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  1. What Can Political Freedom Mean in a Multicultural Democracy? On Deliberation, Difference, and Democratic Governance.Clarissa Rile Hayward - 2011 - Political Theory 39 (4):468-497.
    This essay takes as its starting point an apparent tension between theories of democratic deliberation and democratic theories of multicultural accommodation and makes the case that many multiculturalists and deliberative democrats converge on an ideal of political freedom, understood as nondomination. It argues for distinguishing two dimensions of nondomination: inter-agentive nondomination, which obtains when all participants in a power relation are free from rule by others who can set its terms, and systemic nondomination, which obtains when the terms of a (...)
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  • Beyond Non-Domination: Agency, Inequality and the Meaning of Freedom.Sharon R. Krause - 2013 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (2):187-208.
    The concept of non-domination is an important contribution to the study of freedom but it does not comprehend the whole of freedom. Insofar as domination requires a conscious capacity for control on the part of the dominant party, it fails to capture important threats to individual freedom that permeate many contemporary liberal democracies today. Much of the racism, sexism and other cultural biases that currently constrain the life-chances of members of subordinate groups in the USA are largely unconscious and unintentional, (...)
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  • The Two Faces of Domination in Republican Political Theory.Michael J. Thompson - 2018 - European Journal of Political Theory 17 (1):1474885115580352.
    I propose a theory of domination derived from republican political theory that is in contrast to the neo-republican theory of domination as arbitrary interference and domination as dependence. I suggest that, drawing on of the writings of Machiavelli and Rousseau, we can see two faces of domination that come together to inform social relations. One type of domination is extractive dominance where agents are able to derive surplus benefit from another individual, group, or collective resource, natural or human. Another is (...)
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  • Freedom in the Market.Philip Pettit - 2006 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (2):131-149.
    The market is traditionally hailed as the very exemplar of a system under which people enjoy freedom, in particular the negative sort of freedom associated with liberal and libertarian thought: freedom as noninterference. But how does the market appear from the perspective of a rival conception of freedom (freedom as non-domination) that is linked with the Roman and neo-Roman tradition of republicanism? The republican conception of freedom argues for important normative constraints on property, exchange, and regulation, without supporting extremes to (...)
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  • Neo-Republicanism and the Civic Economy.Richard Dagger - 2006 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (2):151-173.
    It is clear that a revival of republicanism is under way, but it is not clear that the republican tradition truly speaks to contemporary concerns. In particular, it is not clear that republicanism has anything of value to say about economic matters in the early 21st century. I respond to this worry by delineating the main features of a neo-republican civic economy that is, I argue, reasonably coherent and attractive. Such an economy will preserve the market, while constraining it to (...)
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  • Reconstructing Republican Freedom: A Critique of the Neo-Republican Concept of Freedom as Non-Domination.Michael J. Thompson - 2013 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (3):277-298.
    This article presents a critique of Philip Pettit’s concept of ‘freedom as non-domination’ and provides an alternative theory of both domination and republican political freedom. I argue that Pettit’s neo-republican concept of domination is insufficient to confront modern forms of domination and that this hampers his concept of republican freedom and its political relevance under the conditions of modernity. Whereas the neo-republican account of domination is defined by ‘arbitrary interference’, modern forms of domination, I argue, are characterized by routinization and (...)
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  • What Should Egalitarians Believe?Martin O'neill - 2008 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 36 (2):119-156.
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  • An Agency‐Based Capability Theory of Justice.Rutger Claassen - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1279-1304.
    The capability approach is one of the main contenders in the field of theorizing social justice. Each citizen is entitled to a set of basic capabilities. But which are these? Martha Nussbaum formulated a set of ten central capabilities. Amartya Sen argued they should be selected in a process of public reasoning. Critics object that the Nussbaum-approach is too perfectionist and the Sen-approach is too proceduralist. This paper presents a third alternative: a substantive but non-perfectionist capability theory of justice. It (...)
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  • What Could Be Wrong with a Mortgage? Private Debt Markets From a Perspective of Structural Injustice.Lisa Herzog - 2017 - Journal of Political Philosophy 25 (4):411-434.
    In many Western capitalist economies, private indebtedness is pervasive, but it has received little attention from political philosophers. Economic theory emphasizes the liberating potential of debt contracts, but its picture is based on assumptions that do not always hold, especially when there is a background of structural injustice. Private debt contracts are likely to miss their liberating potential if there is deception or lack of information, if there is insufficient access to (regular forms of) credit, or if credit is overly (...)
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  • Debt, Freedom, and Inequality.Alex Gourevitch - 2012 - Philosophical Topics 40 (1):135-151.
    In contemporary society, private debt has substituted for other ways of financing the consumption of basic social goods like housing, education, and medical care. This is at least partially due to increased inequality, which has allowed costs to rise faster than median incomes, as well as due to stagnating public provisions. Debt-financed access to basic goods is problematic because it creates new kinds of unfreedom and undermines the value of the freedoms that the indebted do manage to keep or acquire. (...)
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  • Structural Injustice and the Distribution of Forward‐Looking Responsibility.Christian Neuhäuser - 2014 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 38 (1):232-251.
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  • Equality, Priority, and Positional Goods.Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift - 2006 - Ethics 116 (3):471-497.
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  • What is the Point of Equality.Elizabeth Anderson - 1999 - Ethics 109 (2):287-337.
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  • Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives.Elizabeth Anderson - 2017 - Princeton University Press.
    Why our workplaces are authoritarian private governments—and why we can’t see it One in four American workers says their workplace is a “dictatorship.” Yet that number almost certainly would be higher if we recognized employers for what they are—private governments with sweeping authoritarian power over our lives. Many employers minutely regulate workers’ speech, clothing, and manners on the job, and employers often extend their authority to the off-duty lives of workers, who can be fired for their political speech, recreational activities, (...)
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  • Democracy Against Domination: Contesting Economic Power in Progressive and Neorepublican Political Theory.K. Sabeel Rahman - 2017 - Contemporary Political Theory 16 (1):41-64.
    This article argues that current economic upheaval should be understood as a problem of domination, in two respects: the ‘dyadic’ domination of one actor by another, and the ‘structural’ domination of individuals by a diffuse, decentralized, but nevertheless human-made system. Such domination should be contested through specifically democratic political mobilization, through institutions and practices that expand the political agency of citizens themselves. The article advances this argument by synthesizing two traditions of political thought. It reconstructs radical democratic theory from the (...)
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  • Reclaiming the System. Moral Responsibility, Divided Labour, and the Role of Organizations in Society. Oxford U.Lisa Herzog - 2018
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  • Market Freedom as Antipower.Robert S. Taylor - 2013 - American Political Science Review 107 (3):593-602.
    Historically, republicans were of different minds about markets: some, such as Rousseau, reviled them, while others, like Adam Smith, praised them. The recent republican resurgence has revived this issue. Classical liberals such as Gerald Gaus contend that neo-republicanism is inherently hostile to markets, while neo-republicans like Richard Dagger and Philip Pettit reject this characterization—though with less enthusiasm than one might expect. I argue here that the right republican attitude toward competitive markets is celebratory rather than acquiescent and that republicanism demands (...)
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  • Justice and the Politics of Difference.Debra A. DeBruin - 1993 - Ethics 103 (2):398-400.
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  • The Insufficiency of Non-Domination.Patchen Markell - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (1):9-36.
    This essay argues that the neo-Roman republican principle of "non-domination," as developed in the recent work of Philip Pettit, cannot serve as a single overarching political ideal, because it responds to only one of two important dimensions of concern about human agency. Through critical engagements with several aspects of Pettit's work, ranging from his philosophical account of freedom as "discursive control" to his appropriation of the distinction between dominium and imperium, the essay argues that the idea of domination, which responds (...)
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  • A General Theory of Domination and Justice. By Frank Lovett.Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):190-192.
    The review argues that Lovett’s theory of domination suffers from a problem. Lovett is aware of the problem and bites a fairly large bullet in response to it. What he does not seem aware of is that the problem can be avoided by opting for an account of welfare that he unfortunately ignores, despite the fact that it would serve his purposes well.
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  • Equality and Freedom in the Workplace: Recovering Republican Insights.Elizabeth Anderson - 2015 - Social Philosophy and Policy 31 (2):48-69.
    "The terms do not have to be spelled out, because they have been set not by a meeting of minds of the parties, but by a default baseline defined by corporate, property, and employment law that establishes the legal parameters for the constitution of capitalist firms." p. 2.
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  • Labor Republicanism and the Transformation of Work.Alex Gourevitch - 2013 - Political Theory 41 (4):0090591713485370.
    In the nineteenth century a group of “labor republicans” argued that the system of wage-labor should be replaced by a system of cooperative production. This system of cooperative production would realize republican liberty in economic, not just political, life. Today, neo-republicans argue that the republican theory of liberty only requires a universal basic income. A non-dominated ability to exit is sufficient to guarantee free labor. This essay reconstructs the more radical, labor republican view and defends it against the prevailing the (...)
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  • A Non-Normative Theory of Power and Domination.Pamela Pansardi - 2013 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (5):1-20.
    Despite the variety of competing interpretations of domination, a common feature of the most influential analyses of the concept is their reliance on a normative criterion: the detrimental effect of domination on those subject to it. This article offers a non-evaluative, non-consequence-based definition of domination, in line with the perspective on power developed by the theory of the social exchange. Domination, it is argued, should be seen as a structural property of a power relation, and consists in an extreme inequality (...)
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  • Social Connection and Practice Dependence: Some Recent Developments in the Global Justice Literature: Iris Marion Young, Responsibility for Justice. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011; and Ayelet Banai, Miriam Ronzoni and Christian Schemmel, Social Justice, Global Dynamics. Oxford: Routledge, 2011.Robert Jubb - 2013 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (5):1-16.
    This review essay discusses two recent attempts to reform the framework in which issues of international and global justice are discussed: Iris Marion Young's ?social connection' model and the practice-dependent approach, here exemplified by Ayelet Banai, Miriam Ronzoni and Christian Schemmel's edited collection. I argue that while Young's model may fit some issues of international or global justice, it misconceives the problems that many of them pose. Indeed, its difficulties point precisely in the direction of practice dependence as it is (...)
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  • Harm to Self.Joel Feinberg & Donald Vandeveer - 1988 - Ethics 98 (3):550-565.
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  • The Morality of Freedom.Joseph Raz - 1986 - Philosophy 63 (243):119-122.
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