Switch to: References

Citations of:

Modern Moral Philosophy

Philosophy 33 (124):1 - 19 (1958)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Protecting Reasonable Conscientious Refusals in Health Care.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):565-581.
    Recently, debate over whether health care providers should have a protected right to conscientiously refuse to offer legal health care services—such as abortion, elective sterilization, aid in dying, or treatments for transgender patients—has grown exponentially. I advance a modified compromise view that bases respect for claims of conscientious refusal to provide specific health care services on a publicly defensible rationale. This view requires health care providers who refuse such services to disclose their availability by other providers, as well as to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Aristotle on the Noble and the Good: Philosophic Imprecision in the Nicomachean Ethics.John Tutuska - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):159-179.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Question of Moral Action: A Formalist Position.Iddo Tavory - 2011 - Sociological Theory 29 (4):272 - 293.
    This article develops a research position that allows cultural sociologists to compare morality across sociohistorical cases. In order to do so, the article suggests focusing analytic attention on actions that fulfill the following criteria: (a) actions that define the actor as a certain kind of socially recognized person, both within and across fields; (b) actions that actors experience—or that they expect others to perceive—as defining the actor both intersituationally and to a greater extent than other available definitions of self; and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Aristotle and Autism: Reconsidering a Radical Shift to Virtue Ethics in Engineering.Heidi Furey - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (2):469-488.
    Virtue-based approaches to engineering ethics have recently received considerable attention within the field of engineering education. Proponents of virtue ethics in engineering argue that the approach is practically and pedagogically superior to traditional approaches to engineering ethics, including the study of professional codes of ethics and normative theories of behavior. This paper argues that a virtue-based approach, as interpreted in the current literature, is neither practically or pedagogically effective for a significant subpopulation within engineering: engineers with high functioning autism spectrum (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Modern Moral Conscience.Tom O’Shea - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 26 (4):582-600.
    This article challenges the individualism and neutrality of modern moral conscience. It looks to the history of the concept to excavate an older tradition that takes conscience to be social and morally responsive, while arguing that dominant contemporary justifications of conscience in terms of integrity are inadequate without reintroducing these social and moral traits. This prompts a rethinking of the nature and value of conscience: first, by demonstrating that a morally-responsive conscience is neither a contradiction in terms nor a political (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Linking Trust to Trustworthiness.Onora O’Neill - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 26 (2):293-300.
    Trust is valuable when placed in trustworthy agents and activities, but damaging or costly when placed in untrustworthy agents and activities. So it is puzzling that much contemporary work on trust – such as that based on polling evidence – studies generic attitudes of trust in types of agent, institution or activity in complete abstraction from any account of trustworthiness. Information about others’ generic attitudes of trust or mistrust that take no account of evidence whether those attitudes are well or (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Anti-Theory in Action? Planning for Pandemics, Triage and ICU Or: How Not to Bite a Bullet. [REVIEW]Nathan Emmerich - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (1):91-100.
    Anti-theory is a multi-faceted critique of moral theory which, it appears, is undergoing something of reassessment. In a recent paper Hämäläinen discusses the relevance of an anti-theoretical perspective for the activity of applied ethics. This paper explores her view of anti-theory. In particular I examine its relevance for understanding the formal guidance on pandemic flu planning issues by the Department of Health in the UK and some subsequent discussions around triage and reverse triage decisions which may be considered by both (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Metaphysics and Methods in Moral Enquiry and Education: Some Old Philosophical Wine for New Theoretical Bottles.David Carr - 2014 - Journal of Moral Education 43 (4):500-515.
    If we reject sentimentalist accounts of the nature of moral motivation and education, then we may regard some form of reason as intrinsic to any genuine moral response. The large question for moral education is therefore that of the nature of such reason—perhaps more especially of its status as knowledge. In this regard, there is evidence of some recent drift in both ethics and theory of moral educational theory towards more instrumental pro-social skill acquisition conceptions of moral reason as more (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • How to Respond to the Problem of Deviant Formal Causation.Stephen Davey - 2013 - Philosophia 41 (3):703-717.
    Recently, a new problem has arisen for an Anscombean conception of intentional action. The claim is that the Anscombean’s emphasis on the formally causal character of practical knowledge precludes distinguishing between an aim and a merely foreseen side effect. I propose a solution to this problem: the difference between aim and side effect should be understood in terms of the familiar Anscombean distinction between acting intentionally and the intention with which one acts. I also argue that this solution has advantages (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Agente Moral Expressivista Em Nietzsche E Avaliação de Juízos Práticos Perfeccionistas.Jorge L. Viesenteiner - 2020 - Cadernos Nietzsche 41 (2):145-189.
    Resumo O objetivo do texto é relacionar a abordagem expressivista do agente moral em Nietzsche com as condições de sucesso de avaliação de juízos práticos perfeccionistas. Como locus da transformação, o agente moral se exprime por meio do potencial transformativo que consegue produzir, e não como entidade por trás das ações. Duas condições podem ser usadas, regulativamente, para avaliar o sucesso de juízos de caráter perfeccionista: por um lado, a maximização de conexões e interrelações no espaço, bem como o endosso (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Moral Seriousness.D. Seiple - forthcoming - Metaphilosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The problem of arbitrary requirements: an abrahamic perspective.Sara Aronowitz, Marilie Coetsee & Amir Saemi - forthcoming - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-22.
    Some religious requirements seem genuinely arbitrary in the sense that there seem to be no sufficient explanation of why those requirements with those contents should pertain. This paper aims to understand exactly what it might mean for a religious requirement to be genuinely arbitrary and to discern whether and how a religious practitioner could ever be rational in obeying such a requirement. We lay out four accounts of what such arbitrariness could consist in, and show how each account provides a (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • John Finnis and Alasdair MacIntyre on Our Knowledge of the Precepts of Natural Law.John Macias - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (1):103-123.
    Alasdair MacIntyre asks, if all individuals are in fact potential authorities of natural law and agree on its fundamentals, how can we explain manifest moral disagreement? Contemporary Thomistic natural law theorists have not attempted to address this particular issue to a significant degree. MacIntyre, taking this large-scale rejection seriously, focuses on the communal factors that allow individuals to recognize their need for and commitment to Thomistic natural law. By doing so, he attempts to give reasons for why we should expect (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • To the Mountaintop Again: The Early Rawls and Post-Protestant Ethics in Postwar America.P. Mackenzie Bok - 2017 - Modern Intellectual History 14 (1):153-185.
    This article draws on archival sources to offer the first thoroughgoing account of how John Rawls moved from his undergraduate Christian ethics to the mature moral theory that undergirdedA Theory of Justice. Identifying the liberal Protestant convictions at the heart of Rawls's senior thesis, it shows how he found an alternative postwar grounding for these views by applying Wittgenstein's later arguments about concepts, criteria, and inductive reasoning to ethics. The article places Rawls in the context of a whole community of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Bonhoeffer and Løgstrup: The Ethics of Disclosure in a State of Exception.Petra Brown & Patrick Stokes - 2020 - Sophia 59 (2):229-246.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Knud Ejler Løgstrup were WWII contemporaries: Lutheran theologians and religious figures in their respective German and Danish communities; both active in the anti-Nazi resistance. Being involved in the resistance, Bonhoeffer and Løgstrup were required to rethink what it meant to be ethical, in particular in relation to disclosure and the telling of truth, in a situation of war. In this paper, we consider the grounds on which both Løgstrup and Bonhoeffer acted, their belief in a duty or (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Rejection of Epistemic Consequentialism.Selim Berker - 2013 - Philosophical Issues 23 (1):363-387.
    A quasi-sequel to "Epistemic Teleology and the Separateness of Propositions." Covers some of the same ground, but also extends the basic argument in an important way.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  • Three Strands of Nothingness in Chinese Philosophy and the Kyoto School: A Summary and Evaluation.Curtis A. Rigsby - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):469-489.
    The concept of Nothingness—Japanese mu or Chinese wú 無—is central both to the Kyoto School and to important strands of Chinese philosophy. The Kyoto School, which has been active since the 1930s, is arguably modern Japan’s most philosophically sophisticated challenge to Western thought. Further, as contemporary East Asia continues to rise in importance, East Asians and Westerners alike are beginning to consider anew the contemporary philosophical relevance of Confucianism, Daoism, and East-Asian Buddhism. These originally Chinese traditions were certainly important influences (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Epistemic Teleology and the Separateness of Propositions.Selim Berker - 2013 - Philosophical Review 122 (3):337-393.
    When it comes to epistemic normativity, should we take the good to be prior to the right? That is, should we ground facts about what we ought and ought not believe on a given occasion in facts about the value of being in certain cognitive states (such as, for example, the value of having true beliefs)? The overwhelming answer among contemporary epistemologists is “Yes, we should.” This essay argues to the contrary. Just as taking the good to be prior to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   98 citations  
  • Autonomous Reboot: Aristotle, Autonomy and the Ends of Machine Ethics.Jeffrey White - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-13.
    Tonkens has issued a seemingly impossible challenge, to articulate a comprehensive ethical framework within which artificial moral agents satisfy a Kantian inspired recipe—"rational" and "free"—while also satisfying perceived prerogatives of machine ethicists to facilitate the creation of AMAs that are perfectly and not merely reliably ethical. Challenges for machine ethicists have also been presented by Anthony Beavers and Wendell Wallach. Beavers pushes for the reinvention of traditional ethics to avoid "ethical nihilism" due to the reduction of morality to mechanical causation. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reasons Not to Consider Our Options.Jeffrey Seidman - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association:1-19.
    I argue that a practical deliberator may have good reasons not to consider some option even though that option is what there is most reason, all things considered, for her to do. The most interesting reasons not to consider an option arise in cases where an agent cannot be compensated in kind for the loss of goods that she values. Where this is the case, an attitude of conservatism is warranted: it is reasonable to begin deliberation by considering only ‘no-regrets’ (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is Shame an Ugly Emotion? Four Discourses—Two Contrasting Interpretations for Moral Education.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2014 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (5):495-511.
    This paper offers a sustained philosophical meditation on contrasting interpretations of the emotion of shame within four academic discourses—social psychology, psychological anthropology, educational psychology and Aristotelian scholarship—in order to elicit their implications for moral education. It turns out that within each of these discourses there is a mainstream interpretation which emphasises shame’s expendability or moral ugliness (and where shame is typically described as guilt’s ugly sister), but also a heterodox interpretation which seeks to retrieve and defend shame. As the heterodox (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Won’T Get Fooled Again: Wittgensteinian Philosophy and the Rhetoric of Empiricism.Russell P. Johnson - 2020 - Sophia 59 (2):345-363.
    The debate surrounding eliminative materialism, and the role of empiricism more broadly, has been one of the more prominent philosophical debates of the last half-century. But too often what is at stake in this debate has been left implicit. This essay surveys the rhetoric of two participants in this debate, Paul Churchland and Thomas Nagel, on the question of whether or not scientific explanations will do away with the need for nonscientific descriptions. Both philosophers talk about this possibility in language (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Aristotle on Drugs.Tony Mercer - 2013 - The New Bioethics 19 (2):84-96.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Doctors That “Doctor” Sickness Certificates: Cunning Intelligence as an Ability and Possibly a Virtue Among Swedish GPs.Mani Shutzberg - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (3):445-456.
    The relations of power between healthcare-related institutions and the professionals that interact with them are changing. Generally, the institutions are gaining the upper hand. Consequently, the intellectual abilities necessary for professionals to pursue the internal goods of healthcare are changing as well. A concrete case is the struggle over sickness benefits in Sweden, in which the Swedish Social Insurance Agency and physicians are important stakeholders. The SSIA has recently consolidated its power over the sickness certificates that doctors issue for their (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Covenants and Commands.Toni Alimi - 2020 - Journal of Religious Ethics 48 (3):498-518.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What is a Merciful Heart? Affective-Motivational Aspects of the Second Love Command.Rico Vitz - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (3):298-320.
    In this paper, I argue that Christ’s second love command implies not only that people’s volitions and actions be Christ-like, but also that their affective-motivational dispositions be Christ-like. More specifically, I argue that the command implies that people have aretaic obligations to strive to cultivate a merciful heart with the kind of affective depth described by St. Isaac of Syria in his 71st ascetical homily—i.e., one that is disposed to becoming inflamed, such that it is gripped by “strong and vehement (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Supererogation and the Case Against an 'Overall Ought'.Elizabeth Ventham - 2020 - American Philosophical Quarterly 57 (2):181-192.
    This paper argues against a kind of 'overall ought'. The main argument is a version of the paradox of supererogation. The problem is this: obligating an agent to do what’s overall best will, when that differs from what’s morally best, obligate the agent not to do what’s morally best. This, the paper will argue, is implausible. For each of four possible interpretations of this overall ought concept, it will either come across a form of this paradox or no longer look (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Anscombe Reading Aristotle.Susana Cadilha - 2020 - Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía 64.
    Under one particular reading of it, Anscombe's 'Modern Moral Philosophy' is considered a seminal text in the revival of virtue ethics. Seen thus, Anscombe is implying that it is possible to do ethics without using concepts such as 'moral ought' or 'moral obligation', the perfect example being Aristotelian ethics. On the other hand, Anscombe claims that it is not useful at present to engage in moral philosophy since she finds that 'philosophically there is a huge gap… which needs to be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Formal and Informal Benevolence in a Profit-Oriented Context.Guillaume Mercier & Ghislain Deslandes - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (1):125-143.
    Faced with the disenchantment and disengagement expressed by their employees, business leaders are considering ways of incorporating more benevolence into managerial practices. Nevertheless, ‘benevolence’—care and concern for the well-being of others—has not yet been studied in an organizational profit-focused context. In this paper, we seek to investigate the emergence and practice of benevolence with an eye on profit and performance. We begin by investigating the main ethical approaches to benevolence—virtue ethical, utilitarian, and deontological. Then, based on an empirical study, we (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Does Neo-Aristotelian Character Education Maintain the Educational Status Quo? Lessons From the 19th-Century Bildung Tradition.Wouter Sanderse - 2019 - Ethics and Education 14 (4):399-414.
    ABSTRACTAs neo-Aristotelian character education approaches have become more popular, the list of objections has increased too. This paper focuses on the objection that while character education proponents claim to be ‘progressive’ and ‘reformative’ they seem to maintain the educational status quo. This paper examines what happens to neo-Aristotelian character education approaches when they are implemented in schools. First, a range of authors is consulted that has critically followed character education approaches, in particular the one advocated by the Jubilee Centre for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Autonomy and the Asymmetry Problem for Moral Expertise.Julia Driver - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 128 (3):619-644.
    We seem less likely to endorse moral expertise than reasoning expertise or aesthetic expertise. This seems puzzling given that moral norms are intuitively taken to be at least more objective than aesthetic norms. One possible diagnosis of the asymmetry is that moral judgments require autonomy of judgement in away that other judgments do not. However, the author points out that aesthetic judgments that have been ‘borrowed’ by aesthetic experts generate the same autonomy worry as moral judgments which are borrowed by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  • A MacIntyrean Perspective on the Collapse of a Money Market Fund.Andrea Roncella & Ignacio Ferrero - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (1):29-43.
    This paper conducts an ethical analysis of the 2008 closure of a US money market fund entitled the reserve primary fund, which triggered the first run in the money market sector and a resultant liquidity crisis that harmed the entire US financial system. Although many academics and regulators have studied and written about RPF, the question whether the decision that caused the fund to collapse represented any ethical dilemma, has not been addressed to date. With this purpose in mind, the (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Virtues, Ecological Momentary Assessment/Intervention and Smartphone Technology.Jason D. Runyan & Ellen G. Steinke - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology:1-24.
    Virtues, broadly understood as stable and robust dispositions for certain responses across morally relevant situations, have been a growing topic of interest in psychology. A central topic of discussion has been whether studies showing that situations can strongly influence our responses provide evidence against the existence of virtues (as a kind of stable and robust disposition). In this review, we examine reasons for thinking that the prevailing methods for examining situational influences are limited in their ability to test dispositional stability (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Intention, the Principle of Double Effect, and Military Action.Hugh F. T. Hoffman - unknown
    The Principle of Double Effect has served as a guide for both statesmen and soldiers since the middle ages in determining which acts in war are morally permissible and which are not. It is used, in particular, by those who make their moral decisions on the basis of certain moral rules that concern the moral consequences of action. This Principle of Double Effect comes into play in situations where an agent has the option of performing an act with both good (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Forward-Looking Requirement of Formal Justice: Neil MacCormick on Consequential Reasoning.Maksymilian Del Mar - 2015 - Jurisprudence 6 (3):429-450.
    This paper discusses a much-neglected aspect of Neil MacCormick's theory of legal reasoning, namely what he calls ‘consequential reasoning’. For MacCormick, consequential reasoning is both an omnipresent feature of legal reasoning in England and Scotland, as well as being a valuable one. MacCormick articulates the value of consequential reasoning by seeing it as contributing to the forward-looking requirement of formal justice, ie, of deciding the instant case on grounds that one is willing to adopt when deciding future similar cases. This (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Impossibility of a Virtue Ethic.Loren E. Lomasky - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (3):685-700.
    Virtue ethics is increasingly regarded as a viable alternative to consequentialist or deontological systems of normative ethics. This paper argues that there can be no such triumvirate of contending comprehensive ethical systems. That is not because virtue is unimportant but rather because genuine virtue is excellent and therefore rare. For most people in most morally salient situations there is no possibility of virtuous response because possession of the relevant virtues simply does not obtain nor can be usefully simulated. Instead, the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Impossibility of a Virtue Ethic.Loren E. Lomasky - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (3):685-700.
    Virtue ethics is increasingly regarded as a viable alternative to consequentialist or deontological systems of normative ethics. This paper argues that there can be no such triumvirate of contending comprehensive ethical systems. That is not because virtue is unimportant but rather because genuine virtue is excellent and therefore rare. For most people in most morally salient situations there is no possibility of virtuous response because possession of the relevant virtues simply does not obtain nor can be usefully simulated. Instead, the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Přirozený zákon ve filosofii 20. století a jeho zdroje.Miroslav Vacura - 2011 - E-Logos 18 (1):1-20.
    Přirozený zákon je jednou z nejvýznamnějších idejí, která stojí v základech evropského filosofického, etického a právního myšlení. Předložený článek podává stručnou expozici vývoje ideje přirozeného zákona ve filosofickém myšlení s důrazem na jeho klíčové momenty a vyjádření nosných tezí, které předurčily rozumění tomuto pojmu v následujících obdobích. Jeho cílem není detailní probádání některé z jednotlivých etap či některého z autorů, ale naopak podat souhrnný a přehledný obraz vývoje této ideje. Východiskem je zde stručné načrtnutí hlavních zdrojů ideje přirozeného zákona v (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Genealogy and Evidence: Prinz on the History of Morals.John M. Doris - 2009 - Analysis 69 (4):704-713.
    Jesse Prinz’s The Emotional Construction of Morals is among the most significant of illuminations of human morality to appear in recent years. This embarrassment of riches presents the space-starved commentator with a dilemma: survey the book’s extraordinary sweep, and slight the textured argumentation, or engage a fraction of the argumentation, and slight the sweep. I’ll fall on the second horn, and focus mostly on Chapter 7, ‘The Genealogy of Morals’. Like Prinz , 1 I think that genealogical arguments have not, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Bonhoeffer and Løgstrup: the Ethics of Disclosure in a State of Exception.Petra Brown & Patrick Stokes - 2018 - Sophia:1-18.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Knud Ejler Løgstrup were WWII contemporaries: Lutheran theologians and religious figures in their respective German and Danish communities; both active in the anti-Nazi resistance. Being involved in the resistance, Bonhoeffer and Løgstrup were required to rethink what it meant to be ethical, in particular in relation to disclosure and the telling of truth, in a situation of war. In this paper, we consider the grounds on which both Løgstrup and Bonhoeffer acted, their belief in a duty or (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • State of the Art: The Duty to Obey the Law.William A. Edmundson - 2004 - Legal Theory 10 (4):215–259.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Virtue Ethics and Moral Psychology. Editorial Note.A. Campodonico & C. Navarini - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (2):273-276.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • God’s Deontic Perfection.Brian Leftow - 2013 - Res Philosophica 90 (1):69-95.
    I offer part of an account of divine moral perfection. I defend the claim that moral perfection is possible, then argue that God has obligations, so that one part of his moral perfection must be perfection in meeting these. I take up objections to divine obligations, then finally offer a definition of divine deontic perfection.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Is the Reasonable Person a Person of Virtue?Michele Mangini - 2020 - Res Publica 26 (2):157-179.
    The ‘reasonable person standard’ is often called on in difficult legal cases as the last resource to be appealed to when other solutions run out. Its complexity derives from the controversial tasks that people place on it. Two dialectics require some clarification: the objective/subjective interpretation of the standard and the ideal/ordinary person controversy. I shall move through these dialectics from the standpoint of an EV approach, assuming that on this interpretation the RPS can perform most persuasively its tasks. The all-round (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Expressivist Explanations.Neil Sinclair - 2012 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (2):147-177.
    In this paper I argue that the common practice of employing moral predicates as explaining phrases can be accommodated on an expressivist account of moral practice. This account does not treat moral explanations as in any way second-rate or derivative, since it subsumes moral explanations under the general theory of program explanations (as defended by Jackson and Pettit). It follows that the phenomenon of moral explanations cannot be used to adjudicate the debate between expressivism and its rivals.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Virtues of Ignorance.Adam Feltz & Edward T. Cokely - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (3):335-350.
    It is commonly claimed that fully virtuous individuals cannot be ignorant and that everyday intuitions support this fact. Others maintain that there are virtues of ignorance and most people recognize them. Both views cannot be correct. We report evidence from three experiments suggesting that ignorance does not rule out folk attributions of virtue. Additionally, results show that many of these judgments can be predicted by one’s emotional stability—a heritable personality trait. We argue that these results are philosophically important for the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Education for Loneliness as a Consequence of Moral Decision-Making: An Issue of Moral Virtues.Jarosław Horowski - forthcoming - Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-15.
    The direct reference point for these analyses is the process of making moral decisions, but a particular point of interest is the difficulty associated with making decisions when acting subjects are aware that their choice of moral good can lead to the breakdown of relationships with those close to them or to their exclusion from the group that have been most important to them so far in their lives, consequently causing them to experience loneliness. This difficulty is a challenge for (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mackie Was Not an Error Theorist.Selim Berker - 2019 - Philosophical Perspectives 33 (1):5-25.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Some Remarks on Criminology and Moral Philosophy.Jonathan Jacobs - 2019 - Criminal Justice Ethics 38 (3):198-220.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Limits of Eudaimonia in the Nicomachean Ethics.Schwartz Daniel - 2016 - Journal of Greco-Roman Studies 55 (3):35-52.
    In Book I of his Nicomachean Ethics (NE), Aristotle defines happiness, or eudaimonia, in accordance with an argument he makes regarding the distinctive function of human beings. In this paper, I argue that, despite this argument, there are moments in the NE where Aristotle appeals to elements of happiness that don’t follow from the function argument itself. The place of these elements in Aristotle’s account of happiness should, therefore, be a matter of perplexity. For, how can Aristotle appeal to elements (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark