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  1. Jamming the machines: “Woman” in the work of irigaray and deleuze.Janice Richardson - 1998 - Law and Critique 9 (1):89-115.
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  • “A City of Brick”: Visual Rhetoric in Roman Rhetorical Theory and Practice.Kathleen S. Lamp - 2011 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (2):171-193.
    Perhaps none of the words Augustus, the first sole ruler of Rome who reigned from 27 BCE to 14 CE, actually said are quite as memorable as the ones Cassius Dio has attributed to him: "I found Rome built of clay and I leave it to you in marble" .1 Suetonius too discusses Augustus's building program, offering an alleged quote along with an explanation of his motivation: "Since the city was not adorned as the dignity of the empire demanded, and (...)
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  • “A City of Brick”: Visual Rhetoric in Roman Rhetorical Theory and Practice.Kathleen S. Lamp - 2011 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (2):171-193.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:"A City of Brick":Visual Rhetoric in Roman Rhetorical Theory and PracticeKathleen S. LampPerhaps none of the words Augustus, the first sole ruler of Rome who reigned from 27 BCE to 14 CE, actually said are quite as memorable as the ones Cassius Dio has attributed to him: "I found Rome built of clay and I leave it to you in marble" (1987, 56.30).1 Suetonius too discusses Augustus's building program, (...)
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  • 'A demented form of the familiar': Postmodernism and educational research.Maggie Maclure - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (2):223–239.
    What can postmodernism do for, or to, educational research? The article discusses its potential for resisting closure and simplification. Developing a ‘preposterous’, anachronistic postmodern method that is caught up with surrealism and the baroque, the article plays with trompel'oeil paintings and outmoded popular entertainments such as magic lanterns, peep shows and clockwork automata as figures for critique and analysis. It argues for defamiliarisation, fascination, recalcitrance and frivolity as methodic practices for research in the compromised conditions of postmodernity, and as forms (...)
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  • 'A Demented Form of the Familiar': Postmodernism and Educational Research.Maggie Maclure - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (2):223-239.
    What can postmodernism do for, or to, educational research? The article discusses its potential for resisting closure and simplification. Developing a ‘preposterous’, anachronistic postmodern method that is caught up with surrealism and the baroque, the article plays with trompel'oeil paintings and outmoded popular entertainments such as magic lanterns, peep shows and clockwork automata as figures for critique and analysis. It argues for defamiliarisation, fascination, recalcitrance and frivolity as methodic practices for research in the compromised conditions of postmodernity, and as forms (...)
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  • Sensing Agency and Resistance in Old Prisons: A Pragmatist Analysis of Institutional Control.King-To Yeung & Mahesh Somashekhar - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (3):79-101.
    Using the exemplary case of 19th-century American state penitentiaries, the authors explore penitentiary control from the perspective of sensing agents who navigate a controlled sensory ecology – the prison, as structured by institutional rules, differential power relations, and architectural plans. Moving beyond Foucault’s Discipline and Punish and Goffman’s Asylums, they stress a pragmatist approach to understanding human sensing and explain inmates’ creativity under constraints. Employing wardens’ disciplinary journals and other secondary reports, the article emphasizes three theoretical issues that explain why (...)
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  • Michel Serres: A pedagogical life.John A. Weaver & Marla Beth Morris - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (4):350-352.
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  • Ironies in the History of Flamenco.William Washabaugh - 1995 - Theory, Culture and Society 12 (1):133-155.
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  • Textures of Light: Vision and Touch in Irigaray, Levinas, and Merleau-Ponty.Kelly Oliver - 1998 - Hypatia 16 (1):106-108.
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  • Sonic Cyberfeminisms: Introduction.Marie Thompson & Annie Goh - 2021 - Feminist Review 127 (1):1-12.
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  • Philosophy's real-world consequences for deaf people: Thoughts on iconicity, sign language and being deaf.Ernst Thoutenhoofd - 2000 - Human Studies 23 (3):261-279.
    The body of philosophical knowledge concerning the relations among language, the senses, and deafness, interpreted as a canon of key ideas which have found their way into folk metaphysics, constitutes one of the historically sustained conditions of the oppression of deaf people. Jonathan Rée, with his book I see a voice, makes the point that a philosophical history, grounded in a phenomenological and causal concern with philosophical thought and social life, can offer an archaeology of philosophy's contribution to the social (...)
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  • Shadow and shade: The ethopoietics of enlightenment.Mick Smith - 2003 - Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (2):117 – 130.
    Modern Western thought and culture have envisaged their task in terms of a metaphorics, a metaphysics and a technics of 'enlightenment'. However, the ethical and environmental implications of this determination to dispel all shadows have become increasingly pernicious as modernity both extends and alters the conceptualization and employment of (a now artificial) light as a tool of discovery and control. Drawing on the work of Foucault and Benjamin amongst others, this paper seeks to illustrate, through a critical ethopoietics, the 'speculative (...)
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  • Duchamp’s Wager: Disguise, the Play of Surface, and Disorder.John Scanlan - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (3):1-20.
    This article considers the notion of ‘play’ in the plastic arts as described by Johan Huizinga, its definitional relation to the materiality of the art object, and the way in which such a conception rests on a notion of aesthetic order that, after the work of Marcel Duchamp, could not be sustained. I argue that Duchamp’s readymadesforce a re-evaluation of plasticity (and thus of Huizinga’s definition of play), and introduce a permanent revolution of plasticity, which in social and intellectual terms (...)
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  • Undoing the Image: Film Theory and Psychoanalysis.Paula Quigley - 2011 - Film-Philosophy 15 (1):13-32.
    The primary aim of this article is to point up an essential attitude, an anxiety even, that has inflected – and perhaps inhibited - our engagement with film. Film theory has been marked by a ‘refusal to see, a looking away’ (Mulvey & Wollen 1976, 36), and my suggestion is that this has achieved its fullest expression in those strands of film theory heavily influenced by psychoanalysis. These, in turn, have remained within a gendered conceptual framework whereby the discursive or (...)
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  • A Cinema of Boredom: Heidegger, Cinematic Time and Spectatorship.Chiara Quaranta - 2020 - Film-Philosophy 24 (1):1-21.
    Boredom, in cinema as well as in our everyday experience, is usually associated with a generalised loss of meaning or interest. Accordingly, boredom is often perceived as that which ought to be avo...
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  • In the domain of the image.Michael A. Peters & E. Jayne White - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (7):677-682.
    In our world we sleep and eat the image and pray to it and wear it too.– Don DeLillo, (2016) Mao II, p.27, Pan Macmillan.Some three years ago we envisioned a project concerning the shift from text...
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  • The forgetting of touch.Mark Paterson - 2005 - Angelaki 10 (3):115 – 132.
    We like Euclidean geometry because we are men [sic], and have eyes and hands, and need to operate a concept of space that will be independent of orientation, distance and size. Lucas, A Treatise on Time and Space.
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  • Architecture of Sensation: Affect, Motility and the Oculomotor.Mark Paterson - 2017 - Body and Society 23 (1):3-35.
    Recent social theory that stresses the ‘nonrepresentational’, the ‘more-than visual’, and the relationship between affect and sensation have tended to assume some kind of break or rupture from historical antecedents. Especially since the contributions of Crary and Jay in the 1990s, when it comes to perceiving the built environment the complexities of sensation have been partially obscured by the dominance of a static model of vision as the principal organizing modality. This article returns to some prior historical articulations of the (...)
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  • Texturing Visibility: Opaque Femininities and Feminist Modernist Studies.Ilya Parkins - 2014 - Feminist Review 107 (1):57-74.
    This essay examines women's spectacularly visible status in feminised mass cultural domains in the first decades of the twentieth century. Feminine spectacles are commonly understood to invite viewers to access women's bodies, yet early twentieth-century spectacles paradoxically called renewed attention to women's illegibility. Women's visual prominence made apparent their ‘unknowability’, recasting an ancient ideational heritage in modern terms. Representations of women as opaque in the early twentieth century constituted a challenge to ocularcentrism and reveal the centrality of femininity in mass (...)
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  • The look of love.Kelly Oliver - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):56-78.
    : I begin to suggest an alternative to the notion of vision based in alienation and hostility put forth by Jean-Paul Sartre, Sigmund Freud, and Jacques Lacan. I diagnose this alienating vision as a result of a particular alienating notion of space presupposed by their theories. I develop Irigaray's comments about light and air to suggest an alternative notion of space that opens up the possibility that vision connects us to others rather than alienates us from them.
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  • The Look of Love.Kelly Oliver - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):56-78.
    I begin to suggest an alternative to the notion of vision based in alienation and hostility put forth by Jean-Paul Sartre, Sigmund Freud, and Jacques Lacan. I diagnose this alienating vision as a result of a particular alienating notion of space presupposed by their theories. I develop lrigaray's comments about light and air to suggest an alternative notion of space that opens up the possibility that vision connects us to others rather than alienates us from them.
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  • Book review: Myra Marx feree, Judith Lorber and Beth B. Hess. Revisioning gender. London: Sage publications, 1999. [REVIEW]Linda Nicholson - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (1):90-91.
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  • Słowa i obrazy. Próba koncyliacji na przykładzie twórczości Witkacego.Monika Murawska - 2021 - Acta Universitatis Lodziensis. Folia Philosophica. Ethica-Aesthetica-Practica 39:65-78.
    The article discusses Paweł Polit’s book on the philosophy and painterly oeuvre of S. I. Witkiewicz that relates both areas of Witkiewicz’s work based on his idea of “unity of personality.” Exploring Witkacy’s theory, also contained in his literary works, Polit confronts it with the philosophical sources of his thought, as well as with Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology and Deleuze’s and Derrida’s reflections on painting that bring to the fore its corporeal, haptic dimension. The idea of the “unity of personality” is, according (...)
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  • Birdsong and the Image of Evolution.Rachel Mundy - 2009 - Society and Animals 17 (3):206-223.
    For nearly a quarter of Darwin's Descent of Man , it is the singing bird whose voice presages the development of human aesthetics. But since the 1950s, aesthetics has had a perilous and contested role in the study of birdsong. Modern ornithology's disillusionment with aesthetic knowledge after World War II brought about the removal of musical studies of birdsong, studies which were replaced by work with the sound spectrograph, a tool that changes the elusive sounds of birdsong into a readable (...)
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  • The violent aesthetic: A reconsideration of transgressive body art.Eric Mullis - 2006 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (2):85-92.
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  • Being Seen by the Doctor: A Meditation on Power, Institutional Racism, and Medical Ethics.Bryan Mukandi - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):33-44.
    The following pages sketch the outlines of “a Canaanite reading” of the health system. Beginning with the Black person—African, Afro-diasporic, Aboriginal, and Torres Strait Islander—who is seen by a health professional, the functions and effects of the racializing gaze are examined. I wrestle with Al Saji’s understanding of “colonial disregard,” Whittaker’s insights into the extractive disposition of settler institutions vis-à-vis Indigenous peoples, and Saidiya Hartman and Fred Moten’s struggle with the spectacular. This leads me to conclude that the situation of (...)
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  • The Haunting Temporalities of Transplantation.Donna McCormack - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (2):58-82.
    This article examines the temporality of organ transplantation with a focus on memoirs where the recipient has received an organ from a deceased donor. I argue that death constitutes life. That is, this absent presence – that the organ is materially present but the person is dead and therefore absent – is the foundation for rethinking relationality as constituted through the haunting presence of those who remain central to the continuity of life but who are not alive in any strict (...)
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  • Fleshing Out the Political: Merleau-Ponty, Lefort and the Problem of Alterity.Paul Mazzocchi - 2013 - Critical Horizons 14 (1):22-43.
    This paper attempts to draw out the political import of Merleau-Ponty’s ontology of the flesh, by engaging the critique levelled against it by his student and literary executor Claude Lefort. In suggesting a tension in Merleau-Ponty’s work that obscures alterity, Lefort seems to miss the rich political import of Merleau-Ponty’s ontology of the flesh. Founded in his development of the concepts of écart and reversibility, Merleau-Ponty’s ontological position breaks with many of the standard tenets of political thinking, and offers a (...)
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  • Bataille’s anti-fascism.Robyn Marasco - 2022 - Contemporary Political Theory 21 (1):3-23.
    This article draws from the reading protocols developed by José Esteban Muñoz to advance a political reading of Georges Bataille. It argues for a consistent and coherent anti-fascism across Bataille’s work, from the early “political” writings to the mature turn toward mysticism. Focusing in particular on his writings from the 1930s, this article clarifies some of the key concepts in Bataille’s critical theory of fascism: expenditure, heterology, base materialism, and democratic anguish.
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  • Moving Eyes: The Aesthetic Effect of Off-Centre Pupils in Portrait Paintings.Theis Vallø Madsen - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (1):59-78.
    Most eighteenth- and nineteenth-century portrait paintings have eyes staring outward at the beholder. A minority of these eyes have slightly elevated pupils in comparison to the iris. These off-centre pupils are not the norm, but they occur regularly in works by skilful European portrait painters in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This article takes a closer look at selected portrait paintings by Danish artists Jens Juel and Constantin Hansen and argues that the discrepancy between the pupils and the rest of (...)
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  • The Social Construction of Space and Gender.Martina Löw - 2006 - European Journal of Women's Studies 13 (2):119-133.
    Over the past 10 years two concepts of central significance in the social sciences have come up for rediscussion: ‘space’ and ‘gender’. Today the two concepts are seen as relational, as a production process based on relation and demarcation. Gender and space alike are a provisional result of an – invariably temporal – process of attribution and arrangement that both forms and reproduces structures. This article takes a microsociological look at the construction of the local, seeking to trace the genderization (...)
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  • Study Abroad: Tourism or education? A multimodal social semiotic analysis of institutional discourses of a promotional website.José Aldemar Álvarez Valencia & Kristen Michelson - 2016 - Discourse and Communication 10 (3):235-256.
    The rise in Study Abroad participation among college students has increased interest among educationalists wondering about the impact of SA on students, particularly when students return home without evidence of deep engagement and understanding of other cultures and people. The purpose of this case study was to locate one potential source of the meanings ascribed to the SA experience, through analysis of multimodal representations on the institutional website of a popular SA program provider. In this study, Kress’ model of multimodal (...)
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  • The Birth of Fire, Indescribable Light, and the Limits of Philosophy’s Violence: Nāgārjuna and Plato Seeing and Speaking of Nothing.Adam Loughnane - 2020 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 12 (3):211-226.
    This study places Nāgārjuna and Plato in dialogue regarding how both seek to orient philosophy in the face of indeterminacy observed at the elemental level of existence, specifically, the indeterminacy of fire’s light. Looking to the elemental within Chōra and Śūnyatā, a directive becomes discernible for calibrating philosophy to this indeterminacy, and crucial limitations are disclosed, which expand philosophy by enabling a productive relation to the non-philosophical. What emerges are directives for language, which serve to modify philosophy’s violence towards the (...)
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  • Book review: Myra Marx feree, Judith Lorber and Beth B. Hess. Revisioning gender. London: Sage publications, 1999. [REVIEW]Linda Nicholson - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (1):90-91.
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  • The Symbolist aesthetic and the impact of occult and esoteric ideologies on modern art.Marja Lahelma - 2018 - Approaching Religion 8 (1):31-47.
    Within the past couple of decades, art-historical scholarship has developed a more acute awareness of the need to reassess and re-evaluate its dominant narratives. It has become apparent that the value judgements that have guided modernist historiography can no longer be taken for granted, and there has been an ever-increasing demand for more diverse perspectives. One central issue which has gradually surfaced into broader consciousness, is the impact of occult and esoteric ideas on artistic theories and practices since the late (...)
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  • Making Sense of Sound: Auscultation and Lung Sound Codification in Nineteenth-Century French and German Medicine.Jens Lachmund - 1999 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 24 (4):419-450.
    With the introduction of the technique of auscultation in nineteenth-century medicine, the auditory became a most important means of producing diagnostic knowledge. The correct classification and interpretation of the sounds revealed by auscultation, however, remained an issue of negotiation and often controversy throughout the mid-nineteenth century. This article examines the codification of lung sounds within two cultural and geographic contexts: first, the original approach as it was developed by Laennec and his followers in Paris that came to be dominant in (...)
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  • Solon's "Theôria" and the End of the City.James Ker - 2000 - Classical Antiquity 19 (2):304-329.
    How are we to understand Solon's departure from Athens "for the sake of theôria" immediately after the introduction of his laws ? Previous accounts have taken theôria to mean "sightseeing," but the goal of Solon's departure-to avoid explaining or changing the laws-is guaranteed by certain religious features of theôria: the theôros plays the role of civic guardian and must not add to or subtract from an oracle he conveys to the city, and during the theôria the city itself must remain (...)
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  • Book review: Cathryn Vasseleu. Textures of light: Vision and touch in Irigaray, Levinas and Merleau-ponty. New York: Routledge, 1998. [REVIEW]Kelly Oliver - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (1):106-108.
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  • What is the Red Knot Worth?: Valuing Human/Avian Interaction.Jeffrey Karnicky - 2004 - Society and Animals 12 (3):253-266.
    Approximately at the turn of the nineteenth century, the visual encounter between humans and birds, which has been going on since both forms of life have existed, began to solidify into a hobby, into something that a middle-class citizen of American might spend a morning doing. Certain technologies—optics , field guides, and later, automobiles—helped to enable this pursuit. In the twentieth century, bird watching became an immense industry. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, one report claims that in America (...)
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  • Trinitarian Perception.Mark Eli Kalderon - 2017 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 91 (1):21-41.
    We begin with a puzzle about how to intelligibly combine the active and passive elements of perception. For counsel, we turn to Augustine’s account of perception in De Trinitate. Augustine’s trinitarian account of perception offers an attractive resolution of our puzzle. Augustine’s resolution of our puzzle, however, cannot be straightforwardly adopted. It must be adapted. We end with speculation about how this might be done.
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  • A Mannheim for All Seasons: Bloor, Merton, and the Roots of the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.David Kaiser - 1998 - Science in Context 11 (1):51-87.
    The ArgumentDavid Bloor often wrote that Karl Mannheim had “stopped short” in his sociology of knowledge, lacking the nerve to consider the natural sciences sociologically. While this assessment runs counter to Mannheim's own work, which responded in quite specific ways both to an encroaching “modernity” and a looming fascism, Bloor's depiction becomes clearer when considered in the light of his principal introduction to Mannheim's work — a series of essays by Robert Merton. Bloor's reading and appropriation of Mannheim emerged from (...)
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  • The Cornered Object of Psychoanalysis: Las Meninas, Jacques Lacan and Henry James. [REVIEW]Sigi Jöttkandt - 2013 - Continental Philosophy Review 46 (2):291-309.
    Long recognised as a painting ‘about’ painting, Velázquez’s Las Meninas comes to Lacan’s aid as he explicates the object a in Seminar XIII, The Object of Psychoanalysis (1965–1966). The famous seventeenth century painting provides Lacan with a visual mapping of the ‘ghost story’ he discovers in the Cartesian cogito, insofar as it depicts the unravelling of the Cartesian representational project at the moment of its founding gesture. This article traces Lacan’s argument as he turns to art, linear perspective and topology (...)
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  • Theory and Philosophy: Antonyms in Our Semantic Field?Martin Jay - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (1):6-20.
    In 1996, the sociological journal Theory and Society devoted a special issue to “Theory and Theoreticians.”1 My contribution, titled “For Theory,” was intended as an homage to the late Alvin Gouldner, the radical social theorist, self-described “outlaw Marxist,” and founding editor of the journal, among whose many books was one called For Sociology.2 The essay was also dedicated to the memory of Bill Readings, a gifted literary theorist inspired in particular by Jean-François Lyotard, and a participant in the seminar I (...)
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  • Abstract Time and Affective Perception in the Sonic Work of Art.Eleni Ikoniadou - 2014 - Body and Society 20 (3-4):140-161.
    The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of rhythm as enabling relations and thus as an appropriate mode of analysis for digital sound art installation. In particular, the article argues for a rhythmanalysis of the sonic event as a ‘vibrating sensation’ (Deleuze and Guattari) that incorporates the virtual without necessarily actualizing it. Picking up on notions such as rhythm, time, affect, and event, particularly through their discussion in relation to Susanne Langer’s work, I argue for the consideration (...)
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  • Discordant order: Manila’s neo-patrimonial urbanism.Trevor Hogan - 2012 - Thesis Eleven 112 (1):10-34.
    Manila is one of the world’s most fragmented, privatized and un-public of cities. Why is this so? This paper contemplates the seemingly immutable privacy of the city of Manila, and the paradoxical character of its publicity. Manila is our prime exemplar of the 21st-century mega-city whose apparent disorder discloses a coherent order which we here call ‘neo-patrimonial urbanism’. Manila is a city where poor and rich alike have their own government, infrastructure, and armies, the shopping malls are the simulacra of (...)
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  • Auditory Space, Ethics and Hospitality: ‘Noise’, Alterity and Care at the End of Life.Yasmin Gunaratnam - 2009 - Body and Society 15 (4):1-19.
    This article examines the limits and potential of hospitality through struggles over auditory space in care at the end of life. Drawing upon empirical research and a nurse’s account of noisy mourning in a multicultural hospice ward, I argue that the insurgent force of noise as corporeal generosity can produce impossible dilemmas for care, while also provoking surprising ethical relations and potentialities. Derrida’s ideas about the aporias of the gift and absolute responsibility are used to make sense of the pushy (...)
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  • The Subject (of) Listening.Anthony Gritten - 2014 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 45 (3):203-219.
    Jean-Luc Nancy's phenomenology of listening makes a series of claims about the sonic/auditory nature of the subject. First among these is the claim that the subject is a subject to the extent that it is listening, that it is all ears. The subject emerges on the back of the resonance of timbre in the body and the body's becoming-rhythmic. These claims are phrased often in musical terms, or making use of terms and rhetoric from the domains of music theory and (...)
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  • Given time: biology, nature and photographic vision.Steve Garlick - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (5):81-101.
    The invention of photography in the early 19th century changed the way that we see the world, and has played an important role in the development of western science. Notably, photographic vision is implicated in the definition of a new temporal relation to the natural world at the same time as modern biological science emerges as a disciplinary formation. It is this coincidence in birth that is central to this study. I suggest that by examining the relationship of early photography (...)
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  • Enlightenment as Tragedy: Reflections on Adorno's Ethics.Samir Gandesha - 2001 - Thesis Eleven 65 (1):109-130.
    This article argues that the figure of Oedipus lies at the heart of Horkheimer and Adorno's Dialectic of Enlightenment. Oedipus is the prototypical Aufklärer as no one can rival him in his courageous attempt to employ his own autonomous reason `without direction from another'; yet self-knowledge remains beyond his grasp. Indeed, Oedipus' obsessive drive to bring the truth to light ultimately leads him to put out his own eyes because he is unable to bear the sight of the catastrophe that (...)
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  • Social Policy for Cyborgs.Tony Fitzpatrick - 1999 - Body and Society 5 (1):93-116.
    Although the body has become of increasing importance throughout the social sciences, it has been neglected by the discipline of social policy. The aim of this article is to rectify that neglect. It argues that the connections which some have begun to make between social welfare and the body can be strengthened by reference to the figure of the cyborg. The article develops a model that can be used to explain the cyborgization of social identity. This process of cyborgization is (...)
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