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  1. "For Concerning the Philosophical World, I Am Empress of It Myself". Margaret Cavendish's Vindication of Authorship in The Blazing World.Gemma Torrellas Plans & Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona Facultat de Filosofia I. Lletres - unknown
    Cavendish's organic materialism defends that humankind's prowess of nature is unattainable due to nature's greatness and heterogeneity. Accordingly, our cognitive processes are at times unavailing at providing accurate accounts of nature. Cavendish argued that subjectivity is our best tool to inquire about nature. Equipped with this argument she took a stance against the Royal Society's empirical and objective method of exploring nature with optical devices; at the same time, this allowed her to develop an intricate notion of identity that led (...)
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  • Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Infinitude of Nature.Michael Bennett McNulty - 2018 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 35 (3):219-239.
    In this paper, I develop a new interpretation of the order of nature, its function, and its implications in Margaret Cavendish’s philosophy. According to the infinite balance account, the order of nature consists in a balance among the infinite varieties of nature. That is, for Cavendish, nature contains an infinity of different types of matter: infinite species, shapes, and motions. The potential tumult implicated by such a variety, however, is tempered by the counterbalancing of the different kinds and motions of (...)
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  • Color in a Material World: Margaret Cavendish Against the Early Modern Mechanists.Colin Chamberlain - 2019 - Philosophical Review 128 (3):293-336.
    Consider the distinctive qualitative property grass visually appears to have when it visually appears to be green. This property is an example of what I call sensuous color. Whereas early modern mechanists typically argue that bodies are not sensuously colored, Margaret Cavendish disagrees. In cases of veridical perception, she holds that grass is green in precisely the way it visually appears to be. In defense of her realist approach to sensuous colors, Cavendish argues that it is impossible to conceive of (...)
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  • Visual Perception as Patterning: Cavendish Against Hobbes on Sensation.Marcus P. Adams - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (3):193-214.
    Many of Margaret Cavendish’s criticisms of Thomas Hobbes in the Philosophical Letters (1664) relate to the disorder and damage that she holds would result if Hobbesian pressure were the cause of visual perception. In this paper, I argue that her “two men” thought experiment in Letter IV is aimed at a different goal: to show the explanatory potency of her account. First, I connect Cavendish’s view of visual perception as “patterning” to the “two men” thought experiment in Letter IV. Second, (...)
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  • “The Minde is Matter Moved”: Nehemiah Grew on Margaret Cavendish.Justin Begley - 2017 - Intellectual History Review 27 (4):493-514.
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