatory factor is what makes the explanandum what it is. Consequently, this factor is also unique. When Aristotle says that demonstration must proceed from necessary principles, he means that each demonstration requires the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  7. Review of Marko Malink, Aristotle's Modal Syllogistic[REVIEW]Jacob Rosen - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    Malink’s interpretation is designed to validate Aristotle’s claims of validity and invalidity of syllogistic-style arguments, as well as his conversion claims. The remaining sorts of claims in Aristotle's text are allowed to fall out as they may. Thus, not all of Aristotle’s examples turn out correct: on some occasions, Aristotle claims that a given pair of terms yields a true (false) sentence of a given type although, under Malink’s interpretation, the sentence in question is false (true). Similarly, some of Aristotle’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. How to save Aristotle from modal collapse.Derek von Barandy - 2013 - Studia Neoaristotelica 10 (1):89-98.
    On Jaakko Hintikka’s understanding of Aristotle’s modal thought, Aristotle is committed to a version of the Principle of Plenitude, which is the thesis that no genuine possibility will go unactualized in an infinity of time. If in fact Aristotle endorses the Principle of Plenitude, everything becomes necessary. Despite the strong evidence that Aristotle indeed accepts that Principle of Plenitude, there are key texts in which Aristotle seems to contradict it. On Hintikka’s final word on the matter, Aristotle either endorses the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Essencialismo e Necessidade Modal em Aristóteles: uma análise de Segundos Analíticos I 6.Breno A. Zuppolini - 2011 - Filogenese 4 (1):21-35.
    At the beginning of the first book of Posterior Analytics, Aristotle‟s feature of demonstrative knowledge involves a certain concept of “necessity”. The traditional interpretation tends to associate this concept with modal necessity, which is found in the Prior Analytics and De interpretatione. The present article aims to show in which way the sixth chapter of book A of Posterior Analytics presupposes a set of essentialist theses that claims to base the necessity of scientific knowledge on predicative relations of essential character. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark