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  1. Methodological and Theoretical Aspects of Descartes' Treatise on The Rainbow.Douwe Tiemersma - 1988 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (3):347.
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  • Color in a Material World: Margaret Cavendish Against the Early Modern Mechanists.Colin Chamberlain - 2019 - Philosophical Review 128 (3):293-336.
    Consider the distinctive qualitative property grass visually appears to have when it visually appears to be green. This property is an example of what I call sensuous color. Whereas early modern mechanists typically argue that bodies are not sensuously colored, Margaret Cavendish disagrees. In cases of veridical perception, she holds that grass is green in precisely the way it visually appears to be. In defense of her realist approach to sensuous colors, Cavendish argues that it is impossible to conceive of (...)
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  • Newton’s Scaffolding: The Instrumental Roles of His Optical Hypotheses.Walsh Kirsten - forthcoming - In A. Vanzo & P. Anstey (eds.), Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy. Routledge.
    Early modern experimental philosophers often appear to commit to, and utilise, corpuscular and mechanical hypotheses. This is somewhat mysterious: such hypotheses frequently appear to be simply assumed, odd for a research program which emphasises the careful experimental accumulation of facts. Isaac Newton was one such experimental philosopher, and his optical work is considered a clear example of the experimental method. Focusing on his optical investigations, I identify three roles for hypotheses. Firstly, Newton introduces a hypothesis to explicate his abstract theory. (...)
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  • Kuhn and the Quantum Controversy. [REVIEW]Peter Galison - 1981 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):71-85.
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  • More Clothes From the Emperor's Bargain Basement. [REVIEW]Paul K. Feyerabend - 1981 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 32 (1):57-71.
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  • Essay Review: History and Methodology: Fact and Theory. An Aspect of Philosophy of ScienceFact and Theory. An Aspect of Philosophy of Science. O'NeilW. M. . Pp. Xiv + 193. £3.30.Gerd Buchdahl - 1970 - History of Science 9 (1):93-101.
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  • Light, Pressure, and Rectilinear Propagation: Descartes' Celestial Optics and Newton's Hydrostatics.Alan E. Shapiro - 1974 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 5 (3):239.
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  • Newton's "Experimentum Crucis" and the Logic of Idealization and Theory Refutation.Ronald Laymon - 1978 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 9 (1):51.
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  • The Empiric Experience and the Practice of Autonomy.Michael Ben-Chaim - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (4):533-555.
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  • Revisions of Descartes's Matter Theory in Le Monde.Rosaleen Love - 1975 - British Journal for the History of Science 8 (2):127-137.
    There are several differences between the theories of matter published by René Descartes in 1637 and 1644 which deserve attention. The differences follow from Descartes's well-known identification of substance with spatial extension, and his consequent rejection of the void. Since there was no void space, Descartes argued, a very finely divided subtle matter must extend throughout the universe in order to fill all space not otherwise occupied by the less finely divided ordinary matter. In the 1637 treatises La dioptrique and (...)
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  • The Essence and Soul of Seventeenth-Century Scientific Revolution.Zev Bechler - 1987 - Science in Context 1 (1):87-101.
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  • Background and Foreground: Getting Things in Context.David Knight - 1987 - British Journal for the History of Science 20 (1):3-12.
    Historians generally grumble at the liberties taken with letters and papers by editors and biographers in the past, while reviewers may complain at the professorial pomposities which interfere with the reader's interaction with the text. Certainly, reading is not a mere matter of information retrieval or of source-mining, but a meeting of minds, and any over-zealous editing which makes this more difficult will have failed. Editors, whether of journals or of documents, are midwives of ideas—self-effacingly bringing an author's meaning and (...)
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  • Graphic Understanding: Instruments and Interpretation in Robert Hooke's Micrographia.Michael Aaron Dennis - 1989 - Science in Context 3 (2):309-364.
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  • The Ontology of Determination: From Descartes to Spinoza.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (4):515-543.
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  • Hume's Colors and Newton's Colored Lights.Dan Kervick - 2018 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 16 (1):1-18.
    In a 2004 paper, “Hume’s Missing Shade of Blue Reconsidered from a Newtonian Perspective,” Eric Schliesser argues that Hume’s well-known discussion of the missing shade of blue “reveals considerable ignorance of Newton’s achievement in optics,” and that Hume has failed to assimilate the lessons taught by Newton’s optical experiments. I argue in this paper, contrary to Schliesser, that Hume’s views on color are logically and evidentially independent of Newton’s results. In developing my reading, I will argue that Schliesser accepts an (...)
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