Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. J.M. Keynes, F.A. Hayek and the Common Reader.Constantinos Repapis - 2014 - Economic Thought 3 (2):1.
    This paper gives an account of the debate between F.A. Hayek and J.M. Keynes in the 1930s written for the general public. The purpose of this is twofold. First, to provide the general reader with a narrative of what happened, … More ›.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Be Fruitful and Multiply: Growth, Reason, and Cultural Group Selection in Hayek and Darwin.Naomi Beck - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (4):413-423.
    The theory of cultural evolution proposed by economist Friedrich August von Hayek is without doubt the most harshly criticized component in his highly prolific intellectual corpus. Hayek depicted the emergence of the market order as the unintended consequence of an evolutionary process in which groups whose rules of behavior led to a comparative increase in population and wealth were favored over others. Key to Hayek’s theory was the claim that the rules of the market, on which modern civilization relies, evolved (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Carl Menger's Theory of Invisible-Hand Explanations.Markus Haller - 2000 - Social Science Information 39 (4):529-565.
    Carl Menger's theory of invisible-hand explanations is rooted in his methodology of the social sciences. Contrary to his 18th-century Scottish forerunners he explains both the emergence and the persistence of unplanned social institutions exclusively by the individual pursuit of perceived self-interest. Contrary to Hayek's evolutionary functionalism, Menger's theory is not confined to the explanation of efficient or beneficial institutions. And contrary to Buchanan and Vanberg's constitutional contractualism, it does not require that people form stable preferences over rules.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Noble Markets: The Noble/Slave Ethic in Hayek’s Free Market Capitalism.Edward J. Romar - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):57-66.
    Friedrich A. von Hayek influenced many areas of inquiry including economics, psychology and political theory. This article will offer one possible interpretation of the ethical foundation of Hayek's political and social contributions to libertarianism and free market capitalism by analyzing several of his important non-economic publications, primarily The Road to Serfdom, The Fatal Conceit, The Constitution of Liberty and Law, Legislation and Liberty. While Hayek did not offer a particular ethical foundation for free market capitalism, he argued consistently that free (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Austrian Economics and the Evolutionary Paradigm.Naomi Beck & Ulrich Witt - 2019 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 57 (1):205-225.
    This article discusses the challenges raised by the inclusion of evolutionary elements in the theories of Carl Menger, Joseph Schumpeter, and Friedrich Hayek. Each adopted an idiosyncratic position in terms of method of inquiry, focus, and general message. The breadth of the topics and phenomena they cover testifies to the great variety of interpretations and potential uses of evolutionary concepts in economics. Menger, who made no reference to Darwin’s theory, advanced an “organic” view of the emergence of social institutions. Schumpeter (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Peter Singer’s “Famine, Affluence, and Morality”: Three Libertarian Refutations.J. C. Lester - manuscript
    Peter Singer’s famous and influential article is criticised in three main ways that can be considered libertarian, although many non-libertarians could also accept them: 1) the relevant moral principle is more plausibly about upholding an implicit contract rather than globalising a moral intuition that had local evolutionary origins; 2) its principle of the immorality of not stopping bad things is paradoxical, as it overlooks the converse aspect that would be the positive morality of not starting bad things and also thereby (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Regulation of Financial Conflicts of Interest in Medical Practice and Medical Research: A Damaging Solution in Search of a Problem.Thomas P. Stossel - 2007 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (1):54-71.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • 13 A Philosophical Perspective on Contemporary Evolutionary Economics.Geoffrey M. Hodgson - 2011 - In J. B. Davis & D. W. Hands (eds.), Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology. Edward Elgar Publishers. pp. 299.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Dewey and Hayek on Democratic Experimentalism.Shane J. Ralston - 2012 - Contemporary Pragmatism 9 (2):93-116.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Justice: Social and Political.Philip Pettit - 2015 - In David Sobel, Peter Vallentyne & Steven Wall (eds.), Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy, Vol. 1. Oxford University Press.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • A Reappraisal of Friedrich A. Hayek's Cultural Evolutionism: Martin De Vlieghere.Martin de Vlieghere - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (2):285-304.
    In spite of the important discoveries made by Adam Smith and later by the economists of the Austrian School, Friedrich Hayek remained intellectually challenged by the miracle of the price mechanism. As it turned out there was still some pioneering to do in describing the price mechanism. This became clear when Hayek identified the dispersal of information relevant to exchange transactions as the central issue of economic study. In the context of his distinction between competition as a state of things (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Postmodern Moments of F. A. Hayek'S Economics: Theodore A. Burczak.Theodore A. Burczak - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (1):31-58.
    Postmodernism is often characterized, among other things, as the belief in the unattainability of objective truth and as a rejection of teleological and reductionist, or essentialist, forms of thought. For instance, in his provocative book The Rhetoric of Economics, Donald McCloskey sketches the implications for economic methodology of Richard Rorty's rejection of the modernist quest for Truth, as represented by various rationalist and empiricist epistemologies. McCloskey describes modernist methodology as displaying a desire to predict and control, a search for objective–;which (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Reply to Bruce Caldwell: Can Subjectivism Be Non-Hermeneutic?: Theodore A. Burczak.Theodore A. Burczak - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (2):315-317.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Economic Freedom and Government: A Conceptual Framework.Pal Czegledi & Judit Kapas - 2010 - Journal des Economistes Et des Etudes Humaines 16 (1).
    The aim of this paper is to contribute to the development of a theory of economic freedom. In this endeavor, we build our framework on the Hayekian notion of freedom because it explicitly embodies the obvious link between freedom and the state: freedom is an absence of state coercion except for that which enforces abstract, general rules known beforehand. We derive two propositions from this Hayekian thesis and elaborate on them, leading to a categorization of government actions from the viewpoint (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Popper, Weber, and Hayek: The Epistemology and Politics of Ignorance.Jeffrey Friedman - 2005 - Critical Review 17 (1-2):1-58.
    Karl Popper's methodology highlights our scientific ignorance: hence the need to institutionalize open?mindedness through controlled experiments that may falsify our fallible theories about the world. In his endorsement of?piecemeal social engineering,? Popper assumes that the social?democratic state and its citizens are capable of detecting social problems, and of assessing the results of policies aimed at solving them, through a process of experimentation analogous to that of natural science. But we are not only scientifically but politically ignorant: ignorant of the facts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Is Neoliberalism a Liberalism, or a Strange Kind of Bird? On Hayek and Our Discontents.Matthew Sharpe - 2009 - Critical Horizons 10 (1):76-98.
    This paper examines the theoretical ideas of Friedrich von Hayek, arguably the key progenitor of the global economic orthodoxy of the past two decades. It assesses Hayek's thought as he presents it: namely as a form of liberalism. Section I argues that Hayek's thought, if liberal, is hostile to participatory democracy. Section II then argues the more radical thesis that neoliberalism is also in truth an illiberal doctrine. Founded not in any social contract doctrine, but a form of constructivism, neoliberal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Money and the Extension of Morals: The Case of the Soviet Union.Joachim Zweynert - 2012 - Critical Review 24 (1):115-129.
    Functioning markets require a state that will enforce property rights; contracts mediated by money; and the prevalence of a certain type of morality that prevents people from cheating in complex exchange relationships. Monetary exchange abstracts from the personal loyalties that bind small groups together, but at the same time it creates an overarching commitment to norms that bind people more loosely in national societies?as long as monetary exchanges are enforced by the state. In the Soviet Union, conversely, the abolition of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Networks, Knowledge, and Entrepreneurship.G. R. Steele - 2012 - Critical Review 24 (1):101-113.
    Neural activity and social activity share close parallels, particularly the fact that spontaneous adaptations are paramount in both realms. Environmental pressures require organisms and societies to adapt to new and uncertain situations. Adaptations create, respectively, stronger neural and social networks that may, in turn, make the system more resilient to future uncertainties?but only if the adaptations are beneficial to the system.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • G. A. Cohen on Self‐Ownership, Property, and Equality.Tom G. Palmer - 1998 - Critical Review 12 (3):225-251.
    Abstract G.A. Cohen has produced an influential criticism of libertarian?ism that posits joint ownership of everything in the world other than labor, with each joint owner having a veto right over any potential use of the world. According to Cohen, in that world rationality would require that wealth be divided equally, with no differential accorded to talent, ability, or effort. A closer examination shows that Cohen's argument rests on two central errors of reasoning and does not support his egalitarian conclusions, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Hayek on Social Justice: Reply to Lukes and Johnston.Edward Feser - 1997 - Critical Review 11 (4):581-606.
    Hayek's attack on the ideal of social justice, though long ignored by political theorists, has recently been the subject of a number of largely unsympathetic studies (those of Lukes and Johnston being the most recent) in which his critique is dismissed as at best simply mistaken and at worst frivolous. The responses to Hayek's case against social justice, however, fail to draw any blood, for they do not seriously deal with Hayek's central claim that the very notion of social justice (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • What's Wrong with Libertarianism.Jeffrey Friedman - 1997 - Critical Review 11 (3):407-467.
    Abstract Libertarian arguments about the empirical benefits of capitalism are, as yet, inadequate to convince anyone who lacks libertarian philosophical convictions. Yet ?philosophical? libertarianism founders on internal contradictions that render it unfit to make libertarians out of anyone who does not have strong consequentialist reasons for libertarian belief. The joint failure of these two approaches to libertarianism explains why they are both present in orthodox libertarianism?they hide each other's weaknesses, thereby perpetuating them. Libertarianism retains significant potential for illuminating the modern (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Hayek, Equilibrium, and The Role of Institutions in Economic Order.Karen I. Vaughn - 2013 - Critical Review 25 (3-4):473-496.
    In the 1930s, socialist economists used the assumptions of equilibrium theory to argue that a central planner could coordinate supply and demand from above. This argument led Hayek, over the years, to try to explain the limitations of equilibrium theory and, conversely, to explain how capitalism functioned without the assumptions of equilibrium being met. In a changing world of agents who are ignorant of the future, how is a functioning market “order” possible? One answer can be found in Hayek's argument (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Social Justice: The Hayekian Challenge.Steven Lukes - 1997 - Critical Review 11 (1):65-80.
    Abstract Hayek's argument that social justice is a mirage consists of six claims: that the very idea of social justice is meaningless, religious, self?contradictory, and ideological; that realizing any degree of social justice is unfeasible; and that aiming to do so must destroy all liberty. These claims are examined in the light of contemporary theories and debates concerning social justice in order to assess whether the argument's persuasive power is due to sound reasoning, and to what extent contemporary theories of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Epistemological Argument Against Socialism: A Wittgensteinian Critique of Hayek and Giddens.Nigel Pleasants - 1997 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):23 – 45.
    Hayek's and Mises's argument for the impossibility of socialist planning is once again popular. Their case against socialism is predicated on an account of the nature of knowledge and social interaction. Hayek refined Mises's original argument by developing a philosophical anthropology which depicts individuals as tacitly knowledgeable rule-followers embedded in a 'spontaneous order' of systems of rules. Giddens, whose social theory is informed by his reading of Wittgenstein, has recently added his sociological support to Hayek's 'epistemological argument' against socialism. With (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Hayek’s Vicarious Secularization of Providential Theology.Tim Christiaens - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 45 (1):71-95.
    Friedrich Hayek’s defense of neoliberal free market capitalism hinges on the distinction between economies and catallaxies. The former are orders instituted via planning, whereas the latter are spontaneous competitive orders resulting from human action without human design. I argue that this distinction is based on an incomplete semantic history of “economy.” By looking at the meaning of “oikonomia” in medieval providential theology as explained by Giorgio Agamben and Joseph Vogl, I argue how Hayek’s science of catallactics is itself a secularization (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Narratology of Lay Ethics.Jean-Pierre Dupuy - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (2):153-170.
    The five narratives identified by the DEEPEN-project are interpreted in terms of the ancient story of desire, evil, and the sacred, and the modern narratives of alienation and exploitation. The first three narratives of lay ethics do not take stock of what has radically changed in the modern world under the triple and joint evolution of science, religion, and philosophy. The modern narratives, in turn, are in serious need of a post-modern deconstruction. Both critiques express the limits of humanism. They (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • On Cognition and Cultural Evolution.Shinji Teraji - 2014 - Mind and Society 13 (2):167-182.
    This paper examines two paths by which F. A. Hayek’s work has influenced the cognitive theory of institutions: cognition and cultural evolution. It argues that there is a relationship between the sensory order and the social order. The explanation of social order begins with the human mind. This is illustrated with ideas relating to understanding culture from a cognitive viewpoint. Human cognition makes cultural evolution an endogenous process. The paper draws on ideas of co-evolution of individuals’ mental models and their (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • How Cognitive Neuroscience Informs a Subjectivist-Evolutionary Explanation of Business Ethics.Marc Orlitzky - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (4):717-732.
    Most theory in business ethics is still steeped in rationalist and moral-realist assumptions. However, some seminal neuroscientific studies point to the primacy of moral emotions and intuition in shaping moral judgment. In line with previous interpretations, I suggest that a dual-system explanation of emotional-intuitive automaticity and deliberative reasoning is the most appropriate view. However, my interpretation of the evidence also contradicts Greene’s conclusion that nonconsequentialist decision making is primarily sentimentalist or affective at its core, while utilitarianism is largely rational-deliberative. Instead, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Behind Global System Collapse: The Life-Blind Structure of Economic Rationality. [REVIEW]John McMurtry - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):49-60.
    This study examines the system-deciding principle of economic rationality for its logical soundness and effects in global practice. Analysis demonstrates the fallacious structure of the underlying assumptions of homo economicus across theories and institutions, and explains how cumulative destruction of global economic, social, and ecological life systems follows from its life-blind mechanism. Higher-order concepts of life-capital, life-value efficiency, and life-good supply and demand are then defined to bring economic rationality into coherence with terrestrial and human life requirements.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Is Market Society Intrinsically Repugnant?Jason Brennan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):271-281.
    In Why Not Socialism ?, G. A. Cohen argues that market society and capitalism are intrinsically repugnant. He asks us to imagine an ideal camping trip, which becomes increasing repugnant as it shifts from living by socialist to capitalist principles. In this paper, I expose the limits of this style of argument by making a parallel argument, which shows how an ideal anarchist camping trip becomes increasingly repugnant as the campsite turns from anarchism to democracy. When we see why this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Commodification and Privacy: A Lockean Perspective.Richard Volkman - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (3):179-195.
    This paper defends the thesis that privacy as a right is derived from fundamental rights to life, liberty, and property and does not permit restricting the commodification of bodily material; however, privacy as life, liberty, property does require conventions that ensure a robust and just market in bodily material. The analysis proceeds by defending a general commitment to liberty and markets, but not in the manner one might expect from a ‘doctrinaire’ libertarian. Ethical concerns about commodification are legitimate in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Noble Markets: The Noble/Slave Ethic in Hayek’s Free Market Capitalism. [REVIEW]Edward J. Romar - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):57 - 66.
    Friedrich A. von Hayek influenced many areas of inquiry including economics, psychology and political theory. This article will offer one possible interpretation of the ethical foundation of Hayek’s political and social contributions to libertarianism and free market capitalism by analyzing several of his important non-economic publications, primarily The Road to Serfdom, The Fatal Conceit, The Constitution of Liberty and Law, Legislation and Liberty. While Hayek did not offer a particular ethical foundation for free market capitalism, he argued consistently that free (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Peace Through Tourism: Commerce Based Principles and Practices. [REVIEW]Stuart E. Levy & Donald E. Hawkins - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):569 - 585.
    While tourism's positive contributions to societies have long been debated, commerce based tourism activities can strengthen peaceful societies by adhering to sustainable tourism principles. This study utilizes content analysis to examine 136 tourism practices from four major awards programs for their contributions to sustainability and peace. Specific practices which illuminate each of these contributions are highlighted. The findings reveal the most common initiatives focus on environmental quality, economic development, and community nourishment efforts, with substantially less focus on initiatives to engage (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Nuclear Power.John Levendis, Walter Block & Joseph Morrel - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (1):37-49.
    Nuclear power has never been free from the stifling involvement of government. Heavy regulation has reduced the ability of entrepreneurs to develop and provide new means for the generation of energy using nuclear fuel. The strict parameters dictated by government officials are based upon outdated technology, an improper regulatory philosophy, and preclude innovation in nuclear power generation. Anti-market environmentalists misunderstand the implications of a free market in nuclear power and argue against it based on problems that are actually caused by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Double Movement in Polanyi and Hayek: Towards the Continuation of Life.Filipe Nobre Faria - 2018 - Ethics, Politics and Society 1:329-350.
    Karl Polanyi's double movement is a dialectical process characterized by a continuous tension between a movement towards social marketization and a movement towards social protectionism. Notably, Polanyi condemns the former movement while defending the latter. Without using the term " double movement " , F.A Hayek's theory of social evolution acknowledges the same phenomenon but reaches different normative conclusions. While for Polanyi the marketization of society is a utopia with dystopian consequences, Hayek's evolutionary explanation of this dialectical process asserts that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “Unintended Effects”: A Theorem for Complex Systems.J. L. Usó-Doménech, J. Nescolarde-Selva & M. Lloret-Climent - 2016 - Complexity 21 (2):342-354.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Notion of “Moral Firm” and Distributive Justice in an Islamic Framework.Toseef Azid & Osamah H. Rawashdeh - 2018 - Intellectual Discourse 26:357-382.
    This paper discusses conventional and Islamic concepts of distributivejustice, and develops propositions for the establishment of firms deemed to bemoral firms from Islamic perspective. Generally, distributive justice impliesthat goods should be distributed among members of the community accordingto their standing in society. In the Islamic scenario, however, the positive andthe normative aspects work simultaneously. The management of a firm seeksnot only to earn profit in this world but also to get reward in the life-hereafter.Thus, it is duty of a firm (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Hayek's Political Philosophy and His Economics.Jeffrey Friedman - 1997 - Critical Review 11 (1):1-10.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • George Soros: Hayekian?Bruce Caldwell - 2013 - Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (4):350-356.
    This paper examines many similarities in the methodological and ontological views of George Soros and Friedrich Hayek.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Sexual Harassment and Wrongful Communication.Edmund Wall - 2001 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (4):525-537.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Markets and Morality.Peter J. Hill & John Lunn - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (4):627-653.
    For most of human history, economic systems were personal in nature--people normally interacted with people they knew personally and knew well. Today's modern market economies are impersonal--people normally interact with people they do not know personally. The historical movement from personal to impersonal systems was necessary for societies to develop the specialization of labor needed for modern production technologies. That is, the high standards of living in the developed world are due to these impersonal systems. However, the ethical systems theologians (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Why Economics is Not a Science of Behaviour.Marek Hudík - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (2):147-162.
    The paper criticises psychologism, i.e. the idea that economics is a science of behaviour or that it must be rooted in such a science. The argument is based on Hayek and Popper's thesis that economics studies spontaneous order. First, it is argued that if economics is to retain its traditional distance from psychology, it has to abandon the notion that it is concerned with behaviour. Then it is shown that there is no simple one-way causation from the psychological to the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Feminist Economics: An Austrian Perspective.Steven Horwitz - 1995 - Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (2):259-280.
    This paper attempts to assess the recent literature on feminist economics from the perspective of modern Austrian economics. Feminists and Austrians share many epistemological and methodological criticisms of neoclassical theory, although Austrians have never linked those criticisms to gender. Both groups argue that the attempt to mimic the methods of the natural sciences has been a particular source of trouble for neoclassicism. The paper suggests that these common points of criticism can serve as a starting point for dialogue between the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Formative Decade: Methodological Controversy in the 1930s.T. W. Hutchison - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):297-314.
    An edited version of a semi-autobiographical piece that Terence Hutchison wrote in 2001?2003, shortly before his death, in which he reflected on the methodological developments in which he had been involved, centred on the London School of Economics, in the 1930s. It explains very clearly the context out of which his own work arose. Particular attention is paid to the work of Lionel Robbins, Frank Knight and the philosopher Felix Kaufmann.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Between Social Science and Social Technology: Toward a Philosophical Foundation for Post-Communist Transformation Studies.Andreas Pickel - 2001 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (4):459-487.
    This analysis examines fundamental questions at the intersection of social science and social technology as well as problems of disciplinary divisions and the challenge of cross-disciplinary cooperation. Its theoretical-empirical context is provided by post-communist transformations, a set of profound societal changes in which institutional design plays a central role. The article critically reappraises the contribution of Karl Popper's philosophy to this problem context, examines neoliberalism as social science and social technology, and examines the role of experts and disciplinary divisions in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • W.W. Bartley, III 1934–1990.Angelo M. Petroni - 1990 - Critical Review 4 (4):737-742.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Regulatory Sanctions on Independent Directors and Their Consequences to the Director Labor Market: Evidence From China.Michael Firth, Sonia Wong, Qingquan Xin & Ho Yin Yick - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (4):693-708.
    We investigate the regulatory sanctions imposed on independent directors for their firms’ financial frauds in China. These regulatory sanctions are prima-facie evidence of significant lapses in business ethics. During the period 2003–2010, 302-person-time independent directors were penalized by the regulator, and the two stock exchanges. We find that the independent directors with accounting experiences are more likely to be penalized by the CSRC, though they do not suffer more severe penalties than do the other sanctioned independent directors. We also find (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Hubris of Hybrids.Philipp Bagus, David Howden & Amadeus Gabriel - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (2):373-382.
    In the pages of this journal, a fruitful debate has evolved on the ethical legitimacy of fractional-reserve banking. In this article, we respond to the new arguments raised by Evans as we clarify our position on the unethical and illegitimate nature of fractional-reserve banking. Fractional-reserve banking is not a recent financial innovation but represents a long-standing legal aberration. The co-mingling of two mutually exclusive financial contracts, deposit and loan, confounds the contracting parties’ purposes, intents, rights, and obligations. As a result, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Hayek, Social Justice, and the Market: Reply to Johnston.Edward Feser - 1998 - Critical Review 12 (3):269-281.
    David Johnston 's Rejoinder to my defense of Hayek's critique of social justice, though it has the merit of attempting to deal with Hayek's claim that the very idea of social justice is incoherent, fails to undermine that defense. Johnston 's suggested counterexample to Hayek's claim that talk of an injustice presupposes an agency responsible for the injustice is not even prima facie plausible; he overlooks crucial disanalogies between the pursuit of social justice and the pursuit of other social goals; (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations